Cornwall Diversity Food Festival

November 9th, 2018 by

It’s time to celebrate food! Come along to the Cornwall Diversity Food Festival at New County Hall on 17th November.

From 11am the event will be open for people of all ages to enjoy and celebrate cultures and food from around the world. Find out more about this event from the poster attached.

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Reclaim the Night Cornwall – 01 December 2018

November 8th, 2018 by

01 December 2018 17:00 ~ Reclaim the Night Cornwall –

Reclaim the Night Cornwall is on Saturday 1st December, starting at 5pm at Truro Cathedral.

Candlelit vigil to honour women whose lives have been ended by male violence, followed by a march to demand safer streets and an end to violence against women.

16 days of Action from 25th November, International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women to 10th December, Human Rights Day.

17:00 – Assemble at Truro Cathedral
17:15 – Candlelit vigial and choir (All welcome)
18:15 – March (Women only)
19:30 – End

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Chimney fire

October 3rd, 2018 by

Chimney Fire

A crew of six firefighters from Lostwithiel Community Fire Station were mobilised to a chimney fire on the evening of Monday 2 October within the town. After investigating they found the remains of a birds nest halfway up the chimney breast. Please can we ask you to endure your chimney is cleaned after the summer months ahead of the winter.

Thankfully this incident was contained but so often these types of incidents can escalate.

The following link contains safety advice: https://bit.ly/2fDP8rc

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Cornwall Faith Response Team Re-launch

October 3rd, 2018 by

Cornwall Council has had a Faith Response Team (CFRT) for several years but has now been re-launched, equipped, trained & prepared to respond effectively as required anywhere in Cornwall. People involved with or affected by an emergency may require pastoral, spiritual & practical support, especially where they are suffering through pain, sorrow, trauma, severe injury, loss of property or possessions or where people are missing.

Our Resilience & Emergency Management team recognises that such support can be provided by suitably trained volunteers, and now the team has been re-launched, equipped, trained and prepared to respond effectively as required anywhere in Cornwall.

The team will be mobilised if the Resilience & Emergency Management team become aware of an incident where such support is or may be required. The Royal Cornwall Hospitals Trust Spiritual & Pastoral Care Team will contact the necessary CFRT members & request their attendance at the incident location as required.

The training being provided to team members includes information about what to expect at such incident scenes, recognition of personal confidence, capabilities and limitations, understanding the various types of incident scenes, shelters and reception centres where they may need to interact with affected people and how they may support them.

Members of the CFRT are drawn from a wide range of faiths & beliefs including Christian, Judaism, Pagan and others. It is important to recognise the ecumenical strength of the team but they will provide support to anyone needing it.

Cornwall Council’s Senior Resilience Officer, Martin Rawling said: “I am humbled by the willingness of our volunteers to step into the unknown and support their fellow beings in such circumstances of terror, loss and suffering. We are grateful to our volunteers for committing to this task and I sincerely hope that we never have to call on their support; but I am absolutely confident that they will respond appropriately when asked.
“Bringing the team together, working on the procedures for the group and co-ordinating the team and their training has fallen to a handful of the volunteers themselves who have stepped forward to become the management group. The residents and visitors to Cornwall are right to be proud of this commitment and the work they have undertaken on our behalf.”

The re-launch took place on 17 September

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National Burn Awareness Day

September 27th, 2018 by

National Burn Awareness Day 2018

17 October.

A burn injury is for life. The scars are physical as well as psychological, and can present life-long challenges for the individual and their families.  What many people don’t know is that children and the elderly are the most vulnerable, and the majority of injuries occur as a result of an accident that could so easily have been prevented.

In 2017, 7,502 children were burned or scalded. Hot drinks are the most common cause of scald injury in children – followed by contact with electric cookers, irons and hair straighteners.

First Aid

Treat burns with cold running water for 20 minutesGood first aid following a burn or scald can make an enormous difference in recovery times and the severity of scarring.

Two important things to remember are:

Cool, Call, Cover

  1. Cool the burn with running cold tap water for 20 minutes and remove all clothing and jewellery (unless it is melted or firmly stuck to the wound)
  2. Call for help – 999, 111 or local GP for advice
  3. Cover with cling film or a sterile, non-fluffy dressing or cloth. Make sure the patient is kept warm

Stop, Drop, roll

“Stop, drop and roll” is used when clothing catches fire. Children can get confused about when to stop, drop and roll. It is important to know when to do this. Children who do not have a good understanding of stop, drop and roll will sometimes do this if they burn a finger or need to get outside if the smoke alarm sounds. Only use stop, drop and roll when clothing catches fire.

Find out more how to prevent burns HERE

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Drink Spiking

September 25th, 2018 by

How to stay alert, and how to respond:

As reported widely in the local and national media, a drink spiking incident in Falmouth is now being investigated by The Police.

If you become aware of such an incident, please follow this advice given by Devon and Cornwall Police, and take these actions swiftly:

“Report it to the police as soon as you can. They will need to take blood and urine samples. Most drugs leave the body within 72 hours of being taken, but some can be gone in 12 hours so it’s important to be tested as soon as possible.

If you have been sexually assaulted, even if you are too upset to report it to the police immediately, you should try to seek medical assistance if you have been hurt or injured. Any forensic evidence obtained during tests can be stored.”

https://www.devon-cornwall.police.uk/advice/your-community/drugs-and-alcohol/alcohol/drink-spiking/

“If you begin to feel really drunk after only a couple of drinks, get help from a trusted friend or a member of staff from the club or pub management.

Stay away from situations that you do not feel comfortable with.

Remember that alcohol can affect your actions and reactions as well as reduce your ability to be alert – alcohol is the most common date rape drug.

https://www.devon-cornwall.police.uk/advice/your-personal-safety/staying-safe-while-out-for-the-night/

Please be alert, enjoy Cornwall safely, and report anything that concerns you to The Police.

Who to call for help:

Police:

Call 999

If you are in danger, please dial 999 immediately or 101 in a non-emergency.

If you ring 999 but can’t talk, make sure the Police know you are there by coughing or tapping the handset, or by dialling 55.

Cornwall Reach Hub

Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence Helpline:

0300 777 4777  

 

 

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Mental health service maps

September 21st, 2018 by

“Research by Safer Cornwall in 2016 showed a need for a clear guide about referring individuals to mental health services.  These maps were developed in order to assist Safer Cornwall services when making referrals or signposting individuals to mental health services in Cornwall.

These maps show:

  • Primary and secondary mental healthcare services including which conditions they treat and how to contact them
  • Details of other community mental health services including services for veterans
  • Details of specialist community safety services for drug and alcohol misuse and domestic abuse and sexual violence
  • A mini guide of what a good quality referral to mental health services should include.

The maps have been tested by service representatives and are now available to be shared within and across services in Cornwall.  These maps will be updated periodically as service delivery changes but please contact us if you notice any content which needs changing.”

To view the Service Maps click below

Library – Strategies and Evidence
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100 days, 100 ways

August 23rd, 2018 by

100 days, 100 ways asks people to support First Light by raising £100 between 25 August and 2 December (100 days).  Inspired by 2018 being the 100-year anniversary of women getting the vote in Britain, the campaign concludes with Domestic Abuse Awareness Week (25 November – 2 December) and aims to encourage as many people as possible to think of fun, original ways to fundraise or challenge themselves to achieve a personal goal.

We’re asking donors to sign-up through the following weblink (http://www.100days100ways.org/) where they can request a fundraising pack

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Police warning over substance abuse – Two girls hospitalised

August 1st, 2018 by

Police warning over substance abuse

Detectives in Bodmin are currently investigating an incident which left two teenagers needing medical assistance following suspected substance abuse in Bodmin.

Officers were notified at about 11:00pm Sunday 29 July to reports of two teenage girls who had taken an unknown substance and became very unwell as a result.

The girls, a 16-year-old and a 17-year-old, were both taken to Treliske Hospital where their condition was stabilised. The 16-year-old girl was later released from hospital, the 17-year-old girl is currently recovering in hospital.

DC Andy Petherick said: “The substance that these girls are believed to have taken came in the form of yellow tablets which were in the shape of a shield with ‘EA7’ written on them, similar to the one pictured.

“We are urging young people to stay away from substances. You do not know what is in them or how strong the drug may be or how your body will react to them.”

Anybody with information about this incident are asked to contact police via 101@dc.police.uk or by calling 101 and quote log number 989 29/07/2018

 

 

 

https://www.devon-cornwall.police.uk/News/NewsArticle.aspx?id=e5f87eac-1c6f-49ca-ba0f-f71f9de860f8

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Alprazolam (Xanax) – What are the Facts?

July 30th, 2018 by

Public Health England briefing

Over the past year, there has been increasing media coverage about alprazolam (typically referred to by the brand name Xanax), highlighting what is being seen as a rise in the number of young people using it. Most of the media reports have described individual cases or reports from treatment services, and there has been little discussion of the research evidence or the actual data.

As with all media coverage which highlights potential changes in drug trends, there is a risk that the evidence isn’t clearly presented or even available, and that raising the profile of a particular drug can inadvertently increase interest from some drug users.

What is alprazolam?

Alprazolam is a medicine in the benzodiazepine family of drugs. Benzodiazepines are most commonly prescribed for the treatment of anxiety and insomnia, and they are also prescribed to control seizures caused by epilepsy.

The most frequently prescribed benzodiazepine in the UK is diazepam, known by the tradename Valium. In comparison, alprazolam is a faster acting drug and is about 10 times stronger, meaning that it can rapidly cause feelings of sedation.

Like other benzodiazepines, alprazolam can cause problems when taken without medical supervision. In the short term, its misuse can cause over-sedation, collapsing and overdose. Longer-term use can lead to physical dependence and severe withdrawal upon reducing or stopping use.

Furthermore, taking any benzodiazepine with alcohol and/or other drugs increases the risk of harm. This is particularly the case when benzodiazepines are mixed with other sedative drugs.

Alprazolam is not available from the NHS, but can be obtained on a private prescription in the UK. Illicit alprazolam, normally in the form of counterfeit Xanax tablets, can be bought from street level drug markets and is also available to purchase from illegal websites and social media apps.

What is being said about alprazolam (Xanax)?

There have been a growing number of personal stories reported in the media, often about young people who have developed problems with alprazolam (Xanax), as well as anecdotal reports that they are self-medicating for anxiety issues.

There have also been discussions around alprazolam in political circles. In January this year, the MP Bambos Charalambous led the first debate in the House of Commons to discuss its misuse.

Sometimes, the use of alprazolam (Xanax) is portrayed in the media as a major epidemic among young people. There is currently no evidence of this, but, as we explain further down, there is some evidence that prevalence is increasing. It is important to understand that patterns of drug use change over time. Some drugs rapidly emerge but then their use quickly declines, other drugs persist and cause significant and sustained harm. It is currently too early to know which category alprazolam will fall into.

What do we know about alprazolam use?

As the media coverage of alprazolam continues, PHE has been asked to comment, particularly on trends. There is some evidence to suggest that use is a growing problem, particularly among young people and young adults. However, the data we have does not give a clear picture of the prevalence of alprazolam use, as some of these data cover all benzodiazepines and not alprazolam specifically, making it more difficult to detect changes in use.

Preliminary hospital admission data in England for 2017 indicates that there has been an increase in the number of people aged under 20 admitted to hospital with benzodiazepine poisoning. Over the same period, enquiries to the National Poisons Information Service about the treatment of alprazolam poisoning have increased substantially. PHE has examined UK police seizures data for drugs that were submitted for forensic analysis, which showed that the number of alprazolam seizures was far greater in 2017 than in previous years, increasing from fewer than ten seizures in 2016 to over 800 in 2017.

Many of the Xanax tablets available on illicit markets are not of pharmaceutical grade, but are in fact counterfeit. This is a major concern because these counterfeit products may contain very variable amounts of alprazolam, making it hard for drug users to decide how much to take. Counterfeit Xanax has also been shown to sometimes contain other drugs and/or potentially dangerous adulterants.

Information we have received from TICTAC, a drug analysis laboratory, has confirmed that samples produced to look like real Xanax tablets actually contained other drugs such as etizolam, which is another benzodiazepine linked to a large number of deaths in Scotland. TICTAC also found that ‘fake’ tablets that did contain alprazolam varied greatly in strength, with some tablets having more than 10 times the normal dose of an authentic Xanax tablet.

The unpredictability of dose can be very dangerous to drug users who will not be able to judge how much alprazolam (or other substituted drugs) the tablets contains until after they have consumed it and are experiencing harmful effects.

What is being done and what should be done?

What PHE is doing

At PHE, we’ve been looking at all national data and other intelligence to try to get a better understanding of alprazolam use in England. We are also talking to experts and others to build a clearer picture.

Our locally based PHE Centre teams are working closely with local authorities, providing them with data, guidance and other bespoke support to help them assess local treatment need, and commission services to meet that need. This may include specific support for those misusing alprazolam depending on the size of the problem in their area.

We are piloting Report Illicit Drug Reactions (RIDR), an online reporting system for harm caused by illicit drugs, particularly new psychoactive substances (NPS). This system also captures the harms caused by misused medications, such as alprazolam.

When new drugs or patterns of use emerge, the particular health consequences associated with them may not always be fully understood at first. For example, the bladder problems caused by ketamine were not originally recognised until different treatment services began to join the dots and find the link between the two. RIDR seeks to speed up the identification of harms, so that health and treatment services can rapidly deliver the most appropriate interventions. PHE encourages frontline staff to use RIDR to report clinical harms they are seeing in their local areas. This helps build a better understanding of the emerging problems and their geographical distribution.

PHE holds a quarterly clinical network meeting with experts on new drugs and emerging drug trends, which provides the opportunity to discuss data from RIDR, the latest NPS-related research, and other sources. After each meeting, we update the RIDR dashboard to log current issues and concerns. Alprazolam has featured on the dashboard since September 2017.

What are we doing in Cornwall & Isles of Scilly?

Our treatment services have responded to this emerging pattern of use by learning more, training their staff, producing information for young people, raising awareness of the problem locally, and offering advice, support and treatment to young people having problems.

Drug Watch, an information network, put together a briefing on alprazolam for professionals and the public (see below) which we are disseminating.

We seek to ensure that staff working in services in contact with vulnerable groups are well-informed; and support the development of appropriate responses.

It is especially important that any local communications to professionals and young people are proportionate so that they raise awareness and knowledge without driving up interest and drug-seeking.

Download PDF FileAlprazolam Infosheet DrugWatch

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Safer Cornwall are a working partnership involving: