Party Time???!!!

December 7th, 2018 by

As we rush through December, with the decorations up, and all the Christmas shopping dilemmas becoming far too urgent, we also land in Christmas Party time!

This is obviously a moment to enjoy celebrating with your friends, family and colleagues, and to let off some end of year steam.

However, all of this comes with some issues to be aware of …

In a crowded bar or house, where it’s loud and you don’t know everyone, it becomes even more important than usual to keep your eyes on your drink, and stay alert to your own safety.

So firstly, we’d like to remind you about advice we gave out recently around spiking, how to stay safe, and what to do as soon as you think someone’s drink has been spiked.

Tips on keeping yourself safe from spiking can be found by clicking here

And more advice about how to stay alert and how trespond can be found here

All of this is summarised in this helpful ‘What Will Your Drink Cost?’ leaflet.

If you’re drinking from a bottle, ask the bar staff if they have any spikies, which make it impossible for someone to tamper with your drink.


Secondly, plan your journey home before you go out.

Pre-book a Taxi?

Or agree a driver for the evening?

If it’s your turn to be the designated driver, make sure your passengers know that your soft drinks are on them for the night, but remember that you can also make use of the supply of free water the bar can give you. (Just add ice, a straw, a slice of lime, and accessorise to make that water go incognito – if that’s an issue for you.) 

Remember that your body processes alcohol at about 1 unit per hour, so if you drink 5 Pints, it will take you over 12 hours to be under the drink driving limit.


Thirdly, know your own limits with alcohol and don’t imagine that you gain a December Drinking SuperPower that means that you can withstand any unknown exotic combination of mysteriously unpronounceable drinks!

Respect your body – including your head the next day – and stick to normal amounts of what you are used to.

You’ll thank yourself tomorrow!


Fourthly, if people around you get too lively in the wrong way, consider your own safety before trying to become the UN peacekeeping force.

Generally, reasoning with drunk strangers is more likely to get you into trouble than get them out of it.

Walk Away!

Finally, here’s a full sheet of tips for a Safe Night Out

If you find yourself needing advice or support for an alcohol issue for yourself or someone you know, call:

Addaction Cornwall, on 0333 2000 325


And here’s a reminder of the recommended safe alcohol levels.

Your body still works this way in the festive season!

And above all, have a Great Time!!!

Weekly Alcohol Guidelines

 

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National Burn Awareness Day

September 27th, 2018 by

National Burn Awareness Day 2018

17 October.

A burn injury is for life. The scars are physical as well as psychological, and can present life-long challenges for the individual and their families.  What many people don’t know is that children and the elderly are the most vulnerable, and the majority of injuries occur as a result of an accident that could so easily have been prevented.

In 2017, 7,502 children were burned or scalded. Hot drinks are the most common cause of scald injury in children – followed by contact with electric cookers, irons and hair straighteners.

First Aid

Treat burns with cold running water for 20 minutesGood first aid following a burn or scald can make an enormous difference in recovery times and the severity of scarring.

Two important things to remember are:

Cool, Call, Cover

  1. Cool the burn with running cold tap water for 20 minutes and remove all clothing and jewellery (unless it is melted or firmly stuck to the wound)
  2. Call for help – 999, 111 or local GP for advice
  3. Cover with cling film or a sterile, non-fluffy dressing or cloth. Make sure the patient is kept warm

Stop, Drop, roll

“Stop, drop and roll” is used when clothing catches fire. Children can get confused about when to stop, drop and roll. It is important to know when to do this. Children who do not have a good understanding of stop, drop and roll will sometimes do this if they burn a finger or need to get outside if the smoke alarm sounds. Only use stop, drop and roll when clothing catches fire.

Find out more how to prevent burns HERE

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Drink Spiking

September 25th, 2018 by

How to stay alert, and how to respond:

As reported widely in the local and national media, a drink spiking incident in Falmouth is now being investigated by The Police.

If you become aware of such an incident, please follow this advice given by Devon and Cornwall Police, and take these actions swiftly:

“Report it to the police as soon as you can. They will need to take blood and urine samples. Most drugs leave the body within 72 hours of being taken, but some can be gone in 12 hours so it’s important to be tested as soon as possible.

If you have been sexually assaulted, even if you are too upset to report it to the police immediately, you should try to seek medical assistance if you have been hurt or injured. Any forensic evidence obtained during tests can be stored.”

https://www.devon-cornwall.police.uk/advice/your-community/drugs-and-alcohol/alcohol/drink-spiking/

“If you begin to feel really drunk after only a couple of drinks, get help from a trusted friend or a member of staff from the club or pub management.

Stay away from situations that you do not feel comfortable with.

Remember that alcohol can affect your actions and reactions as well as reduce your ability to be alert – alcohol is the most common date rape drug.

https://www.devon-cornwall.police.uk/advice/your-personal-safety/staying-safe-while-out-for-the-night/

Please be alert, enjoy Cornwall safely, and report anything that concerns you to The Police.

Who to call for help:

Police:

Call 999

If you are in danger, please dial 999 immediately or 101 in a non-emergency.

If you ring 999 but can’t talk, make sure the Police know you are there by coughing or tapping the handset, or by dialling 55.

Cornwall Reach Hub

Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence Helpline:

0300 777 4777  

 

 

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Drug and alcohol services for adults and young people

April 10th, 2018 by

Addaction to continue to deliver Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly community drug and alcohol services for adults and young people

Addaction is to continue delivery of alcohol and drug services across Cornwall for the next five years.

The national charity has been delivering the services in the county for the past five years to both adults and young people, and has been successful in retaining the contract with Cornwall Council.

The budget for alcohol and drug treatment reduces by £120,000 in 18/19 and to a total of £451,000 by March 2020, so we are pleased that we had a high quality successful bid to deliver these services to Cornwall & the Isles of Scilly.

Addaction has bases in Redruth, Penzance, St Austell, Liskeard, Bodmin and Truro – where the YZUP service is also based.

The charity provides free, confidential and non-judgmental support to anyone affected by their own or someone else’s alcohol or drug use.

Associate director James Sainsbury said: “We’re delighted to continue our work in Cornwall and I want to congratulate the whole team on our excellent work.”

During the past five years, Addaction Cornwall and Isles of Scilly has supported 6,047 different adults and is currently treating 1,899 adults in the county.

Addaction has also been successful in securing funding of £780,000 from the Government’s Life Chances Fund to set up a project in Cornwall to cut the number of people frequently attending the hospital A&E departments due to alcohol or drugs.

Known as ‘frequent attenders’, there is a group of people who take up a disproportionate amount of time, resources and finances for hospital A&E departments because of their regular attendance due to alcohol or drug use.

Addaction will be using a combination of assertive outreach, high intensity work and partnership work to get this group to address their use and attend less.

“Around 35% of A&E admissions are down to alcohol and by tackling the frequent attenders we can help the hospital free up their resources to help others. The work will involve linking in with people from housing, the police, the council and other professionals to make sure we’re addressing all their needs and issues at once,” said James Sainsbury.

The project will be launched thanks to the Life Chances grant which is used to set up a social impact bond that will continue to fund the project outcomes. To date Addaction has been awarded the largest contribution for it from Life Chances.

Addaction is the first substance misuse charity in the UK to run a social impact bond and the Cornwall project will be watched with interest by officials and researchers to see if it will work elsewhere in the country.

A pilot project has been running in Treliske A&E and it will officially launch with an extended service from April 1st.

James Sainsbury said: “No service in the UK has been able to fully address the issue of frequent attenders before. We’re hopeful this innovative approach will significantly improve the lives of this group of people and give a new way forward for other services across the country.”

Minister for sport and civil society, Tracey Crouch, said: ‘This funding will benefit some of the most vulnerable people in society and provide vital support to help them transform their lives.

‘The UK is a world leader in using social impact bonds to make a positive impact in society and these projects will achieve real results in communities across the country.’

The Government Outcomes Laboratory (GoLab) based at Oxford University will be monitoring the effectiveness of this project as a funding model for care services.

To find out more about Addaction visit www.addaction.org.uk where you can also access a free, confidential web chat facility.

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The Time Credits

April 10th, 2018 by

The Time Credits model is very simple: for every hour that an individual gives to their community or service, they earn one ‘Time Credit’. People can spend Time Credits to access events, training and leisure activities provided by public, community and private organisations, or to thank others in turn. To date, over 35,000 people have earned almost half a million Time Credits across England and Wales. The Time Credits currency is a powerful tool for encouraging more active engagement in local services and community groups, and building an individual’s social or support network.

Embedding Time Credits in substance use and recovery services has been a successful development in both England and Wales.  The Time Credits are used as the catalyst for an asset based approach to support planning and service design, and enable the development of co-produced services where clients take an active rather than passive role.

How do Time Credits work?

 

There are a huge variety of skills, experience and resources in communities that can be forgotten or go unrecognised, and Time Credits believe taking these as a starting point for any service or activity can be the most effective way of tackling community challenges. Time Credits start by mapping local assets with local people and identifying what exists in communities that can be built on, developed or brought together in new ways. Time Credits build on people’s interests, skills and experiences, combined with local physical assets and resources, to develop and improve community and public services.

There are currently over 600 spend opportunities nationwide. These spend partnerships facilitate access to opportunities that are often inaccessible to vulnerable adults with complex conditions and often low incomes. This access stimulates habitual change and helps develop personal assets further. Many positive impacts from spending Time Credits come from engaging in health or wellbeing activity, or adult education opportunities. However another key impact, particularly where we work with more vulnerable and isolated individuals, is a reduction in anxiety and increased confidence and awareness of the community assets available to them.

 

Time Credits in Cornwall

 

Time Credits Cornwall is a joint project between CC Transformation Challenge Award that is now operational within the DAAT and community partner agencies. The project is managed by Beth Ward who has a base at both DAAT in Threemilestones and Job Centre Plus in Penzance, enabling her to split her time between the two areas. The partnership managers, Helen Smith and Kelly Taylor share the role of building the spend network, identifying potential partnerships from feedback received through workshops and discussions with our local groups and members.

A key aspect of the Time Credit programmes is creating a local Time Credits identity. Co-design sessions involving DAAT, local services and service users helped create a bespoke note, reflecting the local identity of Cornwall. The back of every note is the same so that individuals are able to spend their Time Credits across the national network of partners. This aspect of Time Credits enables participants to use Time Credits outside their own area, for trips or family outings, and feel part of a wider national cohort of Time Credits members.

Time Credits are excited to already be working with Addaction, YMCA Cornwall, Bosence Farm, Who Dares Works, Trengweath, Job Centre Plus and Homegroup and will be looking to develop further relationships and spend/earn opportunities with local groups and services as the project develops. A launch event for Time Credits at Homegroup is being held on April 20th at YMCA Cornwall. We plan to host a range of earn and spend opportunities, including an asset mapping session with volunteers and residents followed by circuit training sessions organised by local social enterprise, The Ark CIC.

Time Credits are initially focusing on Drug and Alcohol and Homelessness Services in Penzance but will be moving into other substance use services in Cornwall, and eventually into other thematic settings supporting vulnerable adults.

In addition to the implementation of Time Credits, Time Credits have a range of training and supporting resources that have been tried and tested in community and health and care settings, to enable organisations to develop and embed asset based ways of working. They will be facilitating training sessions starting in the next quarter, for staff, volunteers and community members in voluntary organisations, statutory services and community groups in Cornwall and you are invited to attend. Further details will be circulated by DAAT once dates have been confirmed.

If you wish to find out more, please feel free to get in touch:

Beth Ward | 07578181277 | bethanyward@justaddspice.org

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Don’t Drink and Drown

April 2nd, 2018 by

Falmouth Blue Watch, Cornwall Fire, Rescue and Community Safety Service in collaboration Devon & Cornwall Police and partners launched the Royal Life Saving Society (RLSS) ‘Don’t Drink and Drown’ campaign on 6th December 2017 in Falmouth at the Custom House Quay.  Don’t Drink and Drown is a national campaign that warns drinkers to steer clear of walking by or entering water when under the influence of alcohol.  The campaign was launched following a string of tragic student drownings and supported by Falmouth safety campaigner Paige Winsper whose brother Josh drowned after her fell into a harbour following a night out.

The campaign was supported by Cornwall Fire, Rescue & Community Safety Service, Devon & Cornwall Police, RLSS, Falmouth RNLI, the Marine Coastguard, Cornwall Search and Rescue and the Falmouth Harbour Commissioner to raise awareness of the dangers of being under the influence of alcohol when near water and to train staff to recognise the signs, encourage safer behaviour around the quay side and what to do in an emergency if someone enters the water.

Falmouth is a thriving student town which hosts waterfront and quayside pubs including the Chain Locker, Quayside, Stable, Warehouse, The Front, retail establishment Trago Mills and the Harbour Commissioner.  In total 18 staff from local businesses and 16 from partner agencies were trained by an RNLI Line Rescue Instructor in the safe use of throw lines should they be required in an emergency in a bid to reduce the number of alcohol related drowning deaths.

We worked with the establishments to raise awareness:

• All bar staff from each venue wore lanyards and had wristbands and T-Shirts to reiterate the ‘Don’t Drink and Drown’ message talking to drinkers to remind them of the risks of going near water after consuming alcohol.

• Don’t Drink and Drown posters were displayed on that back of all bathroom doors in the bars located at the waterfront and quayside displaying.

• Drinkers were encouraged to take Don’t Drink and Drown merchandised selfies to share the messages on social media.

• The management from every venue and resolve security signed the pledge to support the campaign.

• We encouraged the University to display posters on campus, played the Don’t Drink and Drown film and shared information on social media throughout the campaign.

·         Using a social media platform to promote the campaign provided the opportunity to communicate our safety messages to our audience in an innovative approach.

• Information handouts in Falmouth

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Who will you spend Christmas with? A Paramedic, a Firefighter, a street pastor or even a Police Officer?

December 12th, 2017 by

This festive season, as many of us drink more than intended, a new campaign is urging people to think about how and who they want to spend their Christmas with.

The Safer Cornwall partnership festive safe drinking campaign asks people out enjoying festivities over the coming weeks to drink sensibly while enjoying Cornwall and Christmas, not to risk spending time somewhere they would rather not be – whether in a police cell or a hospital.

Drinking too much can impact on our already stretched services such as the NHS and Police force. Those services will be more than happy to help if you really need it, but they don’t really want to spend time with you because you’ve had too much to drink.

Sally Hawken, Cornwall Council Cabinet member for Wellbeing and Public Health said: “Drinking more than normal can bring on a false sense of confidence. This can lead to bad choices or decisions, such as drink driving or getting into arguments and fights. In a few cases, this can lead to people ending up in hospital, losing their drivers licence, getting fined, being arrested, or having accidents which put themselves or other people in danger”.

“The Council and its partners hope everyone enjoys the festive season. People should rightly be able to have fun, but we also want people to be safe. This campaign reminds people to drink sensibly, and to plan how they’ll get home safely.”

Jez Bayes, Alcohol strategy lead for Cornwall Council’s Drug and Alcohol Action Team said: “We don’t want to be the Christmas Grinch and say that you shouldn’t drink at all, because we know that for most of us that’s not going to happen! What we’re asking is that people go out and have fun in a way that doesn’t impact on others, or potentially affect their own future.

Top tips to enjoy Cornwall and drink sensibly this festive season:

  • Alternate alcoholic drinks with soft drinks or water
  • It’s safest to stick drinks you’re familiar with, so that you know how you will react
  • Keep an eye on your drink when out, and don’t get to the point where you wouldn’t notice if someone spiked you
  • Plan how you will get home – book a taxi in advance, organise a lift, or have a designated driver in your group
  • Don’t attempt to reason with people who have drunk too much
  • Say thanks to anyone out there to keep you safe: door staff, street pastors, police, paramedics

 

Copy of the Festive Drinking Posters

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Festive drinking tips for young people !

December 6th, 2017 by

In the coming festive period, if you are going to drink more than usual (and you know you shouldn’t, but be honest now – you just might!) Please consider these tips to keep yourself safe. Have fun this Christmas! Have a great time letting your hair down with friends over a drink if you like – but follow these top tips for young people to stay safe.

If you know any young people who may need this advice please pass it on to them!

 

 

Top Tips

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Addaction HOT team has arrived…

October 30th, 2017 by

Addaction HOT team has arrived…

RCHT now has Addaction outreach workers within its safeguarding team, supporting patients with alcohol and drug addiction.  The Addaction Hospital Outreach Team (HOT) consists of two workers: Joanne Sutcliffe and Lee Derrick. Jo and Lee are managed by Addaction Operational manager Lynda Edward.

The Addaction HOT team is working in partnership with the Alcohol Liaison Team, the Psychiatric Liaison Team, Adult Safeguarding and Shelter to focus on individuals who are attending for multiple admissions at RCH in an attempt to identify and address the reasons behind their serial admissions.

Amongst those individuals with multiple presentations is a cohort of people with severe and enduring alcohol and drug problems. The HOT Team aims to identify, with the help of ALT and Safeguarding within the hospital, those individuals and to provide intensive multi-agency care packages to prevent further harm to the individual and minimise, where possible, attendance at the hospital.

The HOT Team also works to bridge the gap between home, community and the hospital to ensure individuals with complex needs are adequately supported. The team’s work has included work with the Palliative Care Service, liaison with Safeguarding and Mental Health Service, liaison with the Specialist Midwifery Team and the Independent Domestic Violence Advocacy (IDVA) service.

The HOT team would like to thank the RCHT wards for the support that they have shown both of them in their new role.  You can read more on Jo and Lee in the full article on the Royal Cornwall Hospitals Website HERE

Joanne Sutcliffe  – Tel: 07973789348 email: jo.sutcliffe1@nhs.net
or joanne.sutcliffe@addaction.org.uk

Lee Derrick – Tel: 07580833895 email: lee.derrick@nhs.net or
lee.derrick@addaction.org.uk

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International Overdose Awareness Day

October 2nd, 2017 by

International Overdose Awareness Day (IOAD) is a global event held on August 31 each year and aims to raise awareness of overdose and reduce the stigma of a drug-related death. It also acknowledges the grief felt by families and friends remembering those who have met with death or permanent injury as a result of drug overdose.

Overdose Day spreads the message that the tragedy of overdose death is preventable.

Taking its key themes as prevention and remembrance, its goals are:

  • To provide an opportunity for people to publicly mourn for loved ones, some for the first time, without feeling guilt or shame.
  • To include the greatest number of people in Overdose Awareness Day events, and encourage non-denominational involvement.
  • To give community members information about the issue of fatal and non- fatal overdose.
  • To send a strong message to current and former drug users that they are valued.
  • To stimulate discussion about overdose prevention and drug policy.
  • To provide basic information on the range of support services that exists in the local community.
  • To prevent and reduce drug-related harm by supporting evidence-based policy and practice.
  • To remind all of the risks of overdose.

On 31 August 2017 the Cornwall Drug and Alcohol Action Team and Addaction (drug and alcohol treatment service) held an event on Lemon Quay, Truro to take these key themes to the public. The event ran from 9:00am to 4:30pm and consisted of staff from Addaction and DAAT engaging with as many people as possible. This included handing out information leaflets/posters, giving a range of advice and first aid training including ‘hands on’ resuscitation practice.

With 32 people dying in Cornwall in 2016 from a drug related death and many more dying from alcohol and prescription medicine abuse, this was an opportunity to talk about the many complexities surrounding drug and alcohol use.

A wide cross section of people engaged with the team including those who needed treatment, those seeking treatment for others, wider education issues and children wishing to learn first aid skills- the first aiders of the future!

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Safer Cornwall are a working partnership involving: