Opportunities for Upstream Prevention: Nos Da Kernow

October 31st, 2019 by

The key objective of the service is to improve early identification and support for those who are at risk of homelessness in Cornwall.

People at risk of homelessness, including but not limited to people who are ‘sofa surfing’ and people about to be discharged from hospital. The service will support people to maintain their existing accommodation or to identify alternative accommodation as appropriate, working with clients to identify and manage risks to their safety.

It is only for those who do not fall under any statutory duty (ie, not within 56 days of homelessness).

Nos Da Kernow will provide a service in a manner that is flexible, person-centred and responsive to the individual needs and agreed outcomes with the Client. The Client will be supported to identify their strengths and to develop the skills and knowledge needed to achieve their housing related goals. Clients will be supported to develop increased self-esteem, self-worth and to integrate into their community.

All Clients will have an up-to-date, outcome-focused support and risk management plan that is reviewed with appropriate frequency and includes input from other agencies as appropriate. Support plans will reflect any cultural, religious and lifestyle needs.  This plan will focus on stabilising or securing housing and then signposting to other agencies for ongoing support where needed with other goals.

Nos Da Kernow will initially offer information and advice and support to help people self-advocate; non-statutory advocacy will be offered when required. This includes but is not limited to helping people to complete forms and utilise online self-help tools related to independent living and self-management of health and wellbeing. Where possible and practicable, people accessing the service have opportunities to be involved in all aspects of the Service. This will include but is not limited to decision making, planning and reviewing the service, staff recruitment, induction and training, and service delivery.

No Da Kernow will undertake proactive, rapid intervention and outreach to clients referred as being at risk of homelessness and will work with, and alongside, colleagues in all partner agencies to provide those referred with the support needed to prevent them from becoming homeless.

Referral form

Nos Da Kernow Infographic

Referrals can also be sent to: supportedhousingreferrals@cornwallhousing.org.uk

 

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New commissioned street outreach response team

October 30th, 2019 by

Rough sleepers across Cornwall will receive outreach support thanks to Addaction and Cornwall Housing funded via Cornwall Council.

Addaction Cornwall, who currently provide drug and alcohol support in the area, has been awarded the Rough Sleepers Outreach Contract by Cornwall Housing.

As part of the project, Addaction outreach workers will be employed to engage and support some of Cornwall’s most vulnerable people currently living on the street. The project will run in partnership with the charity Homeless Link’s StreetLink service.

If a member of the public is concerned about someone sleeping rough they can send an alert to StreetLink through the mobile app, www.streetlink.org.uk, or by calling 0300 500 0914. The referral will be sent to Addaction Cornwall and an outreach worker will go to the location where the rough sleeper was seen at to engage and support them.

Outreach workers will develop personalised care plans for rough sleepers, supporting them into housing and treatment services. They will also carry the opioid overdose reversal drug naloxone to extend harm reduction efforts.

Lynda Edward is the Multiple Complex Needs Manager at Addaction Cornwall and will be managing the service. Lynda said:

“We know that many people who are forced to sleep on the streets have multiple complex needs such as drug and alcohol and mental health issues. Often these people can struggle to engage with services so, rather than waiting for them to come to us, this project is about proactively engaging and supporting this group. outreach workers will provide a package of care focused on helping people get the personalised support they need. This could be accompanying them to a housing appointment, helping them access drug treatment or helping them with financial issues. All support will be centred around the needs of the individual.

“No one should have to sleep rough in Cornwall or anywhere else. We believe this dedicated service can help many people start to rebuild their lives.”

Nick Cross, Cornwall Housing Managing Director adds “We recognise the passion the Addaction team have to help people make changes and improve their lives. We look forward to bringing together the newly commissioned street outreach response team with our wider services to prevent and relieve homelessness in Cornwall.

“Over the last few years Cornwall Housing has worked to reduce the number of rough sleepers across the county. I have no doubt that with Addaction’s support we will be able to support the most vulnerable so no one needs to sleep rough in Cornwall.”

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The Nominations Are…

October 29th, 2019 by

Coastline Housing Homeless Team has been nominated and short listed for a Markel 3rd Sector Care, Collaboration (Integration) Award in partnership with the Drug and Alcohol Action Team (DAAT). The nomination was for their work on the administration of Naloxone in the Coastline Housing Homeless service. The ceremony announcing the winner will take place on Friday the 6th December at London Marriott Hotel.

Coastline Housing and the DAAT have been working to support those who are rough sleeping, and experience complex needs such as drug and alcohol issues. In the past year, this service helped 1,117 people, and homes have been provided for over 4,500 families.

The use of Naloxone helps save lives in the event of an overdose, and by promoting its use they have helped encourage drug users to be open to engaging with treatment services and get support to address their behaviour.

All staff have been trained through the DAAT training program to be able to recognise signs of overdose and how to apply the key steps in saving lives. Their aim is to put these skills into their everyday work to help save lives and guide those though a positive road to recovery.

It is extremely rewarding to see the outcome of the work with Naloxone and what it has achieved. Since 2016, 41 people have been saved across complex needs supported housing providers and it is now being used in all 12 properties provided by the Coastline Housing Service. It is crucial that this work continues and it is great to see their achievements have been recognised.

Article by Chloe Crilly

 

 

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Time Credits: a success story but what does the future hold?

October 16th, 2019 by

Impact and successes

Time Credits, commissioned by Cornwall Council has been delivered by Tempo since 2017.  The project helps to support vulnerable individuals with multiple needs to better engage with and contribute to their communities by earning credits through volunteering and spending them at the various spend opportunities that have been created across the county.

The first client group was made up of people with complex and multiple needs, including drug and alcohol problems or those experiencing issues with homelessness.  The idea being that if we could make it work for our most vulnerable individuals we could make it work for anyone.   The project started in Penzance so spend partners could be successfully recruited before rolling out to other areas.  Time Credits now work with those who have experienced Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence and also with young people and has expanded across Cornwall.

This is the Cornwall Time credit that was co-produced with service users and agencies in Cornwall.  Individuals are awarded a time credit for each hour of volunteering.

 

This has been a very successful project, exceeding all targets.  There are now over 40 spend partners, including  Cornwall College, Merlin and WCT cinemas, Better Leisure; Hall for Cornwall and Flambards.  There are also 50 Earn partners/Community groups involved including Addaction, Harbour Housing, Newstart and other supported housing providers; DASV services and refuges; Young people services including the YOS and accommodation foyers.  There are 644 signed up members, which is almost 3 times more than the target of 235 people.

The Tempo National Impact on success states that:

  • 80% report improved quality of life
  • 63% feel more able to contributed to the community and other people
  • 59% share their skills with others
  • 57% feel less isolated and lonely
  • 55% develop new friends and acquaintances
  • 54% feel more positive about their future

 

One of our Earn Partners said the following:

“Supporting the residents to engage in voluntary work and being able to acknowledge and reward them is a massive boost to their confidence, self-esteem & well-being.”

Rachel Battleday, Cosgarne Hall

“Time Credits makes me more engaged and involved with STAK outings and has allowed me to try things and visit places I wouldn’t have been able to on my pension. It’s such a wonderful idea.”

St Austell Community Kitchen User

 

Moving forwards

The contract and funding for this very successful project is due to come to an end in March 2020.  It has achieved all targets; signed up almost 3 times the number of vulnerable individuals than expected.  It is now time for us to decide whether or not this project continues.

In November, a visioning day, is being planned in order to consider the options and agree the best way to progress.

 

 

 

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Multi-agency working to combat drug litter

October 16th, 2019 by

Community Safety Drug Litter ½ Year Report 2019/20

Outreach workers from Addaction and the Local Police Teams attend sites of reported drug litter to provide assertive outreach to those affected.

Members of the public are asked to report drug litter to Cornwall Council and once received this information is cascaded to Addaction and the local Police so they can attend the affected area and offer support and advice to anyone who may need it.

Over the last 6 months there have been 72 reports of drug litter to Cornwall Council and the most prevalent areas are Newquay (15), Penzance (15), St Austell (9) and Camborne (7).

Graph shows litter request for April to September 2018 compared to the same time period in 2019.

There has been a reduction in the number of drug litter requests in Penzance and St Austell. The reason for this reduction is unknown although one possible explanation is the extra time and resources dedicated to assertive outreach in these areas.

Below is a breakdown of the drug litter requests for the last 6 months for further information.

 

 

 

 

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New Service for rough sleeping

September 4th, 2019 by

Cornwall Housing Ltd (CHL), with funding from MHCLG via Cornwall Council are piloting a Navigator service and a Tenancy Sustainment Service for clients who are currently rough sleeping or who have been rough sleeping in the past.

Navigators will coordinate multiple services around a client and work with them intensively throughout their journey towards their goals. The Navigator role is much wider than housing alone  there will be a strong focus on health navigation as rough sleepers find it particularly difficult to access primary care and longer term treatments, as well as on addressing addiction, securing training, education or employment, tackling debt and budgeting issues, encouraging social inclusion and community participation and any other issue that has been identified as a barrier or challenge to securing and sustaining accommodation. Navigators will also be recruiting individuals for the new Homeless Health Peer Advocacy service (HHPA), which aims to assist clients to attend health appointments. The HHPA is an initiative which will be in partnership with Groundswell.

Tenancy Sustainment Officers can support former rough sleepers who move into other independent accommodation, including both social and private lets to maintain their tenancy, liaising with landlords and other agencies to ensure that they do not return to rough sleeping. This would be an indefinite service averaging 4 hours a week but allowing for flexibility. The Service would also operate Drop-In Surgeries, either at existing services or via telephone to enable former rough sleepers who do not require ongoing support but have a current issue (for example, loss of employment/health issues/debt or bills etc) to access support quickly in order to prevent tenancy breakdown.

Referrals will be accepted for both services from the SStS Hub; CRSOG; Outreach; Prevention & Engagement Team @ CHL; Nos Da Kernow.

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Reviewing Cornwall’s Homelessness Strategy

June 5th, 2019 by

Homelessness can affect anyone at any time. Homelessness means not having a home. You are considered  homeless if you have nowhere to stay and are living on the streets – but you can also be homeless even if you have a roof over your head. Homelessness is complex and often reflects other vulnerabilities or circumstances related to health, justice or social services. Homelessness often results from a combination of events such as relationship breakdown, debt, adverse experiences in childhood and through ill health. Homelessness can be devastating. People affected by street homelessness, the most visible form of homelessness, are almost 17 times more likely to have been victims of violence, 15 times more likely to have suffered verbal abuse in the past year and are 9 times more likely to take their own life than on average. The average age of death for someone who is homeless and rough sleeping is just 47 – thirty years younger than the national average.

We are already achieving a lot in terms of helping homeless people in Cornwall but there is so much more to be done. Cornwall’s current Homelessness Strategy needs reviewing in light of recent legislative (Homelessness Reduction Act 2017) and other changes such as the publication of the Government’s Rough Sleeping Strategy and Delivery Plan. If you work with homeless people or are just concerned about homelessness in Cornwall please get involved in helping to develop our new strategy. Consultation and engagement on the review of the strategy will run for 12 weeks from Wednesday 15th May to Wednesday 7th August 2019.

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Prince’s Trust Recruitment

June 3rd, 2019 by

 Are you looking for a new challenge?

If you are 16 – 25 and not currently in education, employment or training come along to Truro Community Fire Station on the 19th June to find out more about The Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service Prince’s Trust Team programme and how to join Team 17 starting later this month!

The programme is a 12 week development course with the aim to increase confidence, motivation and skills.

On this action packed programme you’ll take part in a community project, an exciting residential, two weeks work experience in a career of your choice and many more challenges.

You will gain regulated qualifications in Emergency First Aid at Work as well as the Princes Trust Level One Certificate in Employment, Teamwork and Community Skills. You will also have the opportunity to earn Maths and English Level One and Two if needed.

If you are interested in joining the team or would like to refer someone else please complete an online referral form at http://bit.ly/PTTInfo .

To book a place on the taster day please visit http://bit.ly/Team17TasterDay .

*This course does not affect benefits

 

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Rough sleeping

June 2nd, 2019 by

Cornwall Housing (CHL) are working with partners across the county to end rough sleeping across Cornwall. CHL have been awarded just over £970k via Cornwall Council to set up and run a number of 12 month projects aimed at further reducing rough sleeping. Adding to existing projects and initiatives funded via CHL, Cornwall Council and the MHCLG (Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government) 4 new projects are in the process of being set up. These projects will be:

 

  • A Somewhere Safe to Stay (SStS) hub. This will be a rapid assessment centre providing sit up space 24/7 for rough sleepers and those at risk of rough sleeping as a safe place to go, be assessed and then moved on into more sustainable housing as appropriate. This may be a move into a night shelter, into temporary accommodation via CHL, into a hostel or other supported accommodation, into a Short Term Accommodation and Resettlement (STAR) unit, into a Housing First Property or into the private rented sector. The SStS project will provide a roaming hub based out of existing community provision. It will move location every 6 weeks to ensure full county coverage. CHL will engage with local embers and organisations in the set-up of the hubs. At present locations in Truro, Penzance and Falmouth have been identified with additional sites in Newquay and St Austell currently being explored.

 

  • A Supported Lodgings scheme. This will provide tenancy sustainment to those moving into their own properties who have a history of rough sleeping to enable them to gain the skills needed to live independently going forwards without further risk of homelessness.

 

  • A new Navigator service which will support those with multiple/complex needs throughout their journey off the streets and into independence. The navigator service will be a single point of contact for all agencies involved with those supported and will coordinate support around them. As part of this service we will also be setting up a Homeless Health Peer Advocacy (HHPA) service in partnership with Groundswell. This service will work with those who have experience of homelessness and rough sleeping training them up to become peer mentors to those in need, encouraging and supporting access to health services and in engaging with services that can support a move away from the streets.

 

  • Expanding Cornwall Housing Private Lets team into the North and East of the County to provide a social lettings agency, supporting those with experience of homelessness to move into the private rented sector. Tenancy sustainment support across the county will now also be provided as part of this – one in the North and East and one down West.

 

If you would like more information on these projects or wish to get involved please contact Jude Cross, Rough Sleeping Strategic Lead on Judith.cross@cornwallhousing.org.uk

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Safer Towns One Year On

March 8th, 2019 by

Our Safer Towns Scheme, developed and coordinated by our Community Safety Team, facilitates and supports a coordinated multi-agency approach to community safety issues, to improve feelings of safety and public reassurance, reduce the risk of harm to the community and protect vulnerable groups. The partnerships work to reduce and prevent crime, disorder and anti-social behaviour. The scheme was launched last April with full governance developed for each of the towns which include; Penzance, Camborne and Redruth, Falmouth, Truro, Newquay, St Austell, Bodmin, Saltash and Liskeard. The team have successfully established the new Safer Towns and broadened the remit of the three Safer Towns which were already in existence.

An enormous amount of work has taken place over the last year to establish partnership arrangements and develop delivery plans based on crime information provided by our Amethyst Team through Town Profiles and feedback from the Cornwall Council Residents Survey.  New Town Profiles have recently been provided to the Safer Towns with delivery plans for 2019/20 being developed currently to account for changes in crime trends and also emerging issues for next year.

The scheme was supported by the Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) with £5,000 allocated to each town. Partners have reviewed priorities and put forward proposals for how the funding should be spent locally. There are a number of new exciting projects, campaigns and outcomes which have been delivered in 2018/19 and will be put in place during 2019/20 through the support of the PCC.

All Safer Towns meet on a regular basis to share current intelligence, raise concerns and deal with emerging dynamic issues collectively. A key factor in the success of the scheme is the wide membership of the groups, which include; public, private and voluntary organisations; who are able to feed in local intelligence and local issues. Each town is unique with different community safety priorities, however there have also been a number of initiatives which have been rolled out through all the Safer Towns.

A shoplifting prevention briefing presented by Devon and Cornwall Police’s Crime Prevention Officer has been organised for all Safer Towns, this provides practical information to local businesses and security teams of how to protect themselves from thefts. It also included information on evidence collection and the process around this. We received positive feedback from the sessions run to date and look to run more sessions in the future.

Blue Light Training has been provided to three pilot towns across the County; Penzance, St Austell and Bodmin. Blue Light supports individuals who are change resistant, problematic drug and alcohol users not engaged with treatment, regularly presenting to emergency services. A multi-agency meeting in each of the towns will provide a mechanism to discuss individuals on a regular basis to collectively provide full support.

A large focus for a number of the towns has been concerns around street drinking and vulnerable individuals; awareness work to ensure the public and communities are aware of local support and who to report concerns to has been extremely important in ensuring the right agencies are informed. Multi-agency walkabouts has been effective in providing reassurance to the public and businesses, targeting specific areas where we have been receiving complaints/concerns raised.

Brief overview of a few of the key initiatives which have been delivered in the towns;

  • Agreement to develop and open a town centre community safety hub accessible to the public in Penzance. The lease has been secured by Cornwall Council Nov 2018. Fire Safety assessment and remedial work in progress.
  • A 12 month pilot has been jointly funded by Penzance Town Council and Cornwall Council for an ASB Caseworker specific to Penzance. This post will be recruited to in March.
  • Agreed siting of two sharps bins in the Camborne both bins will be funded from the PCC Safer Town seed funding.
  • Safer Camborne and Safer Redruth have facilitated a review of local service provision for young people in the area. It has identified the need for a youth café in the Redruth area which will provide a safe space for local young people to go. This is still in the planning process; Safer Towns funding for Redruth will contribute to the opening of Redruth Youth Café, the facility will open in September 2019
  • In Redruth, Police and Community Safety staff are piloting monthly joint surgeries for the public regarding ASB concerns
  • Safer Camborne, Safer Redruth and Safer Penzance have held awareness days in each of the towns in order to promote activity regarding anti-social behaviour and crime to reassure public and raise awareness of partnership working in the area;
  • Shop Watch has been introduced to businesses in Redruth and Camborne, which allows shop staff to communicate with each other with the aim to reduce shoplifting by identifying prolific offenders. This is still in its infancy but training from the police prevention officer will be commencing in early 2019.
  • Safer Falmouth provided information to members of the public at Gyllyngvase Beach following public safety concerns. The events were held to provide awareness of the risk to others from leaving barbeques on the beach, as well as the harmful environmental impact.
  • Following an incident of drink spiking Safer Falmouth ran an awareness campaign to local residents. The partnership provided leaflets to households throughout Falmouth outlining how to keep safe whilst drinking as well as offering safety equipment for bottles. Falmouth University and Exeter University also provided awareness to students on the What Will Your Drink Cost campaign.
  • Truro Safe have conducted two walkabouts throughout the City, providing businesses with key contact information, as well as the opportunity to raise any concerns and find out about the work of the partnership.
  • Following concerns of access for emergency services due to poorly parked vehicles blocking roads within Killigrew Gardens, St Erme, Truro Safe; led by Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service, implemented the Think Before You Park initiative. Partners visited households throughout the area and left leaflets highlighting the responsibility drivers have to ensure that roads are accessible and the implications, if this is not considered, on emergency service response.
  • Truro Safe continues to have donation boxes available throughout the City which supports those within the City who are homeless. The partnership was pleased to provide sleeping bags and fund two outreach worker packs using the latest donations from members of the public.
  • Safer St Austell visited residents of St Blazey in August to discuss local issues following concerns that had been made and provide information on support available. Residents reiterated their concerns; which included noise nuisance. The walkabout was successful with approximately 27 households engaged. The partnership also spoke to young people in the community to understand what concerns they have and how these may be addressed. The partnership will be looking into the feedback that was provided and potential changes that could be made, which could positively impact on the issues faced by the community.
  • Further work needed to take place regarding public perception of crime within St Austell; Safer St Austell has updated the Communications Plan to take account of this priority. The objectives continue to be to promote successes and the work of the partnership, target engagement to best address concerns of safety and ensure negative concerns are addressed swiftly and effectively. The group have increased articles for local publications and the website along with social media posts. They have also updated the Community Action Days calendar for 2018/19 to promote the work of the partnership and support services including a very successful Sleep Out Event which raised awareness of homelessness. A new scheme was also introduced following this event to support the local homeless charity and promote signposting.
  • Safer Bodmin has received a full briefing on current county lines activity in the Town from the Police Intelligence Directorate. The group has prioritised raising public awareness of this complex crime and will focus on vulnerability and building resilience.
  • Mapping the services available in Bodmin against the nine reducing reoffending pathways is underway. Once any gaps have been identified it is Safer Bodmin’s ambition to influence and potentially fund services to meet the local needs.
  • Safer Bodmin have supported the Berryfields Community Centre and agreed to contribute towards the funding of this vital youth provision in the town. Planning is also underway on a youth focused event with the Bodmin Watch; this event will be based on the Junior Life Skills events and will incorporate an art work competition with the pupils from Bodmin College.  Additionally, during March 2019 Safer Bodmin will run a survey with pupils from Bodmin College to seek their views on community safety in the town and what activities they engage with and would want to see in Bodmin.  The results of this survey will inform future plans for 2019.20.
  • In Saltash there have been a number of sessions delivered to pupils and parents of Saltash.net School to raise awareness about drug misuse. These have included sessions on the impact of drug use from the police as well as harm reduction / mental health education delivered from YZUP (young persons’ substance misuse service). Safer Saltash have been working closely with Saltash.net secondary school and have recently supported their BeWell whole school drop down day focused on mental wellbeing.
  • Safer Saltash have met with the Tamar Bridge Committee to discuss the issue of people completing suicide off the Tamar Bridge. Further work in partnership with the Committee will now take place with a focus on suicide prevention. Additionally, a recent presentation at a Safer Saltash meeting from the Public Health Healthy Promotions team resulted in a decision by the group to offer a ‘Suicide Talk’ (3 hours) to a multi-disciplined group in Saltash focusing on businesses and community groups (up to 90 delegates).  Following on from this, a core group will be identified and trained in ASIST (2 days) and become Suicide First Aiders.
  • Safer Saltash identified ASB as a priority area; the group have focused on this and supported the Core’s successful OPCC bid for ‘The Friday Night Project’ and provided funding for the Saltmill initiative for young people.  Saltash has a current seasonal issue with tombstoning and work is underway to revise a leaflet containing safety advice on tombstoning and letters have been sent from Safer Saltash to Network Rail regarding concerns over access to the Network Rail owned pillar where young people are tombstoning from.  The group have also agreed to part fund a body worn camera for the local ASB caseworker.  The group are also exploring the opportunity for the Town and Waterfront Wardens to be granted Community Safety Accreditation Scheme (CSAS) powers.
  • Safer Liskeard has made an evidence based decision to purchase a needle disposal unit to be located outside the Town Council owned Sungirt Toilets. A local arrangement has been reached with regards to the safe emptying and disposal of the clinical waste and signage and comms are currently being developed to support this initiative.
  • Safer Liskeard supported National Domestic Abuse week and held a successful public engagement event at Liskeard Community Hospital on 30th November 18. The Healthy Relationships Programme has been delivered in Liskeard Secondary School and the group will be utilising some of the OPCC funding to purchase mobile phones and personal attack alarms for Domestic Abuse victims in the town.  These crime prevention/safety resources will be managed by the IDVA locally.
  • The Safer Liskeard team have identified Castle Park as an area for environmental improvement activity and have conducted a site visit to the area. This activity aims to promote residents taking pride in their town whilst improving feelings of safety and will complement the soon to be reformed ‘Friends of Castle Park’ group.  The work will include targeted multi-agency outreach; consultation with residents; fundraising for play equipment; organised activities in the park; a link to the Time Credits project and CRC unpaid work involvement in remedial work in the park.

What’s coming up?

  • Blue Light Scheme to be implemented across all towns;
  • Specialist Youth Programme led by our Phoenix Team developed to support young people involved with crime and potentially deter them through engagement;
  • Community Action Days to be completed for 2019 including a youth engagement event in Bodmin, joint Engagement events with the OPCC in all Safer Towns and walkabouts within most of the Safer Towns;
  • Initial scoping work is now taking place for a diversity festival in Bodmin to celebrate multi-cultural food and music. The purpose of this work is to build community resilience, break down barriers and promote cohesion.
  • Safer Liskeard will have a community safety stand at Liskeard Community Fair on Saturday 30th March; and Safer Saltash will be at the Saltash Regatta. These events will involve all partners and the OPCC road show van and will be a fantastic opportunity to engage with residents and to understand their needs in relation to crime, disorder and community safety.
  • Truro Safe signage to be fitted at various locations across Truro, providing information on support services;
  • Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence campaign for Truro to be piloted;
  • A number of campaigns to be developed in Newquay including; drug litter, thefts, water safety concerns;
  • Review of noise nuisance complaints 2018 and contact procedure for complaints for Falmouth;
  • working with Heartlands (Pool) business manager, residents and partner agencies to set up a Residents Community Safety Group;
  • young people’s services networking event to be held in Camborne
  • a focus on business engagement and training in Penzance
  • Mobile CCTV camera usage being investigated in Penzance and Redruth.
  • a focused countywide campaign to encourage reporting of crime and ASB to the appropriate numbers

We want to thank all the partners who have been involved with the schemes and continue to support the work of the partnership. If you would like to find out more about a particularly Safer Town please visit https://safercornwall.co.uk/safer-towns/ or email communitysafety@cornwall.gov.uk.  Please follow East Cornwall Community Safety Officer on Twitter here  https://twitter.com/LucyAllison_CSO

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Safer Cornwall are a working partnership involving: