‘Peer on peer’ child exploitation highlighted as concern in the South West

March 18th, 2019 by

Children across the south west are victims of sexual exploitation.  But while media reports often highlight cases of adult grooming and child abuse, Devon and Cornwall Police say the most likely form of child sexual exploitation (CSE) in the south west is perpetrated by other young people.

It’s sometimes referred to as ‘peer on peer’ exploitation, and its victims are young males and young females.

“People may be unaware that CSE can be perpetrated by young people aged 18 or younger, and they themselves may also have been victims of CSE,” says Detective Chief Inspector Alison Lander, Devon & Cornwall Police and Force lead for CSE.

Recent research led by Plymouth’s Safeguarding Children’s Board found little awareness and understanding among young people of peer on peer sexual exploitation.

Their research showed that this form of exploitation in particular was not widely recognised or understood as a crime, which is preventing children from reporting it.

They found that young people are also not reporting sexual exploitation because they worry that doing so would lose them friendships; they’re concerned about how their parents might react; or that they’ll be seen as wasting police time.

Monday 18 March is a national awareness day for highlighting CSE.  Authorities across the South West are using the day to say to children and young people, “If you are put in a situation where you feel pressured sexually, please report it.  It’s OK to tell someone.”

Lisa, (not her real name).

Lisa is 15 years old and lives with her mother.  She began to go missing, leaving the house during the middle of the night to meet peers, and there were concerns about her drinking alcohol during while out.

Her behaviour in school and at home deteriorated with no clear reason.   Her mum found information on Lisa’s phone, indicating that she had become sexually active,  and having unprotected sex.

Lisa said that she’d exchanged indecent images of herself with some of boys at her school.

On occasions that she went missing, Lisa was drinking alcohol and smoking cannabis with her male friends.  She’d had sex with one of the boys while under the influence, and he’d told his friends about it.

Lisa started getting messages from other boys asking her to send pictures of herself in her underwear.  Lisa felt uncomfortable, but said ‘everyone sends nudes’.  And besides, she felt it was nice to have boys be interested in her in that way.

One boy said that he could get some cannabis, and he offered some to Lisa in exchange for sex.  She’s thought he was joking, but the boy repeated it a few times and on a later occasion with him, she went along with what he asked.

Regional Head of Service for the NSPCC, Sharon Copsey, says:  “Having early conversations about healthy relationships and consent is vital to tackling child sexual exploitation before it starts. We know that young people don’t always understand that what’s happening to them is abuse.”

Detective Chief Inspector Alison Lander, said: “Many young people who are being exploited do not realise they are at risk and will not ask for help.  Some may see themselves as willing participants in such abuse, not realising that what is happening to them is illegal.  It’s a difficult message to convey to young people, but it’s really important that they are aware of risk and how to avoid it.  Crucially they need to know how to report it, and to have confidence to do so.

“The public can really help us detect and prevent CSE among young people by knowing the signs and reporting any concerns they have.

“It’s not just parents, or teachers and carers who can help spot the signs of CSE.  Anyone working in a service industry, such as taxi drivers and hotel workers, shop keepers; anyone who may be able to spot vulnerable young people who may be at risk of exploitation or in an exploitative relationship – can also help to spot the signs and to report any concerns.”

Andy Bickley, Independent Chair of Plymouth Safeguarding Children’s Board, said: “We are committed to working with local organisations to tackle child sexual abuse and exploitation and CSE Day is the ideal opportunity to help improve awareness.

“This latest research shows that it isn’t just adults that exploit children and young people, it can also be their peers, so it’s really important that we make sure our young people know what the dangers are, and also what support is available.”

Schools across the South West and services that work with young people are actively raising awareness of CSE among young people.  Parents and guardians are being encouraged to do the same at home.

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National Child Sexual Exploitation Awareness Day 18th March 2019

March 8th, 2019 by

Safeguarding children and young people to the age of 25 from sexual AND criminal exploitation is a key priority for Safer Cornwall, the Safeguarding Children Partnership, and Safeguarding Adults Board.

Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) is a form of sexual abuse that involves the manipulation and/or coercion of young people into sexual activity – March 18 2019, is National Child Sexual Exploitation Awareness Day which aims to highlight the issues surrounding Child Sexual Exploitation and encourage everyone to think, spot and speak out against abuse – we are also widening the scope to think about criminal exploitation, county lines, trafficking and modern slavery.

We want to raise awareness of child exploitation: knowing the signs, how to report it, and where to get help.

We will be part of a social media campaign in the days leading up to and including the 18th March 2019 – you can sign up to the National Working Group on Twitter https://twitter.com/NatWorGroup or Facebook https://en-gb.facebook.com/TheNWGNetwork/ or visit their website http://www.stop-cse.org/ and look out for our local social media campaign!

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Safer Towns One Year On

March 8th, 2019 by

Our Safer Towns Scheme, developed and coordinated by our Community Safety Team, facilitates and supports a coordinated multi-agency approach to community safety issues, to improve feelings of safety and public reassurance, reduce the risk of harm to the community and protect vulnerable groups. The partnerships work to reduce and prevent crime, disorder and anti-social behaviour. The scheme was launched last April with full governance developed for each of the towns which include; Penzance, Camborne and Redruth, Falmouth, Truro, Newquay, St Austell, Bodmin, Saltash and Liskeard. The team have successfully established the new Safer Towns and broadened the remit of the three Safer Towns which were already in existence.

An enormous amount of work has taken place over the last year to establish partnership arrangements and develop delivery plans based on crime information provided by our Amethyst Team through Town Profiles and feedback from the Cornwall Council Residents Survey.  New Town Profiles have recently been provided to the Safer Towns with delivery plans for 2019/20 being developed currently to account for changes in crime trends and also emerging issues for next year.

The scheme was supported by the Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) with £5,000 allocated to each town. Partners have reviewed priorities and put forward proposals for how the funding should be spent locally. There are a number of new exciting projects, campaigns and outcomes which have been delivered in 2018/19 and will be put in place during 2019/20 through the support of the PCC.

All Safer Towns meet on a regular basis to share current intelligence, raise concerns and deal with emerging dynamic issues collectively. A key factor in the success of the scheme is the wide membership of the groups, which include; public, private and voluntary organisations; who are able to feed in local intelligence and local issues. Each town is unique with different community safety priorities, however there have also been a number of initiatives which have been rolled out through all the Safer Towns.

A shoplifting prevention briefing presented by Devon and Cornwall Police’s Crime Prevention Officer has been organised for all Safer Towns, this provides practical information to local businesses and security teams of how to protect themselves from thefts. It also included information on evidence collection and the process around this. We received positive feedback from the sessions run to date and look to run more sessions in the future.

Blue Light Training has been provided to three pilot towns across the County; Penzance, St Austell and Bodmin. Blue Light supports individuals who are change resistant, problematic drug and alcohol users not engaged with treatment, regularly presenting to emergency services. A multi-agency meeting in each of the towns will provide a mechanism to discuss individuals on a regular basis to collectively provide full support.

A large focus for a number of the towns has been concerns around street drinking and vulnerable individuals; awareness work to ensure the public and communities are aware of local support and who to report concerns to has been extremely important in ensuring the right agencies are informed. Multi-agency walkabouts has been effective in providing reassurance to the public and businesses, targeting specific areas where we have been receiving complaints/concerns raised.

Brief overview of a few of the key initiatives which have been delivered in the towns;

  • Agreement to develop and open a town centre community safety hub accessible to the public in Penzance. The lease has been secured by Cornwall Council Nov 2018. Fire Safety assessment and remedial work in progress.
  • A 12 month pilot has been jointly funded by Penzance Town Council and Cornwall Council for an ASB Caseworker specific to Penzance. This post will be recruited to in March.
  • Agreed siting of two sharps bins in the Camborne both bins will be funded from the PCC Safer Town seed funding.
  • Safer Camborne and Safer Redruth have facilitated a review of local service provision for young people in the area. It has identified the need for a youth café in the Redruth area which will provide a safe space for local young people to go. This is still in the planning process; Safer Towns funding for Redruth will contribute to the opening of Redruth Youth Café, the facility will open in September 2019
  • In Redruth, Police and Community Safety staff are piloting monthly joint surgeries for the public regarding ASB concerns
  • Safer Camborne, Safer Redruth and Safer Penzance have held awareness days in each of the towns in order to promote activity regarding anti-social behaviour and crime to reassure public and raise awareness of partnership working in the area;
  • Shop Watch has been introduced to businesses in Redruth and Camborne, which allows shop staff to communicate with each other with the aim to reduce shoplifting by identifying prolific offenders. This is still in its infancy but training from the police prevention officer will be commencing in early 2019.
  • Safer Falmouth provided information to members of the public at Gyllyngvase Beach following public safety concerns. The events were held to provide awareness of the risk to others from leaving barbeques on the beach, as well as the harmful environmental impact.
  • Following an incident of drink spiking Safer Falmouth ran an awareness campaign to local residents. The partnership provided leaflets to households throughout Falmouth outlining how to keep safe whilst drinking as well as offering safety equipment for bottles. Falmouth University and Exeter University also provided awareness to students on the What Will Your Drink Cost campaign.
  • Truro Safe have conducted two walkabouts throughout the City, providing businesses with key contact information, as well as the opportunity to raise any concerns and find out about the work of the partnership.
  • Following concerns of access for emergency services due to poorly parked vehicles blocking roads within Killigrew Gardens, St Erme, Truro Safe; led by Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service, implemented the Think Before You Park initiative. Partners visited households throughout the area and left leaflets highlighting the responsibility drivers have to ensure that roads are accessible and the implications, if this is not considered, on emergency service response.
  • Truro Safe continues to have donation boxes available throughout the City which supports those within the City who are homeless. The partnership was pleased to provide sleeping bags and fund two outreach worker packs using the latest donations from members of the public.
  • Safer St Austell visited residents of St Blazey in August to discuss local issues following concerns that had been made and provide information on support available. Residents reiterated their concerns; which included noise nuisance. The walkabout was successful with approximately 27 households engaged. The partnership also spoke to young people in the community to understand what concerns they have and how these may be addressed. The partnership will be looking into the feedback that was provided and potential changes that could be made, which could positively impact on the issues faced by the community.
  • Further work needed to take place regarding public perception of crime within St Austell; Safer St Austell has updated the Communications Plan to take account of this priority. The objectives continue to be to promote successes and the work of the partnership, target engagement to best address concerns of safety and ensure negative concerns are addressed swiftly and effectively. The group have increased articles for local publications and the website along with social media posts. They have also updated the Community Action Days calendar for 2018/19 to promote the work of the partnership and support services including a very successful Sleep Out Event which raised awareness of homelessness. A new scheme was also introduced following this event to support the local homeless charity and promote signposting.
  • Safer Bodmin has received a full briefing on current county lines activity in the Town from the Police Intelligence Directorate. The group has prioritised raising public awareness of this complex crime and will focus on vulnerability and building resilience.
  • Mapping the services available in Bodmin against the nine reducing reoffending pathways is underway. Once any gaps have been identified it is Safer Bodmin’s ambition to influence and potentially fund services to meet the local needs.
  • Safer Bodmin have supported the Berryfields Community Centre and agreed to contribute towards the funding of this vital youth provision in the town. Planning is also underway on a youth focused event with the Bodmin Watch; this event will be based on the Junior Life Skills events and will incorporate an art work competition with the pupils from Bodmin College.  Additionally, during March 2019 Safer Bodmin will run a survey with pupils from Bodmin College to seek their views on community safety in the town and what activities they engage with and would want to see in Bodmin.  The results of this survey will inform future plans for 2019.20.
  • In Saltash there have been a number of sessions delivered to pupils and parents of Saltash.net School to raise awareness about drug misuse. These have included sessions on the impact of drug use from the police as well as harm reduction / mental health education delivered from YZUP (young persons’ substance misuse service). Safer Saltash have been working closely with Saltash.net secondary school and have recently supported their BeWell whole school drop down day focused on mental wellbeing.
  • Safer Saltash have met with the Tamar Bridge Committee to discuss the issue of people completing suicide off the Tamar Bridge. Further work in partnership with the Committee will now take place with a focus on suicide prevention. Additionally, a recent presentation at a Safer Saltash meeting from the Public Health Healthy Promotions team resulted in a decision by the group to offer a ‘Suicide Talk’ (3 hours) to a multi-disciplined group in Saltash focusing on businesses and community groups (up to 90 delegates).  Following on from this, a core group will be identified and trained in ASIST (2 days) and become Suicide First Aiders.
  • Safer Saltash identified ASB as a priority area; the group have focused on this and supported the Core’s successful OPCC bid for ‘The Friday Night Project’ and provided funding for the Saltmill initiative for young people.  Saltash has a current seasonal issue with tombstoning and work is underway to revise a leaflet containing safety advice on tombstoning and letters have been sent from Safer Saltash to Network Rail regarding concerns over access to the Network Rail owned pillar where young people are tombstoning from.  The group have also agreed to part fund a body worn camera for the local ASB caseworker.  The group are also exploring the opportunity for the Town and Waterfront Wardens to be granted Community Safety Accreditation Scheme (CSAS) powers.
  • Safer Liskeard has made an evidence based decision to purchase a needle disposal unit to be located outside the Town Council owned Sungirt Toilets. A local arrangement has been reached with regards to the safe emptying and disposal of the clinical waste and signage and comms are currently being developed to support this initiative.
  • Safer Liskeard supported National Domestic Abuse week and held a successful public engagement event at Liskeard Community Hospital on 30th November 18. The Healthy Relationships Programme has been delivered in Liskeard Secondary School and the group will be utilising some of the OPCC funding to purchase mobile phones and personal attack alarms for Domestic Abuse victims in the town.  These crime prevention/safety resources will be managed by the IDVA locally.
  • The Safer Liskeard team have identified Castle Park as an area for environmental improvement activity and have conducted a site visit to the area. This activity aims to promote residents taking pride in their town whilst improving feelings of safety and will complement the soon to be reformed ‘Friends of Castle Park’ group.  The work will include targeted multi-agency outreach; consultation with residents; fundraising for play equipment; organised activities in the park; a link to the Time Credits project and CRC unpaid work involvement in remedial work in the park.

What’s coming up?

  • Blue Light Scheme to be implemented across all towns;
  • Specialist Youth Programme led by our Phoenix Team developed to support young people involved with crime and potentially deter them through engagement;
  • Community Action Days to be completed for 2019 including a youth engagement event in Bodmin, joint Engagement events with the OPCC in all Safer Towns and walkabouts within most of the Safer Towns;
  • Initial scoping work is now taking place for a diversity festival in Bodmin to celebrate multi-cultural food and music. The purpose of this work is to build community resilience, break down barriers and promote cohesion.
  • Safer Liskeard will have a community safety stand at Liskeard Community Fair on Saturday 30th March; and Safer Saltash will be at the Saltash Regatta. These events will involve all partners and the OPCC road show van and will be a fantastic opportunity to engage with residents and to understand their needs in relation to crime, disorder and community safety.
  • Truro Safe signage to be fitted at various locations across Truro, providing information on support services;
  • Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence campaign for Truro to be piloted;
  • A number of campaigns to be developed in Newquay including; drug litter, thefts, water safety concerns;
  • Review of noise nuisance complaints 2018 and contact procedure for complaints for Falmouth;
  • working with Heartlands (Pool) business manager, residents and partner agencies to set up a Residents Community Safety Group;
  • young people’s services networking event to be held in Camborne
  • a focus on business engagement and training in Penzance
  • Mobile CCTV camera usage being investigated in Penzance and Redruth.
  • a focused countywide campaign to encourage reporting of crime and ASB to the appropriate numbers

We want to thank all the partners who have been involved with the schemes and continue to support the work of the partnership. If you would like to find out more about a particularly Safer Town please visit https://safercornwall.co.uk/safer-towns/ or email communitysafety@cornwall.gov.uk.  Please follow East Cornwall Community Safety Officer on Twitter here  https://twitter.com/LucyAllison_CSO

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Draft Domestic Abuse Bill published 21st January 2019

January 28th, 2019 by

The landmark draft Domestic Abuse Bill was published 21st January. It comes as it is revealed domestic abuse issues cost the country £66 billion a year.

To help tackle the crime, it is proposed that new legislation will:

  • introduce the first ever statutory government definition of domestic abuse to specifically include economic abuse and controlling and manipulative non-physical abuse – this will enable everyone, including victims themselves, to understand what constitutes abuse and will encourage more victims to come forward
  • establish a Domestic Abuse Commissioner to drive the response to domestic abuse issues
  • introduce new Domestic Abuse Protection Notices and Domestic Abuse Protection Orders to further protect victims and place restrictions on the actions of offenders
  • prohibit the cross-examination of victims by their abusers in the family courts
  • provide automatic eligibility for special measures to support more victims to give evidence in the criminal courts

The Home Office has published a report into the economic and social cost of domestic abuse, which reveals the crime cost England and Wales £66 billion in 2016 to 2017.

According to the research, the vast majority of this cost (£47 billion) was a result of the physical and emotional harm of domestic abuse, however it also includes other factors such as cost to health services (£2.3 billion), police (£1.3 billion) and victim services (£724 million).

It is estimated that around two million adults experience domestic abuse each year, affecting almost 6% of all adults. Women are twice as likely to be victims than men.

The draft bill will introduce measures:

  • to address coercive control and economic abuse, and how domestic abuse affects children
  • to transform the response in the justice system

The bill will also ban the distressing practice of domestic abuse victims being cross-examined by perpetrators in the family courts.

Between the draft bill and its consultation response, the government is making 120 commitments to tackle domestic abuse. Amongst these are a series of non-legislative measures which include:

  • £8 million of Home Office funding to support children affected by domestic abuse
  • a new crisis support system for those with no recourse to public funds
  • additional funding and capacity building for services for disabled, elderly and LGTB victims
  • updated support, training and guidance on economic abuse
  • new and additional training for job centre work coaches, police, social workers and probation staff to help them recognise and effectively tackle abuse
  • improved support for victims in the family court
  • additional £500,000 funding for provisions for male victims

The government estimates today that domestic abuse cost the economy £66 billion – more than the cost of alcohol and drug misuse, cigarettes and obesity combined. It affects more than 2 million people every year.

Dr Nicola Sharp-Jeffs, Director of Surviving Economic Abuse said:

Economic abuse can prevent victims from leaving an abuser and thwart their efforts to rebuild their lives safely – it can even create new risks.

Through committing to ensure that practitioners have access to training and guidance on economic abuse, the government has recognised that physical and economic safety are entwined.

These new measures will help bring economic abuse out of the shadows and will transform responses, ensuring that victim-survivors are able to access the support they so desperately need.

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Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence training programme

December 7th, 2018 by

Safer Cornwall are delighted to announce that our new Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence training programme will be available from January 2019.

The training is open to staff from any organisation, free of charge and at a variety of venues across Cornwall.

There are 3 levels available:

  • Level 1: Half Day Basic Domestic Abuse awareness & how to respond

To provide staff who work regularly with adults, children and young people and are required to have an understanding of what domestic abuse is and how to respond.

  • Level 2: Full Day Domestic Abuse Awareness Course for Health professionals
  • Level 2: Full Day Domestic Abuse Awareness Course to professionals in Safeguarding roles

To provide staff with knowledge and skills to work directly with victims of domestic abuse, awareness of the sensitivity of issues of domestic abuse and awareness of working with perpetrators of domestic abuse and introduction to DASH (Domestic Abuse, Stalking and Honour Based Violence Risk Identification, Assessment and Management Model)

  • Level 3: Specialist Full day courses to professionals working with victims – Domestic Abuse/DASH training

For professionals who work closely with victims of Domestic Abuse  and/or have a safeguarding role. This training is suitable for those who have a good underpinning knowledge of Domestic Abuse or who have attended our level 2 Domestic Abuse Awareness training. It includes full training in DASH.

DASV Level 3 (DASH Training) dates are available to book now at :

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/barnardos-safer-futures-18214164864

Dates/venues for Level 1 and 2 training will be added to Eventbrite by the end of December 2018.

We strongly recommend booking early to secure your place.

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Coercive control is domestic abuse

November 29th, 2018 by

Controlling or coercive behaviour was criminalised in 2015 – but it still affects hundreds of thousands of women in the UK.

Mumsnet, Women’s Aid and Surrey Police have joined together to help raise awareness of the dangers of coercive control.

A new survey found 38% of Mumsnet users have suffered some form domestic abuse.

If you live in Cornwall or the Isles of Scilly and you think you or someone you know is being controlled by their partner of family member, you can get help now.

  • Call Safer Futures on 0300 777 4 777

or

  • follow this link https://www.firstlight.org.uk/make-a-referral/
  • 24-hour National Domestic Violence Helpline (run by Women’s Aid and Refuge) – 0808 2000 247.
  • If you fear for your immediate safety, or someone else’s, please call 999.

No one needs to live in fear. Get help now!

 

 

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Rural Domestic Abuse Research Survey

November 22nd, 2018 by

We are pleased to support one of the largest surveys looking into Domestic Abuse in the UK and would like to provide this opportunity for any of our clients or former clients to opt in to this National Survey. Your experience when taken alongside that of hundreds of other people who have had similar or contrasting experiences helps to provide an accurate picture of Domestic Abuse across our county as well as contributing to a more national picture.

The survey should take around 5-10 minutes to complete. No personal details will be taken in this survey, so your response will be anonymous. If you feel you can help please click on the link below:

https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/4678535/DVA-Survey

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Reclaim the Night Cornwall – 01 December 2018

November 8th, 2018 by

01 December 2018 17:00 ~ Reclaim the Night Cornwall –

Reclaim the Night Cornwall is on Saturday 1st December, starting at 5pm at Truro Cathedral.

Candlelit vigil to honour women whose lives have been ended by male violence, followed by a march to demand safer streets and an end to violence against women.

16 days of Action from 25th November, International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women to 10th December, Human Rights Day.

17:00 – Assemble at Truro Cathedral
17:15 – Candlelit vigial and choir (All welcome)
18:15 – March (Women only)
19:30 – End

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Partnership Plan consultation

November 8th, 2018 by

Safer Cornwall’s new three year Partnership Plan is now open for consultation and this is your opportunity to tell us what you think about it.

The consultation is open to all. You will find a copy of the Plan on the Safer Cornwall website www.safercornwall.co.uk/surveys with a short on-line survey for sending us your comments. The consultation closes on 13 December 2018.

We are inviting you to read the plan and let us know what you like about it, what you don’t like and if you’d like to see any changes. We will then use all of this feedback to shape the final plan, which will be published in March 2019.

A lot has changed over the last three years and our new Plan must meet the challenges of a changing delivery landscape and risk profile for community safety.

Devon and Cornwall Police, along with other forces across England and Wales, is recording much higher levels of crimes than in previous years and the profile of crime is changing. Domestic abuse and sexual violence, exploitation and cyber-crime are increasingly taking the place of traditional crime prevention and enforcement and these issues are more complex, more resource intensive and require longer term responses to resolve.

This places a strong focus on partners working more effectively together to manage risk and vulnerability, against a backdrop of pressures on budgets and resources across many areas of the public sector. There are opportunities to explore a more efficient, more joined up approach and move more resources into prevention and early intervention.

Drawing on a robust evidence base, the Plan identifies the community safety issues that most impact on the safety, health and wellbeing of Cornwall’s residents and visitors and sets out what we intend to do to tackle these issues effectively and achieve safer, more healthy and more resilient communities.

If you have any queries or require information in a different format please contact us by email mail@safercornwall.co.uk or contact Cornwall Council on 0300 1234 100.

Printed copies of the Plan and the survey will be provided through Information Services and Libraries. We will also be holding some targeted sessions with service user and community groups.

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Drink Spiking

September 25th, 2018 by

How to stay alert, and how to respond:

As reported widely in the local and national media, a drink spiking incident in Falmouth is now being investigated by The Police.

If you become aware of such an incident, please follow this advice given by Devon and Cornwall Police, and take these actions swiftly:

“Report it to the police as soon as you can. They will need to take blood and urine samples. Most drugs leave the body within 72 hours of being taken, but some can be gone in 12 hours so it’s important to be tested as soon as possible.

If you have been sexually assaulted, even if you are too upset to report it to the police immediately, you should try to seek medical assistance if you have been hurt or injured. Any forensic evidence obtained during tests can be stored.”

https://www.devon-cornwall.police.uk/advice/your-community/drugs-and-alcohol/alcohol/drink-spiking/

“If you begin to feel really drunk after only a couple of drinks, get help from a trusted friend or a member of staff from the club or pub management.

Stay away from situations that you do not feel comfortable with.

Remember that alcohol can affect your actions and reactions as well as reduce your ability to be alert – alcohol is the most common date rape drug.

https://www.devon-cornwall.police.uk/advice/your-personal-safety/staying-safe-while-out-for-the-night/

Please be alert, enjoy Cornwall safely, and report anything that concerns you to The Police.

Who to call for help:

Police:

Call 999

If you are in danger, please dial 999 immediately or 101 in a non-emergency.

If you ring 999 but can’t talk, make sure the Police know you are there by coughing or tapping the handset, or by dialling 55.

Cornwall Reach Hub

Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence Helpline:

0300 777 4777  

 

 

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Safer Cornwall are a working partnership involving: