Who will you spend Christmas with? A Paramedic, a Firefighter, a street pastor or even a Police Officer?

December 12th, 2017 by

This festive season, as many of us drink more than intended, a new campaign is urging people to think about how and who they want to spend their Christmas with.

The Safer Cornwall partnership festive safe drinking campaign asks people out enjoying festivities over the coming weeks to drink sensibly while enjoying Cornwall and Christmas, not to risk spending time somewhere they would rather not be – whether in a police cell or a hospital.

Drinking too much can impact on our already stretched services such as the NHS and Police force. Those services will be more than happy to help if you really need it, but they don’t really want to spend time with you because you’ve had too much to drink.

Sally Hawken, Cornwall Council Cabinet member for Wellbeing and Public Health said: “Drinking more than normal can bring on a false sense of confidence. This can lead to bad choices or decisions, such as drink driving or getting into arguments and fights. In a few cases, this can lead to people ending up in hospital, losing their drivers licence, getting fined, being arrested, or having accidents which put themselves or other people in danger”.

“The Council and its partners hope everyone enjoys the festive season. People should rightly be able to have fun, but we also want people to be safe. This campaign reminds people to drink sensibly, and to plan how they’ll get home safely.”

Jez Bayes, Alcohol strategy lead for Cornwall Council’s Drug and Alcohol Action Team said: “We don’t want to be the Christmas Grinch and say that you shouldn’t drink at all, because we know that for most of us that’s not going to happen! What we’re asking is that people go out and have fun in a way that doesn’t impact on others, or potentially affect their own future.

Top tips to enjoy Cornwall and drink sensibly this festive season:

  • Alternate alcoholic drinks with soft drinks or water
  • It’s safest to stick drinks you’re familiar with, so that you know how you will react
  • Keep an eye on your drink when out, and don’t get to the point where you wouldn’t notice if someone spiked you
  • Plan how you will get home – book a taxi in advance, organise a lift, or have a designated driver in your group
  • Don’t attempt to reason with people who have drunk too much
  • Say thanks to anyone out there to keep you safe: door staff, street pastors, police, paramedics

 

Copy of the Festive Drinking Posters

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Festive drinking tips for young people !

December 6th, 2017 by

In the coming festive period, if you are going to drink more than usual (and you know you shouldn’t, but be honest now – you just might!) Please consider these tips to keep yourself safe. Have fun this Christmas! Have a great time letting your hair down with friends over a drink if you like – but follow these top tips for young people to stay safe.

If you know any young people who may need this advice please pass it on to them!

 

 

Top Tips

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Addaction HOT team has arrived…

October 30th, 2017 by

Addaction HOT team has arrived…

RCHT now has Addaction outreach workers within its safeguarding team, supporting patients with alcohol and drug addiction.  The Addaction Hospital Outreach Team (HOT) consists of two workers: Joanne Sutcliffe and Lee Derrick. Jo and Lee are managed by Addaction Operational manager Lynda Edward.

The Addaction HOT team is working in partnership with the Alcohol Liaison Team, the Psychiatric Liaison Team, Adult Safeguarding and Shelter to focus on individuals who are attending for multiple admissions at RCH in an attempt to identify and address the reasons behind their serial admissions.

Amongst those individuals with multiple presentations is a cohort of people with severe and enduring alcohol and drug problems. The HOT Team aims to identify, with the help of ALT and Safeguarding within the hospital, those individuals and to provide intensive multi-agency care packages to prevent further harm to the individual and minimise, where possible, attendance at the hospital.

The HOT Team also works to bridge the gap between home, community and the hospital to ensure individuals with complex needs are adequately supported. The team’s work has included work with the Palliative Care Service, liaison with Safeguarding and Mental Health Service, liaison with the Specialist Midwifery Team and the Independent Domestic Violence Advocacy (IDVA) service.

The HOT team would like to thank the RCHT wards for the support that they have shown both of them in their new role.  You can read more on Jo and Lee in the full article on the Royal Cornwall Hospitals Website HERE

Joanne Sutcliffe  – Tel: 07973789348 email: jo.sutcliffe1@nhs.net
or joanne.sutcliffe@addaction.org.uk

Lee Derrick – Tel: 07580833895 email: lee.derrick@nhs.net or
lee.derrick@addaction.org.uk

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International Overdose Awareness Day

October 2nd, 2017 by

International Overdose Awareness Day (IOAD) is a global event held on August 31 each year and aims to raise awareness of overdose and reduce the stigma of a drug-related death. It also acknowledges the grief felt by families and friends remembering those who have met with death or permanent injury as a result of drug overdose.

Overdose Day spreads the message that the tragedy of overdose death is preventable.

Taking its key themes as prevention and remembrance, its goals are:

  • To provide an opportunity for people to publicly mourn for loved ones, some for the first time, without feeling guilt or shame.
  • To include the greatest number of people in Overdose Awareness Day events, and encourage non-denominational involvement.
  • To give community members information about the issue of fatal and non- fatal overdose.
  • To send a strong message to current and former drug users that they are valued.
  • To stimulate discussion about overdose prevention and drug policy.
  • To provide basic information on the range of support services that exists in the local community.
  • To prevent and reduce drug-related harm by supporting evidence-based policy and practice.
  • To remind all of the risks of overdose.

On 31 August 2017 the Cornwall Drug and Alcohol Action Team and Addaction (drug and alcohol treatment service) held an event on Lemon Quay, Truro to take these key themes to the public. The event ran from 9:00am to 4:30pm and consisted of staff from Addaction and DAAT engaging with as many people as possible. This included handing out information leaflets/posters, giving a range of advice and first aid training including ‘hands on’ resuscitation practice.

With 32 people dying in Cornwall in 2016 from a drug related death and many more dying from alcohol and prescription medicine abuse, this was an opportunity to talk about the many complexities surrounding drug and alcohol use.

A wide cross section of people engaged with the team including those who needed treatment, those seeking treatment for others, wider education issues and children wishing to learn first aid skills- the first aiders of the future!

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Preparing to update Cornwall’s Alcohol Strategy

October 14th, 2015 by

Every year we have a look to see what impact Alcohol has on Cornwall. This year’s Alcohol Needs Assessment can be found here:
CORNWALL & ISLES OF SCILLY ALCOHOL NEEDS ASSESSMENT 2014/15

This year’s is particularly important, because we are just about to update our Alcohol Strategy, outlining all the actions we are taking to address alcohol related harm in Cornwall.

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We have 3 overall local objectives:
1: To enable people to make informed choices about alcohol; we aim to help people in Cornwall to become better informed about responsible drinking and safe alcohol intake levels, by giving relevant advice, information and support in order to reduce alcohol related harm.

2: To improve services to reduce the harm caused by alcohol; we aim to reduce the risk of alcohol related harm to individuals and families by improving effective alcohol services in the community, in the NHS and hospitals, in the voluntary sector and in the Criminal Justice System, in order to reduce alcohol related hospital admissions and support recovery from problematic alcohol use.

3: To promote partnerships to reduce alcohol’s impact on the community; we aim to work effectively in partnerships to promote best practice around safe alcohol retail, maintaining safe localities and communities, and to have well planned responses to alcohol related issues with the long term goal of reducing disruption to the community.

These objectives will be delivered across eight areas:
1: Advice and Information
2: Children, Young People, Parents and Families
3: Community Safety Schemes
4: Criminal Justice Interventions
5: Domestic abuse and sexual violence
6: Employment, Deprivation and Inclusion
7: Health, Treatment, Aftercare and Recovery
8: Licensing, alcohol retail and the Night Time Economy

When the strategy has been updated it will be publicised on the Safer Cornwall website and elsewhere.

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Safer Cornwall are a working partnership involving: