Online survey for families of former members of the UK Armed Forces with a substance use problem

July 10th, 2019 by

Thanks to funding from Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT), Adfam is working with the University of York to find out about the experiences and needs of families of former members of the UK Armed Forces with substance use problems, before utilising these findings to develop a new peer support intervention for this group of families.

We recently launched an online survey to hear from families first-hand:
http://bit.ly/family-veterans-survey

This survey is specifically for any family member of a former member of the UK armed forces with a substance use problem. If you are eligible, please do take part and tell us more about your experiences  – and if you work with any families affected in this way please share this information with them and circulate across your networks.

The survey will take up to 45 minutes to complete.

All participants are in with a chance of winning one of two £50 high street vouchers.

Take part in the survey here:
http://bit.ly/family-veterans-survey

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Tombstoning dangers warning

July 9th, 2019 by

 

 

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Sean’s Story

July 9th, 2019 by

A new film from NHS England aims to highlight the dangers of over-prescribing of opioids for chronic pain and shows how a patient, Sean Jennings, from Cornwall changed his life with other treatment.

The film release has been timed to coincide with Sean’s appearance at the House of Lords to speak at a special committee about coping with chronic pain and using alternatives from opioids to cope.

Opioids are often prescribed for patients to deal with long term pain and recent studies have challenged the appropriateness of the levels of prescribing. There is little evidence to show that they are helpful for long term pain, their use will be regulated, and their use monitored more closely now that the harms of prescribing these types of medicines are better understood.

‘Sean’s Story’ is a video that tells the story of Sean Jennings from Cornwall who had a hernia operation 25 years ago and due to an infection, ended up suffering chronic pain. For many years, Sean was taking large doses of opioids which presented numerous side effects and yet he still suffered from continued chronic pain. The film shows how long-term use of high-dose opioid prescribing had a devastating impact on his quality of life and how non-drug therapy has been life changing for Sean

As the pain continued to get worse without relief from opioids, Sean asked his GP to be put on a pain management programme. The pain management programme is specifically designed to help patients develop appropriate long-term coping strategies for living with long term pain.

Sean said: “Every day I was taking more and more painkillers, and I thought I was all right, but I really wasn’t very well. I realised that I wasn’t functioning properly and sought further help from my GP as I just couldn’t cope. He put me on the pain management programme and that changed my life.”

Through alternative therapies such as mindfulness and meditation, Sean has been able to deal with his pain without the reliance on opioids to manage. The film aims to encourage and inspire patients with chronic pain to seek alternatives to prescription opioids to help deal with their condition.

Sean added: “I learnt how to exercise gently and do a little bit of Tai Chi and mindfulness. To start with – mindfulness, I didn’t understand that but, as a sceptic, it works. I’m 18 months now without taking opioids, no gabapentin, nothing for pain whatsoever. The pain hasn’t gone away – it’s simply the way I deal with it now, and I do this through mindfulness.”

The film is also aimed at medical professionals to encourage them to consider incorporating psychological therapies into their patient’s care when they are prescribing opioids for pain. It aims to highlight the over-medication of some patients and to consider referrals to pain management courses which are widely available.

Dr Jim Huddy, who leads on chronic pain at Kernow Clinical Commissioning Group, said: “What we’re hoping for is that Sean’s story can implant what you might call a lightbulb moment for people who are in a similar situation with chronic pain, on high doses of opioids and who haven’t considered that there could be another way to manage their pain and lead their lives.

“For prescribers, I sympathise with the time-constraints and the pressures that we have in consultations. Chronic pain consultations are really challenging, and patient expectations can sometimes be high. They expect a prescription and to start the process of changing that can be really difficult. So, we totally understand why doctors often reach for the prescription pad. Hopefully that will slowly change, but it will be a slow change.”

Sean’s Story will be played in the House of Lords on Tuesday 25 June before an all-party parliamentary group on chronic pain. The group aims to raise awareness of chronic pain and to provide a forum for discussion and debate on issues relating to prevention, treatment and management of chronic pain.

Sean added: “It will be a great honour and privilege to speak at the House of Lords as this is such a personal issue for me and for many others having to live with constant pain. I hope my story will inspire and help others.”

NHS England South West Medical Director, Dr Michael Marsh, said: “This film aims to highlight to prescribers, such as GPs, and to also make patients aware that there are alternatives to opioids to help deal with chronic pain. By integrating psychological therapy with physical health services, the NHS can provide a more efficient support to this group of people with chronic pain and achieve better outcomes.”

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Launceston engagement workshops

July 7th, 2019 by

To gain a local perspective on how effectively partners are tackling key community safety issues on the ground and to discuss areas of concern, Safer Cornwall were invited to host two engagement sessions in Launceston in June – one for young people and one with members of the Launceston Community Network Panel and the wider public.

Community Safety Officer for the area, Lucy Allison, was joined by Safer Cornwall’s Intelligence Manager Erika Sorensen, Community Link Officer Chris Sims and a range of partners including the Police, Anti-Social Behaviour Team, Young People Cornwall, YZUP (young people’s drug and alcohol service), Cornwall Housing, Launceston Youth Project and the Youth Town Council.

The workshops provided an opportunity for partners and local people to talk together about crime and anti-social behaviour and other issues impacting on community safety in Launceston and what Safer Cornwall are already doing through the Partnership Plan. Information gathered in the workshops will be used to improve our understanding of community safety in Cornwall, to identify what more could be done through the Partnership Plan and to understand what additional support might be needed locally.

At the youth workshop young people were asked about their feelings of safety in Launceston.  The majority of young people felt ‘quite safe’ when out in the town during the day, but felt a little less safe after dark because there are less people around and less visibility.  When discussing online safety the young people were very knowledgeable about the risks.

There was an opportunity to talk about crime figures and some of the risks and concerns that might impact on young people, including where to go for more information and help.

We heard that their preferred method of communication is via social media and they were unlikely to read leaflets.  When asked where they would go for help, the majority agreed that they would confide in a trusted adult.  The Safer Cornwall Team and key partners provided useful information on local services that could support the young people in the town.  Overall the young people fed back that events such as this provided them with a voice and they want to be heard!

The second workshop was run with Community Network Panel Members, again to seek their views on community safety issues and how we might tackle them as a partnership.  The workshop was well attended and members fed back valuable local knowledge on the issues that matter to them.

The group discussed local policing, supporting vulnerable people, neighbourhood watch schemes, community cohesion and dealing with adverse social media.  The members identified communication from the Partnership as key to helping people feel informed and connected locally and unlike the young people’s feedback; they preferred a variety of communication methods, including newsletters and parish noticeboards, rather than information being provided only online.

The valuable feedback from both events will now be collated and will help shape the Safer Cornwall Partnership plan for next year.  A big thank you to the young people and community network panel members for their time at the workshop and for an insightful and interesting evening and thanks to The Orchard Centre for hosting the events.

Similar sessions have also been hosted through three of the Safer Towns partnerships – in Penzance, Saltash and Truro.

 

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Faster EFT/Eutaptics

July 7th, 2019 by

The complex needs strategy aims to increase aspirations and maximise the opportunity of positive outcomes for those with multiple needs in Cornwall through:

  • Effectively co-ordinated systems of support around people experiencing complexity
  • People who understand and are willing and able to help
  • A culture of learning and adaptation to better understand needs and what works?

The Lankelly Chase research found a much poorer quality of life for those with complex needs, many having experienced adversity and trauma in childhood.

A growing body of research is revealing the long-term impacts of violence, abuse and neglect experienced during childhood.   Described as Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), they include, among other things, the witnessing or experiencing of violence or abuse, poor mental health of a parent, harmful use of alcohol and other drugs, or a parent in prison.

A modality that supports those who have had traumatic life experiences is Faster EFT/Eutaptics.  This system, developed in America, looks at how our minds successfully create our problems and subsequently how we can work with the mind to change them.  Many client case studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of this intervention for those who have experienced traumatic life events (many of us) and also for those who are manifesting physical and/or mental health problems, addictions, eating disorders, relationship issues etc.

The DAAT supported a visit by the founder of FEFT, Robert Smith, who spent time with complex needs housing and domestic abuse services in Cornwall.  In order to support our culture of learning we wanted to explore whether this modality could be piloted in this area with individuals with complex needs.

During the visit Robert Smith also agreed to deliver an evening seminar on stress management.  Invitations were sent to those on the DAAT training programme delegate list.  Over 60 delegates attended in their own time and provided unanimously positive feedback.  On the night 3 willing volunteers very bravely put themselves forward to address and change a traumatic memory that was negatively impacting their life.

We received the following feedback from one of the volunteers who was ‘tapped on’ during the course of the 2 day visit:

Following this visit and the positive feedback received, a colleague from Cornwall Council Public Health team is currently applying for funding to enable us to test the feasibility of FEFT/Eutaptics on older adults which will include those with complex needs.

Contact                                           

If you require any further please contact:
Name:    Marion Barton
Job title: Social Inclusion Lead

Email:    marion.barton@cornwall.gov.uk

 

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Summer Spend in Cornwall and Join the Tempo Team

July 7th, 2019 by

Spending your summer holiday in Cornwall? Don’t forget to pack your Time Credits because there are loads of great attractions across the county which now accept Time Credits, here are just a few…..

Tate St Ives

Tate St Ives won the Art Fund Museum of the Year 2018, the largest and most prestigious museum prize in the world! Come and see why!

Offer- 2 Time Credits=General Admission

https://timecredits.com/spend/2151

 Minack Theatre

The Minack Theatre is a unique theatre perched on the cliffs high above the Atlantic ocean.  There is a full programme of drama, musicals and opera every summer, together with music, comedy and story-telling. This is open-air theatre at its best, but beware the British weather- come armed with  sunscreen and a raincoat just in case!

Tickets are available for most shows so check out the website and contact the Minack Theatre Box Office on 01736 810181 or email box@minack.com

Offer-2 Time Credits per performance, 1 Time Credit for story telling 1 Time Credit for visit of site (no show).

https://timecredits.com/spend/2022

Cornish Seal Sanctuary

Enjoy a family day out at the Seal Sanctuary. The Sanctuary is set in the picturesque Helford Estuary, by the beautiful village of Gweek in Cornwall. The Seal Sanctuary are a Rescue, Rehabilitation, and Release centre for seals, and most seasons they rescue over 60 pups.

Offer: 3 Time Credits for general admission

https://timecredits.com/spend/2090

Jubilee Pool

The UK’s biggest and most celebrated sea water lido. Built in 1935, a beautiful Art Deco jewel on Penzance’s Promenade and the perfect place for all ages to swim safely in fresh sea water. The pool re-opens to Time Credit Members on 27th July 2019.

Offer- 1 Time Credits for a general swim 1 Time Credit Deck chair hire!

https://timecredits.com/spend/2659

Cornwall has a large a growing network of Spend Partners including 15 Leisure Centres and  9 cinemas for rainy days. Check https://timecredits.com/spend?location=Cornwall&lat=50.2660471&lng=-5.0527125

for all the offers to make the most of your summer holiday in Cornwall.

Sadly our Network Manager, Beth will be leaving Tempo at the end of June. “It’s been an absolute pleasure working with the amazing DAAT and Community Safety Team and I look forward to watching your progress from afar”.

Tempo are recruiting for a new Network Manager to take my place and support the growth of Time Credits in Cornwall. If you’d like to find out more about the role please check out the link below.

http://www.wearetempo.org/join-our-team/networks-manager-cornwall?fbclid=IwAR2K5j63wCB3rBW7M9Rf6-RrD-pXdMuZ7-6nhHkgLnk8RfA_iEG78KUpPwc

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Safe Space for Women and Girls at Boardmasters

July 7th, 2019 by

The Women’s Centre Cornwall is hosting a Safe Space for Women and Girls at Boardmasters 2019, to prevent and respond to sexual assault at the festival.

This will be delivered with the support of Boardmasters, Safer Cornwall, the OPCC and a bank of volunteers from the Domestic Abuse & Sexual Violence, Drug & Alcohol and Children and Young People’s services; providing education, safety information and disclosure facilities for women and girls, primarily, with additional provision for men and boys.

The Safe Space will be situated next to the main welfare tent, offering a chill out, meeting and vanity area for women and girls to come and get ready, with a group of specialist professionals providing awareness and safety information around sexual assault and harassment, as well as encouraging peer on peer support.

In the event of a sexual assault, there will be disclosure cabins and specialised staff to document the disclosure and respond to the needs of the victim, whether that be reporting to the police, attending the SARC or merely offering a safe space to be, to access support.

The multi-agency team will have a significant presence throughout the festival, over a 24hr rota, offering outreach support in collaboration with Addaction workers and Festival Angels. Safer Cornwall, in collaboration with the Women’s Centre Cornwall, will be providing safeguarding refresher training to the festival staff and security, and providing all staff with a sexual assault protocol; facilitating a robust, consistent and simple process for everyone to refer to and follow.

Boardmasters are supporting this initiative and, in conjunction with the Women’s Centre and Safer Cornwall, will be delivering a substantial communications campaign; encouraging all festival goers to support, safeguard and educate their peers and the wider festival community about the prevalence of sexual assault and how to stay safe.

#no excuse                                                                 #don’t be a bystander

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Safer Saltash

July 7th, 2019 by

The Safer Saltash Partnership were out in force on Saturday 22nd June engaging with 100’s of Saltash Residents at the annual Saltash Regatta Festival.  Partners included our Community Safety Officer, Anti-Social Behaviour Caseworker, Community Link Officer, Tri Service Safety Officer, Cornwall Housing team, Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner, Devon and Cornwall Police, Cornwall Fire and Rescue and Saltash.net secondary school.  The team talked to people about crime and disorder in the Town and provided residents with information on key initiatives that are running and how to report community safety issues.

The event was a huge success and the sun was shining all day!

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Weather like this

July 7th, 2019 by

Weather like this is something many people look forward to every year and go out and enjoy. But it’s worth remembering that sunny spells can pose health risks for some people. It’s important to protect yourself from too much sun or heat, to carry water when travelling and to think of those, such as young children or older people, who may feel the heat more acutely than others.

Much of the advice on beating the heat is common sense. But before the hot weather arrives, it is a really good time to think about what you can do to protect yourself and your family and friends from heat.

For some people, such as older people, those with underlying health conditions and those with young children, the summer heat can bring real health risks. That’s why we’re urging everyone to keep an eye on those you know who may be at risk this summer. If you’re able, ask if your friends, family or neighbours need any support.

The top ways for staying safe when the heat arrives are to:

·         look out for others, especially older people, young children and babies and those with underlying health conditions

·         close curtains on rooms that face the sun to keep indoor spaces cooler and remember it may be cooler outdoors than indoors

·         Drink plenty of fluids and avoid excess alcohol never leave anyone in a closed, parked vehicle, especially infants, young children or animals

·         try to keep out of the sun between 11am to 3pm

·         take care and follow local safety advice, if you are going into the water to cool down

·         walk in the shade, apply sunscreen and wear a hat, if you have to go out in the heat

·         avoid physical exertion in the hottest parts of the day

·         wear light, loose fitting cotton clothes

·         make sure you take water with you, if you are travelling

 

The following links may be useful ;

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Newquay Safe issues reminder to parents

July 7th, 2019 by

Newquay Safe is informing parents of young people celebrating the end of their exams that pubs and campsites are not running any under-18s nights in July.

The partnership made up of Cornwall Council, Devon and Cornwall Police and other agencies has been leading on Operation Exodus which is designed to manage the influx of school leavers arriving in Newquay during the first two weeks of July.

This will be the first year that under-18s events are not running and Newquay Safe says it is because fewer young people are having nights out in the town which now has a quieter evening and night-time economy.

Inspector Dave Meredith from Devon and Cornwall Police said: “We recognise that post-GCSE students used to be attracted to the town, so our position has been that we have had to responsibly manage them and ensure their safeguarding is treated as a priority.

“Now however, the partnership and businesses within the town’s night-time economy have recognised this change in customer dynamics and have re-focused their operating practices towards people who are over 18.

“Over the past 10 years Newquay has evolved to be a more family-orientated resort with a reduced emphasis on the night-time economy. This positive evolution has resulted in reduced numbers of young people visiting the town, for example after their GCSE exams.”

Newquay Safe is reminding parents and carers of children planning to visit the town to know where their children are staying and give contact details to accommodation providers in case of emergencies.

The partnership reiterates that underage drinking will not be tolerated.

Rob Nolan, Portfolio Holder for the Environment and Public Protection for Cornwall Council, said: “The partners of Newquay Safe have been working to address concerns to do with young people visiting Newquay following the exam period.

“We encourage accommodation providers to be mindful of their safeguarding responsibilities and support the partnership with raising any concerns.

“Newquay is a family town with outdoor activities, wonderful beaches and green open spaces for all to enjoy.”

Since 2009 the award-winning Newquay Safe Partnership has been helping residents and visitors to the town enjoy the best that Newquay has to offer, by tackling crime, disorder and anti-social behaviour.

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