Harbour Housing in St Austell charity event

October 1st, 2019 by

We have chosen to support the Children’s Cancer and Leukaemia Group (CCLG) as the
grandson of a member of staff is currently going through some serious treatment.

Chester is two years old and has spinal astrocytoma so he regularly has to travel up to Bristol for
treatment.

As an organisation we wanted to do what we could to support the family through this difficult time.
The family has asked that we share the money raised between themselves and CCLG so that the
event will support children and their families all across the country going through the same thing.

The planned event is a Bed Push which is taking place between Friday 29th November and
Sunday 1st December from the Tamar to Land’s End.

We hope to get groups and organisations all the way up and down the county to join us in pushing
the bed, cheering us on, and donating food and drink.

Although the total route is 87 miles, we are asking people along the way to commit to pushing for
just a small segment of that, with each leg stretching roughly 5 miles.

This is a mammoth challenge and we cannot do it alone so we are asking for your help:
Would you be able to commit to pushing for a segment of the route?

We hope that this will be a brilliant community event that will bring together groups, businesses
and organisations across the whole of Cornwall to help children with cancer, and we would love for
your organisation to be a part of it.

What we ask of bed-pushers is that they:
– Can walk 5 miles
– Are free on the weekend of the push
– Enjoy a challenge
– Can get to the designated meeting spot for their segment

We will provide safety wear, support vehicles, collection pots, food & drink, first aid provision and a
lot of support and encouragement.
If you think that this is something that your group would be interested in then please do get
in touch!

If you are unable to make the event there are still loads of ways to get involved, either through
donating, advertising or cheering us on along the route.

More information can be found on our website: http://www.cosgarnehall.org/chesters-bed-push/

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Tombstoning dangers warning

July 9th, 2019 by

 

 

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Faster EFT/Eutaptics

July 7th, 2019 by

The complex needs strategy aims to increase aspirations and maximise the opportunity of positive outcomes for those with multiple needs in Cornwall through:

  • Effectively co-ordinated systems of support around people experiencing complexity
  • People who understand and are willing and able to help
  • A culture of learning and adaptation to better understand needs and what works?

The Lankelly Chase research found a much poorer quality of life for those with complex needs, many having experienced adversity and trauma in childhood.

A growing body of research is revealing the long-term impacts of violence, abuse and neglect experienced during childhood.   Described as Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), they include, among other things, the witnessing or experiencing of violence or abuse, poor mental health of a parent, harmful use of alcohol and other drugs, or a parent in prison.

A modality that supports those who have had traumatic life experiences is Faster EFT/Eutaptics.  This system, developed in America, looks at how our minds successfully create our problems and subsequently how we can work with the mind to change them.  Many client case studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of this intervention for those who have experienced traumatic life events (many of us) and also for those who are manifesting physical and/or mental health problems, addictions, eating disorders, relationship issues etc.

The DAAT supported a visit by the founder of FEFT, Robert Smith, who spent time with complex needs housing and domestic abuse services in Cornwall.  In order to support our culture of learning we wanted to explore whether this modality could be piloted in this area with individuals with complex needs.

During the visit Robert Smith also agreed to deliver an evening seminar on stress management.  Invitations were sent to those on the DAAT training programme delegate list.  Over 60 delegates attended in their own time and provided unanimously positive feedback.  On the night 3 willing volunteers very bravely put themselves forward to address and change a traumatic memory that was negatively impacting their life.

We received the following feedback from one of the volunteers who was ‘tapped on’ during the course of the 2 day visit:

Following this visit and the positive feedback received, a colleague from Cornwall Council Public Health team is currently applying for funding to enable us to test the feasibility of FEFT/Eutaptics on older adults which will include those with complex needs.

Contact                                           

If you require any further please contact:
Name:    Marion Barton
Job title: Social Inclusion Lead

Email:    marion.barton@cornwall.gov.uk

 

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Safety talks around drugs and alcohol

July 7th, 2019 by

Secondary schools in Mid Cornwall have been working with the Youth Intervention Officer Pc Jay Dorman in delivering safety talks around drugs and alcohol.

With year 11 students leaving for the summer, and the summer holidays looming, students have been learning about the dangers of drugs and issues around underage drinking.

Working alongside YZUP, children are being informed about what drugs are currently out there and the risks associated with using them. Students are now aware more than ever of the health implications around drugs use. Also, the law and the consequences of being found in possession of illegal drugs which effects such matters of future employment, travel and further education.

Pc Dorman said “ Most students really understand the issues around illegal drugs when I explain the Line of Criminality, I explain that when a person buys their drugs, they are supporting, County Lines, Modern slavery, Human trafficking, organised crime and potentially, Terrorism.” “Criminal gangs earn money from dealing drugs which can support all the other criminal activities on a larger scale. It’s a question of morals, do you want to support suffering of others to get your kicks?”

We are also encouraging young people to take positive action by calling an ambulance if they believe one of their friends has taken a drug and is having a medical episode. Getting medical help on scene as quickly as possible could save their life!

Further educational work will continue in schools to hopefully keep our children safe for this summer and beyond!

 

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Safer Town Walkabouts

July 7th, 2019 by

Safer Town Walkabouts

Partners from Safer Cornwall and Our Safeguarding Children Partnership are delivering leaflets to retailers in areas across Cornwall in July on the lead up to the school summer holidays as part of the ‘I didn’t know’ campaign about spotting the signs of child exploitation.

We will be providing leaflets, posters and advice about what child exploitation is and how to spot the signs.  We will also outline where people can find advice and support and report any concerns.

Retailers and the service industry are in a unique position to help – evidence shows that public locations can be used as locations to meet, groom and exploit children and young people (both female and male).

Exploited children and young people are almost always too terrified and ashamed to ask for help themselves.  Staff are in a unique position to notice when someone or something seems suspicious, or all may not be right with young customers.  By passing on their concerns to the police, they could potentially save a child from exploitation.  We will provide an update in the next edition of the newsletter.

 

 

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Prince’s Trust Recruitment

June 3rd, 2019 by

 Are you looking for a new challenge?

If you are 16 – 25 and not currently in education, employment or training come along to Truro Community Fire Station on the 19th June to find out more about The Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service Prince’s Trust Team programme and how to join Team 17 starting later this month!

The programme is a 12 week development course with the aim to increase confidence, motivation and skills.

On this action packed programme you’ll take part in a community project, an exciting residential, two weeks work experience in a career of your choice and many more challenges.

You will gain regulated qualifications in Emergency First Aid at Work as well as the Princes Trust Level One Certificate in Employment, Teamwork and Community Skills. You will also have the opportunity to earn Maths and English Level One and Two if needed.

If you are interested in joining the team or would like to refer someone else please complete an online referral form at http://bit.ly/PTTInfo .

To book a place on the taster day please visit http://bit.ly/Team17TasterDay .

*This course does not affect benefits

 

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‘Peer on peer’ child exploitation highlighted as concern in the South West

March 18th, 2019 by

Children across the south west are victims of sexual exploitation.  But while media reports often highlight cases of adult grooming and child abuse, Devon and Cornwall Police say the most likely form of child sexual exploitation (CSE) in the south west is perpetrated by other young people.

It’s sometimes referred to as ‘peer on peer’ exploitation, and its victims are young males and young females.

“People may be unaware that CSE can be perpetrated by young people aged 18 or younger, and they themselves may also have been victims of CSE,” says Detective Chief Inspector Alison Lander, Devon & Cornwall Police and Force lead for CSE.

Recent research led by Plymouth’s Safeguarding Children’s Board found little awareness and understanding among young people of peer on peer sexual exploitation.

Their research showed that this form of exploitation in particular was not widely recognised or understood as a crime, which is preventing children from reporting it.

They found that young people are also not reporting sexual exploitation because they worry that doing so would lose them friendships; they’re concerned about how their parents might react; or that they’ll be seen as wasting police time.

Monday 18 March is a national awareness day for highlighting CSE.  Authorities across the South West are using the day to say to children and young people, “If you are put in a situation where you feel pressured sexually, please report it.  It’s OK to tell someone.”

Lisa, (not her real name).

Lisa is 15 years old and lives with her mother.  She began to go missing, leaving the house during the middle of the night to meet peers, and there were concerns about her drinking alcohol during while out.

Her behaviour in school and at home deteriorated with no clear reason.   Her mum found information on Lisa’s phone, indicating that she had become sexually active,  and having unprotected sex.

Lisa said that she’d exchanged indecent images of herself with some of boys at her school.

On occasions that she went missing, Lisa was drinking alcohol and smoking cannabis with her male friends.  She’d had sex with one of the boys while under the influence, and he’d told his friends about it.

Lisa started getting messages from other boys asking her to send pictures of herself in her underwear.  Lisa felt uncomfortable, but said ‘everyone sends nudes’.  And besides, she felt it was nice to have boys be interested in her in that way.

One boy said that he could get some cannabis, and he offered some to Lisa in exchange for sex.  She’s thought he was joking, but the boy repeated it a few times and on a later occasion with him, she went along with what he asked.

Regional Head of Service for the NSPCC, Sharon Copsey, says:  “Having early conversations about healthy relationships and consent is vital to tackling child sexual exploitation before it starts. We know that young people don’t always understand that what’s happening to them is abuse.”

Detective Chief Inspector Alison Lander, said: “Many young people who are being exploited do not realise they are at risk and will not ask for help.  Some may see themselves as willing participants in such abuse, not realising that what is happening to them is illegal.  It’s a difficult message to convey to young people, but it’s really important that they are aware of risk and how to avoid it.  Crucially they need to know how to report it, and to have confidence to do so.

“The public can really help us detect and prevent CSE among young people by knowing the signs and reporting any concerns they have.

“It’s not just parents, or teachers and carers who can help spot the signs of CSE.  Anyone working in a service industry, such as taxi drivers and hotel workers, shop keepers; anyone who may be able to spot vulnerable young people who may be at risk of exploitation or in an exploitative relationship – can also help to spot the signs and to report any concerns.”

Andy Bickley, Independent Chair of Plymouth Safeguarding Children’s Board, said: “We are committed to working with local organisations to tackle child sexual abuse and exploitation and CSE Day is the ideal opportunity to help improve awareness.

“This latest research shows that it isn’t just adults that exploit children and young people, it can also be their peers, so it’s really important that we make sure our young people know what the dangers are, and also what support is available.”

Schools across the South West and services that work with young people are actively raising awareness of CSE among young people.  Parents and guardians are being encouraged to do the same at home.

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National Child Sexual Exploitation Awareness Day 18th March 2019

March 8th, 2019 by

Safeguarding children and young people to the age of 25 from sexual AND criminal exploitation is a key priority for Safer Cornwall, the Safeguarding Children Partnership, and Safeguarding Adults Board.

Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) is a form of sexual abuse that involves the manipulation and/or coercion of young people into sexual activity – March 18 2019, is National Child Sexual Exploitation Awareness Day which aims to highlight the issues surrounding Child Sexual Exploitation and encourage everyone to think, spot and speak out against abuse – we are also widening the scope to think about criminal exploitation, county lines, trafficking and modern slavery.

We want to raise awareness of child exploitation: knowing the signs, how to report it, and where to get help.

We will be part of a social media campaign in the days leading up to and including the 18th March 2019 – you can sign up to the National Working Group on Twitter https://twitter.com/NatWorGroup or Facebook https://en-gb.facebook.com/TheNWGNetwork/ or visit their website http://www.stop-cse.org/ and look out for our local social media campaign!

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Safety prevention videos

December 7th, 2018 by

Cornwall Fire, Rescue and Community Safety Service have created a series of fire safety prevention videos, which will be launched through the CFRCSS Facebook page to target the biggest causes of accidental dwelling fires to improve knowledge, awareness and change behaviour promoting fire safety advice in the home during the festive season.

Look out for each days festive tips 🎄 HERE

 

 

 

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Partnership Plan consultation

November 8th, 2018 by

Safer Cornwall’s new three year Partnership Plan is now open for consultation and this is your opportunity to tell us what you think about it.

The consultation is open to all. You will find a copy of the Plan on the Safer Cornwall website www.safercornwall.co.uk/surveys with a short on-line survey for sending us your comments. The consultation closes on 13 December 2018.

We are inviting you to read the plan and let us know what you like about it, what you don’t like and if you’d like to see any changes. We will then use all of this feedback to shape the final plan, which will be published in March 2019.

A lot has changed over the last three years and our new Plan must meet the challenges of a changing delivery landscape and risk profile for community safety.

Devon and Cornwall Police, along with other forces across England and Wales, is recording much higher levels of crimes than in previous years and the profile of crime is changing. Domestic abuse and sexual violence, exploitation and cyber-crime are increasingly taking the place of traditional crime prevention and enforcement and these issues are more complex, more resource intensive and require longer term responses to resolve.

This places a strong focus on partners working more effectively together to manage risk and vulnerability, against a backdrop of pressures on budgets and resources across many areas of the public sector. There are opportunities to explore a more efficient, more joined up approach and move more resources into prevention and early intervention.

Drawing on a robust evidence base, the Plan identifies the community safety issues that most impact on the safety, health and wellbeing of Cornwall’s residents and visitors and sets out what we intend to do to tackle these issues effectively and achieve safer, more healthy and more resilient communities.

If you have any queries or require information in a different format please contact us by email mail@safercornwall.co.uk or contact Cornwall Council on 0300 1234 100.

Printed copies of the Plan and the survey will be provided through Information Services and Libraries. We will also be holding some targeted sessions with service user and community groups.

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Safer Cornwall are a working partnership involving: