The Government has brought the control of the new psychoactive substance methiopropamine as a class B drug under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 from 27 November 2017

December 15th, 2017 by

The 1971 Act controls drugs that are ‘dangerous or otherwise harmful’. A three tier system of classification (Class A, B and C) is adopted to provide a framework within which criminal penalties are set. This is based on an assessment of the harms associated with a drug, or its potential harms when misused, and the type of illegal activity undertaken in regards to that drug. The control of MPA has been made following the recommendation of the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (‘ACMD’).

The National Programme of Substance Abuse Deaths reported 46 cases where MPA was found in post mortem toxicology, between 2012 and April 2017. In all of these occurrences, MPA was found in combination with other substances, mainly NPS. MPA was implicated in the cause of death for 33 cases.

The ACMD recommended that MPA be listed as a Class B drug under the 1971 Act. This drug has also been inserted into Schedule 1 to the 2001 Regulations and designated as a drug to which section 7(4) of the 1971 Act applies since the ACMD reported no known recognised medicinal or legitimate uses beyond potential research use which will be enabled under a Home Office licence.

What is Methiopropamine and what are the risks associated with its use? See Drug Factsheet.

Circular – Changes to the MDA to include MPA – FINAL – DAU

Factsheet

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Who will you spend Christmas with? A Paramedic, a Firefighter, a street pastor or even a Police Officer?

December 12th, 2017 by

This festive season, as many of us drink more than intended, a new campaign is urging people to think about how and who they want to spend their Christmas with.

The Safer Cornwall partnership festive safe drinking campaign asks people out enjoying festivities over the coming weeks to drink sensibly while enjoying Cornwall and Christmas, not to risk spending time somewhere they would rather not be – whether in a police cell or a hospital.

Drinking too much can impact on our already stretched services such as the NHS and Police force. Those services will be more than happy to help if you really need it, but they don’t really want to spend time with you because you’ve had too much to drink.

Sally Hawken, Cornwall Council Cabinet member for Wellbeing and Public Health said: “Drinking more than normal can bring on a false sense of confidence. This can lead to bad choices or decisions, such as drink driving or getting into arguments and fights. In a few cases, this can lead to people ending up in hospital, losing their drivers licence, getting fined, being arrested, or having accidents which put themselves or other people in danger”.

“The Council and its partners hope everyone enjoys the festive season. People should rightly be able to have fun, but we also want people to be safe. This campaign reminds people to drink sensibly, and to plan how they’ll get home safely.”

Jez Bayes, Alcohol strategy lead for Cornwall Council’s Drug and Alcohol Action Team said: “We don’t want to be the Christmas Grinch and say that you shouldn’t drink at all, because we know that for most of us that’s not going to happen! What we’re asking is that people go out and have fun in a way that doesn’t impact on others, or potentially affect their own future.

Top tips to enjoy Cornwall and drink sensibly this festive season:

  • Alternate alcoholic drinks with soft drinks or water
  • It’s safest to stick drinks you’re familiar with, so that you know how you will react
  • Keep an eye on your drink when out, and don’t get to the point where you wouldn’t notice if someone spiked you
  • Plan how you will get home – book a taxi in advance, organise a lift, or have a designated driver in your group
  • Don’t attempt to reason with people who have drunk too much
  • Say thanks to anyone out there to keep you safe: door staff, street pastors, police, paramedics

 

Copy of the Festive Drinking Posters

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‘Tis the season to be wary warns Cornwall’s Trading Standards  

December 12th, 2017 by

Shoppers are being warned to be wary of opportunistic scams this Christmas by Cornwall Council’s Trading Standards team.

The safest way to avoid the disappointment of being ripped off or receiving broken, substitute or poor quality gifts to give as Christmas presents, is to buy goods from genuine, established shops and businesses.

However, with more and more people opting to buy presents online, Cornwall Council’s Trading Standards team are urging people to be cautious before entering their payment details on websites or giving them over the phone.

Fair Trade Team Manager Nigel Strick said: “Last Christmas, Royal Mail handled over 138 million parcels, with almost 90% of shoppers buying some or all of their presents online. The average household spends almost £800 on Christmas, which means a lot of money is being paid to online businesses for goods that people haven’t actually seen.

“Unfortunately, this volume of online spending and the pressure associated with ‘must have’ Christmas presents means that there is even greater risk of being targeted by on-line fraudsters, so it pays to take a few precautions and be safe.”

To help people avoid falling victim to scammers and ensure they have a merry Christmas, Trading Standards has issued the following advice:

  • Fake delivery emails or phone calls: In the run-up to Christmas, many people have dozens of packages arriving and often lose track of what they’ve ordered. Scammers know this and send out emails or make phone calls that purport to come from legitimate courier companies. Usually these ask for payments to ‘release’ the parcel or redirect victims to scam websites containing malware or further scams.
  • Stay safe: Never agree to make any payment for the release of a parcel. Delivery companies will usually leave a card if you are out so use the information on that card to check on the delivery company’s website. Check the sender’s address to make sure it is something you are expecting and go to that company’s own website to track orders.
  • Fake online shops: As the pressure mounts to find that ‘must have’ gift or to save money on Christmas present buying or even to find the time to buy the all-important presents so does the number of bogus websites offering exactly what you need and often at bargain prices. Sometimes these sites will look identical to other, legitimate websites – but it’s all part of the scam, designed to trick you into parting with your money. How do you protect yourself against this? What can people do?
  • Stay secure: Look out for the padlock sign on the left of the toolbar and look for ‘https’ instead of ‘http’” at the start of the website address before you enter any sensitive information. This means a website is secure.  Look for online reviews of the website to see if others have had problems or can confirm its authenticity. And check that you know exactly who you are dealing with – the name of the business, its registered office, contact details in case of problems, etc.
  • E-voucher and ticket scams: Trying to save some money or grab a bargain can lead you open to e-voucher or ticket scams. These are often shared via social media or by direct e-mail and can claim to offer free vouchers from well-known brands. But click on the link and you will inevitably be taken to a fake site where you will be asked for a small payment or for your personal details. Online ticket agencies are often the best way to purchase must have tickets for shows, concerts and events – but even some of the larger online sites these days offer tickets they don’t have.
  • Email safety: Be careful when opening any e-mail from an unfamiliar address, no matter how tempting the offer sounds. Poor spelling and grammar is one tell-tale sign that something isn’t right. If in doubt, check the voucher by contacting the actual shop, and only buy tickets from the officially authorised website or box office.
  • Social media scams: Social media sites are often used to advertise amazing deals on electronics, toys, perfumes, fashion clothing and jewellery. But be warned, lots of these offers are completely bogus or are offering counterfeit copies. Either way, your disappointment is the only thing that will be guaranteed. Social networks also make it easy to share links to phishing sites and malware. Only deal with genuine, authorised outlets and websites – companies that you have dealt with before.

Cornwall Council’s Cabinet Member for Public Protection Sue James said: “Remember, if an offer in your email or text inbox sounds too good to be true, it probably is.  It pays to be wary and to treat anything suspicious in the same cautious way that you would any unexpected emails or texts offering to save you money.”

Scams can be reported on 03454 040506 , with advice on the latest scams and how to avoid them available via the Action Fraud website.

Businesses in Cornwall selling goods via the internet can get advice and information about obligations and liabilities from Trading Standards by calling 0300 1234 212 (option 2).

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Festive drinking tips for young people !

December 6th, 2017 by

In the coming festive period, if you are going to drink more than usual (and you know you shouldn’t, but be honest now – you just might!) Please consider these tips to keep yourself safe. Have fun this Christmas! Have a great time letting your hair down with friends over a drink if you like – but follow these top tips for young people to stay safe.

If you know any young people who may need this advice please pass it on to them!

 

 

Top Tips

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We want to hear from you if you’ve living with a long term health condition

November 24th, 2017 by

Are you living with heart disease, cancer, diabetes or a respiratory condition, or do you work with people who do? The Wellbeing and Public Health team at Cornwall Council are working with partners across the health, social care and voluntary sector to better understand how to support people to self-manage their health conditions.

On average, people living with a health condition spend just 3 hours per year with their health care team; the rest of the time they are managing day to day life with that condition or their own – or self-managing. Over three-quarters of respondents (77%) from a national survey of over 2,500 people with long-term conditions thought that more of their ongoing health problems could and should be managed independently at home. In Cornwall, 68% of people in Cornwall feel supported to manage their long term condition, better than the national average.

“Self-management includes all the actions taken by people to recognise, treat and manage health and wellbeing independently of or in partnership with the healthcare system” said Rachel Wigglesworth, Consultant in Public Health. “We want to better understand what options people in Cornwall are using at the moment, and what they find most useful.”

Dr Alison Flanagan, GP and Clinical Lead for Long Term Conditions at Kernow Clinical Commissioning Group, said: “We’re asking about a number of different types of support that people might use to self-manage. For example, do you use apps or devices to monitor your condition or would you like to? Have you taken steps to lead a healthier lifestyle? Do you go to a self-help group for people with the same condition? As more and more of us are living with long term conditions, it is vital that people feel as supported and confident as possible.”

Ann Bennett lives near Falmouth. She lives with a serious condition called Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (a progressive lung condition) and also cares for her husband who has COPD. She said “Living with a long term condition is part of your life’s journey and only you are living with it. Supported by health professionals, it’s important to be actively involved in taking responsibility for managing and maintaining your own health.

“Signposting to support groups and exercise sessions should be readily available so that patients can take responsibility. Being proactive, we accessed groups such as Breathe Falmouth and British Lung Foundation resources (which are readily available), having researched these for ourselves. By doing this and using social media support of Action for Pulmonary Fibrosis and Pulmonary Fibrosis UK on Facebook, we have great social, psychological and physical benefits from them. I’d urge anyone eligible to take part and have your say.”

Take part to help us understand and improve services by completing the online survey. Printed copies are available on request. The survey will be open until 12 noon on 12 January 2018.

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Safer Cornwall are a working partnership involving: