Draft Domestic Abuse Bill published 21st January 2019

January 28th, 2019 by

The landmark draft Domestic Abuse Bill was published 21st January. It comes as it is revealed domestic abuse issues cost the country £66 billion a year.

To help tackle the crime, it is proposed that new legislation will:

  • introduce the first ever statutory government definition of domestic abuse to specifically include economic abuse and controlling and manipulative non-physical abuse – this will enable everyone, including victims themselves, to understand what constitutes abuse and will encourage more victims to come forward
  • establish a Domestic Abuse Commissioner to drive the response to domestic abuse issues
  • introduce new Domestic Abuse Protection Notices and Domestic Abuse Protection Orders to further protect victims and place restrictions on the actions of offenders
  • prohibit the cross-examination of victims by their abusers in the family courts
  • provide automatic eligibility for special measures to support more victims to give evidence in the criminal courts

The Home Office has published a report into the economic and social cost of domestic abuse, which reveals the crime cost England and Wales £66 billion in 2016 to 2017.

According to the research, the vast majority of this cost (£47 billion) was a result of the physical and emotional harm of domestic abuse, however it also includes other factors such as cost to health services (£2.3 billion), police (£1.3 billion) and victim services (£724 million).

It is estimated that around two million adults experience domestic abuse each year, affecting almost 6% of all adults. Women are twice as likely to be victims than men.

The draft bill will introduce measures:

  • to address coercive control and economic abuse, and how domestic abuse affects children
  • to transform the response in the justice system

The bill will also ban the distressing practice of domestic abuse victims being cross-examined by perpetrators in the family courts.

Between the draft bill and its consultation response, the government is making 120 commitments to tackle domestic abuse. Amongst these are a series of non-legislative measures which include:

  • £8 million of Home Office funding to support children affected by domestic abuse
  • a new crisis support system for those with no recourse to public funds
  • additional funding and capacity building for services for disabled, elderly and LGTB victims
  • updated support, training and guidance on economic abuse
  • new and additional training for job centre work coaches, police, social workers and probation staff to help them recognise and effectively tackle abuse
  • improved support for victims in the family court
  • additional £500,000 funding for provisions for male victims

The government estimates today that domestic abuse cost the economy £66 billion – more than the cost of alcohol and drug misuse, cigarettes and obesity combined. It affects more than 2 million people every year.

Dr Nicola Sharp-Jeffs, Director of Surviving Economic Abuse said:

Economic abuse can prevent victims from leaving an abuser and thwart their efforts to rebuild their lives safely – it can even create new risks.

Through committing to ensure that practitioners have access to training and guidance on economic abuse, the government has recognised that physical and economic safety are entwined.

These new measures will help bring economic abuse out of the shadows and will transform responses, ensuring that victim-survivors are able to access the support they so desperately need.

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Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence training programme

December 7th, 2018 by

Safer Cornwall are delighted to announce that our new Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence training programme will be available from January 2019.

The training is open to staff from any organisation, free of charge and at a variety of venues across Cornwall.

There are 3 levels available:

  • Level 1: Half Day Basic Domestic Abuse awareness & how to respond

To provide staff who work regularly with adults, children and young people and are required to have an understanding of what domestic abuse is and how to respond.

  • Level 2: Full Day Domestic Abuse Awareness Course for Health professionals
  • Level 2: Full Day Domestic Abuse Awareness Course to professionals in Safeguarding roles

To provide staff with knowledge and skills to work directly with victims of domestic abuse, awareness of the sensitivity of issues of domestic abuse and awareness of working with perpetrators of domestic abuse and introduction to DASH (Domestic Abuse, Stalking and Honour Based Violence Risk Identification, Assessment and Management Model)

  • Level 3: Specialist Full day courses to professionals working with victims – Domestic Abuse/DASH training

For professionals who work closely with victims of Domestic Abuse  and/or have a safeguarding role. This training is suitable for those who have a good underpinning knowledge of Domestic Abuse or who have attended our level 2 Domestic Abuse Awareness training. It includes full training in DASH.

DASV Level 3 (DASH Training) dates are available to book now at :

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/barnardos-safer-futures-18214164864

Dates/venues for Level 1 and 2 training will be added to Eventbrite by the end of December 2018.

We strongly recommend booking early to secure your place.

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Coercive control is domestic abuse

November 29th, 2018 by

Controlling or coercive behaviour was criminalised in 2015 – but it still affects hundreds of thousands of women in the UK.

Mumsnet, Women’s Aid and Surrey Police have joined together to help raise awareness of the dangers of coercive control.

A new survey found 38% of Mumsnet users have suffered some form domestic abuse.

If you live in Cornwall or the Isles of Scilly and you think you or someone you know is being controlled by their partner of family member, you can get help now.

  • Call Safer Futures on 0300 777 4 777

or

  • follow this link https://www.firstlight.org.uk/make-a-referral/
  • 24-hour National Domestic Violence Helpline (run by Women’s Aid and Refuge) – 0808 2000 247.
  • If you fear for your immediate safety, or someone else’s, please call 999.

No one needs to live in fear. Get help now!

 

 

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Rural Domestic Abuse Research Survey

November 22nd, 2018 by

We are pleased to support one of the largest surveys looking into Domestic Abuse in the UK and would like to provide this opportunity for any of our clients or former clients to opt in to this National Survey. Your experience when taken alongside that of hundreds of other people who have had similar or contrasting experiences helps to provide an accurate picture of Domestic Abuse across our county as well as contributing to a more national picture.

The survey should take around 5-10 minutes to complete. No personal details will be taken in this survey, so your response will be anonymous. If you feel you can help please click on the link below:

https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/4678535/DVA-Survey

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Reclaim the Night Cornwall – 01 December 2018

November 8th, 2018 by

01 December 2018 17:00 ~ Reclaim the Night Cornwall –

Reclaim the Night Cornwall is on Saturday 1st December, starting at 5pm at Truro Cathedral.

Candlelit vigil to honour women whose lives have been ended by male violence, followed by a march to demand safer streets and an end to violence against women.

16 days of Action from 25th November, International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women to 10th December, Human Rights Day.

17:00 – Assemble at Truro Cathedral
17:15 – Candlelit vigial and choir (All welcome)
18:15 – March (Women only)
19:30 – End

Facebook 

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Partnership Plan consultation

November 8th, 2018 by

Safer Cornwall’s new three year Partnership Plan is now open for consultation and this is your opportunity to tell us what you think about it.

The consultation is open to all. You will find a copy of the Plan on the Safer Cornwall website www.safercornwall.co.uk/surveys with a short on-line survey for sending us your comments. The consultation closes on 13 December 2018.

We are inviting you to read the plan and let us know what you like about it, what you don’t like and if you’d like to see any changes. We will then use all of this feedback to shape the final plan, which will be published in March 2019.

A lot has changed over the last three years and our new Plan must meet the challenges of a changing delivery landscape and risk profile for community safety.

Devon and Cornwall Police, along with other forces across England and Wales, is recording much higher levels of crimes than in previous years and the profile of crime is changing. Domestic abuse and sexual violence, exploitation and cyber-crime are increasingly taking the place of traditional crime prevention and enforcement and these issues are more complex, more resource intensive and require longer term responses to resolve.

This places a strong focus on partners working more effectively together to manage risk and vulnerability, against a backdrop of pressures on budgets and resources across many areas of the public sector. There are opportunities to explore a more efficient, more joined up approach and move more resources into prevention and early intervention.

Drawing on a robust evidence base, the Plan identifies the community safety issues that most impact on the safety, health and wellbeing of Cornwall’s residents and visitors and sets out what we intend to do to tackle these issues effectively and achieve safer, more healthy and more resilient communities.

If you have any queries or require information in a different format please contact us by email mail@safercornwall.co.uk or contact Cornwall Council on 0300 1234 100.

Printed copies of the Plan and the survey will be provided through Information Services and Libraries. We will also be holding some targeted sessions with service user and community groups.

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Drink Spiking

September 25th, 2018 by

How to stay alert, and how to respond:

As reported widely in the local and national media, a drink spiking incident in Falmouth is now being investigated by The Police.

If you become aware of such an incident, please follow this advice given by Devon and Cornwall Police, and take these actions swiftly:

“Report it to the police as soon as you can. They will need to take blood and urine samples. Most drugs leave the body within 72 hours of being taken, but some can be gone in 12 hours so it’s important to be tested as soon as possible.

If you have been sexually assaulted, even if you are too upset to report it to the police immediately, you should try to seek medical assistance if you have been hurt or injured. Any forensic evidence obtained during tests can be stored.”

https://www.devon-cornwall.police.uk/advice/your-community/drugs-and-alcohol/alcohol/drink-spiking/

“If you begin to feel really drunk after only a couple of drinks, get help from a trusted friend or a member of staff from the club or pub management.

Stay away from situations that you do not feel comfortable with.

Remember that alcohol can affect your actions and reactions as well as reduce your ability to be alert – alcohol is the most common date rape drug.

https://www.devon-cornwall.police.uk/advice/your-personal-safety/staying-safe-while-out-for-the-night/

Please be alert, enjoy Cornwall safely, and report anything that concerns you to The Police.

Who to call for help:

Police:

Call 999

If you are in danger, please dial 999 immediately or 101 in a non-emergency.

If you ring 999 but can’t talk, make sure the Police know you are there by coughing or tapping the handset, or by dialling 55.

Cornwall Reach Hub

Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence Helpline:

0300 777 4777  

 

 

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Child Sexual Exploitation Campaign

September 25th, 2018 by

Our Safeguarding Children Partnership and Safer Cornwall is coordinating and supporting an education campaign aimed at the hospitality industry as part of a wider Devon and Cornwall Police campaign called ‘I didn’t know’ from 26th to 28th September 2018.

It follows on from the National Child Sexual Exploitation Day in March 2018 and highlights how the hospitality industry may spot signs and report and gain support.

Child exploitation is a form of abuse that involves the manipulation or coercion of young people into sexual or criminal activity, and there have been many harrowing stories where children have been targeted and groomed.

The ‘I didn’t know’ message aims to highlight child sexual exploitation and encourage everyone to adopt a zero tolerance to the exploitation of children.

Hotels and B&Bs are in a unique position to help – evidence shows that accommodation is often used as a location to meet, groom and abuse children (both girls and boys).

Exploited children are almost always too terrified to ask for help themselves.  Receptionists, managers and housekeepers are in a unique position to notice when someone or something seems suspicious or may not all be ok with young guests.  By passing their concerns on to the police, they could potentially save a child from exploitation/further exploitation.

A leaflet will be provided within walkabouts across 5 of the Safer Towns in Cornwall by local police neighbourhood policing teams and partners, and will be followed up by a larger campaign before peak season next year to provide advice and support to the industry.  Not all accommodation providers will be visited on this occasion but providers and the general public can gain more information by going to:

  1. ‘I didn’t know’ campaign dc.police.uk/CSE

2.  Hotel watch – www.dc.police.uk/hotelwatch

 

 

 

 

#knowthesigns

#saysomething

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100 days, 100 ways

August 23rd, 2018 by

100 days, 100 ways asks people to support First Light by raising £100 between 25 August and 2 December (100 days).  Inspired by 2018 being the 100-year anniversary of women getting the vote in Britain, the campaign concludes with Domestic Abuse Awareness Week (25 November – 2 December) and aims to encourage as many people as possible to think of fun, original ways to fundraise or challenge themselves to achieve a personal goal.

We’re asking donors to sign-up through the following weblink (http://www.100days100ways.org/) where they can request a fundraising pack

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Cornwall Pride

July 28th, 2018 by

Our Pride 2018

This year once again Cornwall Pride will be returning to Newquay. After the pridetastic event last year, how could it not return! On Saturday 25 August why not come and join Cornwall’s celebration of diversity, you are all are welcome to attend along with colleagues, friends and family.

Themes for this year

In line with a Safer Cornwall priority to increase the reporting of hate crime, the service is joining with Devon and Cornwall Police to say “let’s shOUT” about hate crime.

As always we will be promoting recruitment and our apprentices will be there to promote the roles within the service and give their first hand experiences of what it is like to be a firefighter in Cornwall.

Flying the flag

 

This year the Council and the Service will be flying the Pride rainbow flag for the week running up to Pride and the day at New County Hall and Service HQ Tolvaddon.

There will be other rainbow additions to this year’s Pride including rainbow epaulettes. Now supported by the National Fire Chiefs Council, members of the service will be wearing their rainbow epaulettes with Pride on 25 August and the week running up to the day.

Getting involved

If you would like to come along and join the parade please be at the Beach Car Park Newquay no later than 11.30, the flag waving and parade beings at midday.

If you would like to be more involved on the day or have an idea to make our Pride attendance even better then please contact Kathryn Billing Strategic Lead for sex, sexual orientation and gender self-identity.

Kathryn Billing, Area Manager Service Delivery, Service Headquarters

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Safer Cornwall are a working partnership involving: