Cornwall Licensing Policy update

February 6th, 2019 by

On January 22nd, after being proposed by the Cornwall Licensing Act Committee, Cornwall Council voted in an updated Alcohol Licensing Policy Statement. This will now be in place for the next 5 years, setting the tone for how alcohol should be sold in Cornwall.

This new policy, which can be seen in full here, embeds some important work that has been undertaken by Cornwall’s Public Health and Community Safety teams in the last 3 years.

Local Authority Public Health Departments have been a Licensing Responsible Authority since 2012, but nationally had relatively little input into Licensing cases and culture.

This gap was addressed by Public Health England (PHE) in the initial Local Alcohol Action Areas and then in their ‘Health as a Licensing Objective’ (HaLO) pilot schemes.

Cornwall was invited by PHE to participate in the 2016-17 HaLO pilot scheme, and we created a postcode responsive tool that can help to quickly assess the alcohol related risks in any given area.

 

This HaLO tool, now renamed the ‘Health Impact Licensing Tool’ (HILT) has been seen as a national example of good practice, used in PHE webinars, presented to the Local Government Association and the House of Lords Licensing Committee, and to the academic ‘United Kingdom Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies’ (UKCTAS).

The HILT tool has been used operationally to evaluate Cornwall’s Cumulative Impact Zones, and to contribute contextual evidence to a License revocation case against a premises in a violent hotspot within a Cumulative Impact Zone.

After a draft and consultation led by Julie Flower of CC Licensing team, the new Cornwall 5 year Licensing Policy Statement was voted through unopposed by full Council yesterday 22/01/19.

 

From a Public Health and Community Safety perspective, this policy:

  1. Embeds work done in the last 3 years,
  2. Puts these achievements into written policy, and
  3. Makes them a standard part of Cornwall Licensing policy and culture for the next 5 years.

This includes:

  • Public Health as a standard aspect of Licensing and alcohol retail (p6-7);
  • National guidance on responsible drinking, which can then be used to critique irresponsible drink promotions (p7);
  • The 10 Safer Towns initiative to address wider issues (p10);
  • ‘What Will Your Drink Cost?’ as an ongoing available flexible targeted messaging brand and campaign (p10);
  • Cumulative Impact Policies and mapping (p11 and 47);
  • The protection of children from harm (p21 and 66);
  • Public Health as a Responsible Authority (p49-51), including:
    • Alcohol Related Hospital Admissions;
    • The impact of alcohol in Cornwall;
    • HILT – The ‘Health Impact Licensing Tool’;
    • ARID – The ‘Assault Related Injuries Database’; and
    • Alcohol retail quality standards.
  • Drugs policies (p59-60), and
  • The responsibility of premises to have a supply of ‘spikies’ to raise awareness and keep customers safe (p65).

This now normalises pilot work that has been undertaken by the DAAT, Public Health, Safer Cornwall and Amethyst Community Safety Intelligence, allowing it to have long term application and impact in Licensing and Alcohol retail in Cornwall.

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Cornwall’s 2018 festive alcohol safety messaging …

February 6th, 2019 by

Over Christmas and New Year, a series of alcohol responsibility messages went out under the hashtags #CornwallChristmas and #CornwallPartyTime

These were all based on messages in the campaign webpage “Party Time”.

The themes covered were the lack of a December Drinking Superpower, having a Safe Night Out, Drink Driving facts, precautions against spiking for customers and Bars, walking away from trouble rather than becoming an imaginary drunk UN, all promoted under the long running Safer Cornwall message of ‘What Will Your Drink Cost?’


The messages were picked up on the Alcohol Strategy Facebook and Twitter feeds, as well as the Cornwall Council and Public Health social media.

The most widely read posts were this drink driving Facebook message, this ‘Walk Away‘ Twitter post, and this Spiking message.

The spiking messages also picked up a lot of views on the Cornwall Council Social Media.

Overall, the messages reached a total of about 40,000 hits, highlighted the issues people are most concerned about, and have given us pointers for this year’s messages.

 

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Party Time???!!!

December 7th, 2018 by

As we rush through December, with the decorations up, and all the Christmas shopping dilemmas becoming far too urgent, we also land in Christmas Party time!

This is obviously a moment to enjoy celebrating with your friends, family and colleagues, and to let off some end of year steam.

However, all of this comes with some issues to be aware of …

In a crowded bar or house, where it’s loud and you don’t know everyone, it becomes even more important than usual to keep your eyes on your drink, and stay alert to your own safety.

So firstly, we’d like to remind you about advice we gave out recently around spiking, how to stay safe, and what to do as soon as you think someone’s drink has been spiked.

Tips on keeping yourself safe from spiking can be found by clicking here

And more advice about how to stay alert and how trespond can be found here

All of this is summarised in this helpful ‘What Will Your Drink Cost?’ leaflet.

If you’re drinking from a bottle, ask the bar staff if they have any spikies, which make it impossible for someone to tamper with your drink.

(See more info at the end of this page.)


Secondly, plan your journey home before you go out.

Pre-book a Taxi?

Or agree a driver for the evening?

If it’s your turn to be the designated driver, make sure your passengers know that your soft drinks are on them for the night, but remember that you can also make use of the supply of free water the bar can give you. (Just add ice, a straw, a slice of lime, and accessorise to make that water go incognito – if that’s an issue for you.) 

Remember that your body processes alcohol at about 1 unit per hour, so if you drink 5 Pints, it will take you over 12 hours to be under the drink driving limit.


Thirdly, know your own limits with alcohol and don’t imagine that you gain a December Drinking SuperPower that means that you can withstand any unknown exotic combination of mysteriously unpronounceable drinks!

Respect your body – including your head the next day – and stick to normal amounts of what you are used to.

You’ll thank yourself tomorrow!


Fourthly, if people around you get too lively in the wrong way, consider your own safety before trying to become the UN peacekeeping force.

Generally, reasoning with drunk strangers is more likely to get you into trouble than get them out of it.

Walk Away!

Finally, here’s a full sheet of tips for a Safe Night Out

If you find yourself needing advice or support for an alcohol issue for yourself or someone you know, call:

Addaction Cornwall, on 0333 2000 325


And here’s a reminder of the recommended safe alcohol levels.

Your body still works this way in the festive season!

And above all, have a Great Time!!!

Weekly Alcohol Guidelines

 

Additional advice on responding to spiking incidents:

Report anything you think has happened to The Police or the Cornwall Sexual Violence Helpline as soon as you can.

The Police or a Doctor will need to take blood and urine samples. Most drugs leave the body within 72 hours of being taken, but some can be gone in 12 hours so it’s important to be tested as soon as possible.

If you have been sexually assaulted, even if you are too upset to report it to the police immediately, you should try to seek medical assistance if you have been hurt or injured. Any forensic evidence obtained during tests can be stored.

https://www.devon-cornwall.police.uk/advice/your-community/drugs-and-alcohol/alcohol/drink-spiking/

If you begin to feel really drunk after only a couple of drinks, get help from a trusted friend or a member of staff from the club or pub management.

Stay away from situations that you do not feel comfortable with.

Remember that alcohol can affect your actions and reactions as well as reduce your ability to be alert.

https://www.devon-cornwall.police.uk/advice/your-personal-safety/staying-safe-while-out-for-the-night/

Who to call for help:

Police:

If you are in danger, please dial 999 immediately or 101 in a non-emergency.

If you ring 999 but can’t talk, make sure the Police know you are there by coughing or tapping the handset, or by dialling 55.

Cornwall Sexual Violence Helpline: 0300 777 4777

More advice from the NHS:
https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/healthy-body/drink-spiking-and-date-rape-drugs/

Follow #cornwallpartytime on Fb and Twitter

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Keep Safe From Drink Spiking:

November 7th, 2018 by

Here is a leaflet with advice about keeping yourself safe from drink spiking, or what to do if you think someone has done this to you or someone else:

https://safercornwall.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/WWYDC2018.pdf

 

Advice:

  • Always keep an eye on your drink.
  • Be careful accepting drinks, especially from people you don’t know.
  • Watch your drink being served.
  • Ask staff at the bar if they have ‘spikeys’, which make your drink more safe. Consider keeping one with you.
  • If your drink tastes odd, or if you begin to feel really drunk after only a couple of drinks, get help from a trusted friend or a member of staff from the bar management.
  • Leave or stay away from situations or people that you don’t feel comfortable with.
  • If you become aware of an incident, report it to the Police quickly.
  • They will help you to get a drug test as soon as possible, within 12 hours, before the substance leaves your body. This is important evidence that will help them find who did it to you, and prevent it happening to other people.
  • Seek medical help as soon as possible if you have been injured or sexually assaulted. If you are reluctant to go straight to the Police, start by getting medical help, or phone the Cornwall Helpline (see below).
  • Remember that alcohol can affect your actions and reactions as well as reducing your ability to be alert.

Who to call for help:

Police:
If you are in danger, please dial 999 immediately or 101 in a non-emergency.

If you ring 999 but can’t talk, make sure the Police know you are there by coughing or tapping the handset, or by dialling 55.

Cornwall Sexual Violence Helpline:
0300 777 4777

More advice from the NHS: https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/healthy-body/drink-spiking-and-date-rape-drugs/

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Drink Spiking

September 25th, 2018 by

How to stay alert, and how to respond:

As reported widely in the local and national media, a drink spiking incident in Falmouth is now being investigated by The Police.

If you become aware of such an incident, please follow this advice given by Devon and Cornwall Police, and take these actions swiftly:

“Report it to the police as soon as you can. They will need to take blood and urine samples. Most drugs leave the body within 72 hours of being taken, but some can be gone in 12 hours so it’s important to be tested as soon as possible.

If you have been sexually assaulted, even if you are too upset to report it to the police immediately, you should try to seek medical assistance if you have been hurt or injured. Any forensic evidence obtained during tests can be stored.”

https://www.devon-cornwall.police.uk/advice/your-community/drugs-and-alcohol/alcohol/drink-spiking/

“If you begin to feel really drunk after only a couple of drinks, get help from a trusted friend or a member of staff from the club or pub management.

Stay away from situations that you do not feel comfortable with.

Remember that alcohol can affect your actions and reactions as well as reduce your ability to be alert – alcohol is the most common date rape drug.

https://www.devon-cornwall.police.uk/advice/your-personal-safety/staying-safe-while-out-for-the-night/

Please be alert, enjoy Cornwall safely, and report anything that concerns you to The Police.

Who to call for help:

Police:

Call 999

If you are in danger, please dial 999 immediately or 101 in a non-emergency.

If you ring 999 but can’t talk, make sure the Police know you are there by coughing or tapping the handset, or by dialling 55.

Cornwall Reach Hub

Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence Helpline:

0300 777 4777  

 

 

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Workshop Presentations: Reducing Drug Related Deaths

August 4th, 2017 by

SOUTH WEST REDUCING DRUG-RELATED DEATH CONFERENCE 2017

PRESENTATION:

1: Transform: Anyone’s Child
Nicky Saunter

TRANSFORM-Anyones Child

 

WORKSHOPS:

1: RCHT Alcohol Liaison team: Frequent Attenders
Toni Edwards, Hannah Parsonage and Jenna Brickley

Worlshop 1 – ALT Cornwall Hospital

 

2: Recognising and responding to service users who are high risk of sudden death

Workshop 2 – Presentation EOL china.pptx version 2

 

3: Street Outreach: A positive approach

Workshop 3 – Street Outreach

 

4: Creative Solutions
Or how collaboration and cooperation reduces risk and enables bespoke solutions for people with complex lives

Workshop 4 – Creative Solutions drug related death conference

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Amanda Clements: Hepatitis C – towards eradication

August 4th, 2017 by

SOUTH WEST REDUCING DRUG-RELATED DEATH CONFERENCE 2017

Main Session 5

6. AClementsHeader

 

 

 

For the presentation, click here:

6. Hepatitis C towards eradication

Video:

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Paul Hayes: Taking Responsibility (‘Collective Voice’)

August 4th, 2017 by

SOUTH WEST REDUCING DRUG-RELATED DEATH CONFERENCE 2017

Main Session 4

4. PHayesHeader

 

 

For the presentation, click here:

4. Paul Hayes presentation 14 July 2017

Video:

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Keith Mitchell: Prescribing Opioids in Cornwall – Turning off the tap

August 4th, 2017 by

SOUTH WEST REDUCING DRUG-RELATED DEATH CONFERENCE 2017

Main Session 3

3. KMitchellHeader

 

 

 

For the presentation, click here:

3. July 2017 DD conference

Video:

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Warren Larkin: Adverse Childhood Experiences

August 4th, 2017 by

SOUTH WEST REDUCING DRUG-RELATED DEATH CONFERENCE 2017

Main Session 2

2. WLarkinHeader

 

 

 

For the presentation, click here:

2. finalDrug Related Deaths ConfWLAL003 REACHh PPT presentation(v1.5)2

Video:

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