Tri-Safety Service Officers

April 17th, 2019 by
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Camborne property ‘closed’ in anti-social behaviour clamp down

April 17th, 2019 by
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‘Peer on peer’ child exploitation highlighted as concern in the South West

March 18th, 2019 by

Children across the south west are victims of sexual exploitation.  But while media reports often highlight cases of adult grooming and child abuse, Devon and Cornwall Police say the most likely form of child sexual exploitation (CSE) in the south west is perpetrated by other young people.

It’s sometimes referred to as ‘peer on peer’ exploitation, and its victims are young males and young females.

“People may be unaware that CSE can be perpetrated by young people aged 18 or younger, and they themselves may also have been victims of CSE,” says Detective Chief Inspector Alison Lander, Devon & Cornwall Police and Force lead for CSE.

Recent research led by Plymouth’s Safeguarding Children’s Board found little awareness and understanding among young people of peer on peer sexual exploitation.

Their research showed that this form of exploitation in particular was not widely recognised or understood as a crime, which is preventing children from reporting it.

They found that young people are also not reporting sexual exploitation because they worry that doing so would lose them friendships; they’re concerned about how their parents might react; or that they’ll be seen as wasting police time.

Monday 18 March is a national awareness day for highlighting CSE.  Authorities across the South West are using the day to say to children and young people, “If you are put in a situation where you feel pressured sexually, please report it.  It’s OK to tell someone.”

Lisa, (not her real name).

Lisa is 15 years old and lives with her mother.  She began to go missing, leaving the house during the middle of the night to meet peers, and there were concerns about her drinking alcohol during while out.

Her behaviour in school and at home deteriorated with no clear reason.   Her mum found information on Lisa’s phone, indicating that she had become sexually active,  and having unprotected sex.

Lisa said that she’d exchanged indecent images of herself with some of boys at her school.

On occasions that she went missing, Lisa was drinking alcohol and smoking cannabis with her male friends.  She’d had sex with one of the boys while under the influence, and he’d told his friends about it.

Lisa started getting messages from other boys asking her to send pictures of herself in her underwear.  Lisa felt uncomfortable, but said ‘everyone sends nudes’.  And besides, she felt it was nice to have boys be interested in her in that way.

One boy said that he could get some cannabis, and he offered some to Lisa in exchange for sex.  She’s thought he was joking, but the boy repeated it a few times and on a later occasion with him, she went along with what he asked.

Regional Head of Service for the NSPCC, Sharon Copsey, says:  “Having early conversations about healthy relationships and consent is vital to tackling child sexual exploitation before it starts. We know that young people don’t always understand that what’s happening to them is abuse.”

Detective Chief Inspector Alison Lander, said: “Many young people who are being exploited do not realise they are at risk and will not ask for help.  Some may see themselves as willing participants in such abuse, not realising that what is happening to them is illegal.  It’s a difficult message to convey to young people, but it’s really important that they are aware of risk and how to avoid it.  Crucially they need to know how to report it, and to have confidence to do so.

“The public can really help us detect and prevent CSE among young people by knowing the signs and reporting any concerns they have.

“It’s not just parents, or teachers and carers who can help spot the signs of CSE.  Anyone working in a service industry, such as taxi drivers and hotel workers, shop keepers; anyone who may be able to spot vulnerable young people who may be at risk of exploitation or in an exploitative relationship – can also help to spot the signs and to report any concerns.”

Andy Bickley, Independent Chair of Plymouth Safeguarding Children’s Board, said: “We are committed to working with local organisations to tackle child sexual abuse and exploitation and CSE Day is the ideal opportunity to help improve awareness.

“This latest research shows that it isn’t just adults that exploit children and young people, it can also be their peers, so it’s really important that we make sure our young people know what the dangers are, and also what support is available.”

Schools across the South West and services that work with young people are actively raising awareness of CSE among young people.  Parents and guardians are being encouraged to do the same at home.

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Cornwall County Police Headquarters – opening ceremony

February 8th, 2019 by

On Monday 28 January 2019 the Lord Lieutenant of Cornwall officially opened Bodmin police station as police headquarters for Cornwall and Isles of Scilly.

Around 50 former police officers joined Chief Constable Shaun Sawyer, PCC Alison Hernandez, Cornwall Commander Chief Superintendent Jim Pearce and members of the public and politicians to watch a plaque being unveiled to commemorate the opening.

 

 

The dedication comes ahead of a £13m investment in the police estate in Cornwall, funded by the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner and will significantly improve facilities for staff and members of the public and see the creation of a substantial new custody facility.

For more information click here

 

 

 

 

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Partnership working secures two closure orders on premises in Penzance & St Ives

January 30th, 2019 by
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Safer Liskeard

December 10th, 2018 by

Six months after the launch of Safer Liskeard, the town is already seeing the benefits of bringing its community safety partners together.

The group includes representatives from Cornwall Council, Liskeard Town Council, the police, fire service, and other agencies, who have targeted a set of key priorities to help improve community safety and reduce crime and anti-social behaviour.

Based on the findings from the residents’ survey and crime data the team have identified four key priorities to tackle in the coming months:

  1. Problem drug use/dangerous drug networks/county lines/cuckooing and the associated violence
  2. Domestic abuse
  3. Taking Pride in Liskeard and improved feelings of safety
  4. Comms, community engagement and building community resilience

Some steps have already been taken, including a plan to install a ‘sharps bin’ for drug litter outside the Sungirt toilets in the town.

The team also took part in Op Aident in September, which involved multi agency site visits to hotels and B&Bs in the town centre to raise awareness of child sexual exploitation and how to spot the signs.

Safer Liskeard also had a multi-agency stand at Liskeard Community Hospital during national Domestic Abuse week.

Future action will focus on a Community Safety Section at Liskeard Community Fair in March 2019, police-led shoplifting prevention training for local businesses in January and concentrated partnership activity in areas highlighted as problematic and targeted outreach with young people will take place.

Lucy Allison, Community Safety Officer for East Cornwall said:  “In the six months since its launch, Safer Liskeard has been engaging with the public and partners to see where our focus should be in the town, and we have already identified some key areas for action.

“Liskeard is a fantastic place to live and work, and we want to ensure it remains that way, and to help residents grow an even stronger feeling of pride in the town.

Residents and businesses… Report It!

If people experience anti-social behaviour; email 101@dc.police.uk, telephone 101 or use contact form here 

In an emergency call 999

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Partial Premises Closure in Camborne

December 7th, 2018 by

A team of agencies have worked in partnership to secure a partial closure of a premises in Camborne.

Those involved were members of the Camborne, Pool and Redruth Neighbourhood Policing Team, Coastline Housing Association and Anti-social Behaviour Caseworker Dorian Thomas.

The closure was applied for in response to a catalogue of reports of crime, anti-social behaviour and disorder at the address which was having a significant impact on its neighbours.  Efforts were made to engage with the tenant of the address, offering support to help address the issues at the root of the problems before an application for a closure was decided upon.

The partial closure that has been granted allows the only the tenant to have access to the property.  As the recorded incidents all involved visitors to the address, the hope is that this will prevent further issues and give local residents the ability to enjoys their homes without feeling scared, intimidated and being disturbed at all hours of the day and night.

Police and partner agencies are able to draw on a broad range of powers and legislation to tackle the whole spectrum of issues associated with anti-social behaviour.  The first step is always for members of the public to talk to report issues that are affecting them.  This can be done online at www.devon-cornwall.police.uk or by calling 101

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Criminal Behaviour Order (CBO)

December 7th, 2018 by

On 31st October 2018, Cornwall Magistrates Court granted a 2 year Criminal Behaviour Order on Mr Christopher Aaron German with the following prohibitions:

MUST NOT:

  1. ENTER OR ATTEMPT TO ENTER PREMISES WHICH YOU ARE BANNED FROM.
  • SUPERDRUG 5-9 TRELOWARREN STREET CAMBORNE TR14 8AD
  • TESCO STORES, STATION ROAD POOL REDRUTH TR15 3QJ.
  • MORRISONS, AGAR ROAD, ILLOGAN HIGHWAY, POOL, REDRUTH TR15 3NH
  1. REMAIN IN ANY COMMERCIAL PREMISES IN CORNWALL IF ASKED TO LEAVE BY A MEMBER OF STAFF, MANAGER OR PREMISES OWNER.

CBO – Order Poster – Aaron

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Child Sexual Exploitation Campaign

September 25th, 2018 by

Our Safeguarding Children Partnership and Safer Cornwall is coordinating and supporting an education campaign aimed at the hospitality industry as part of a wider Devon and Cornwall Police campaign called ‘I didn’t know’ from 26th to 28th September 2018.

It follows on from the National Child Sexual Exploitation Day in March 2018 and highlights how the hospitality industry may spot signs and report and gain support.

Child exploitation is a form of abuse that involves the manipulation or coercion of young people into sexual or criminal activity, and there have been many harrowing stories where children have been targeted and groomed.

The ‘I didn’t know’ message aims to highlight child sexual exploitation and encourage everyone to adopt a zero tolerance to the exploitation of children.

Hotels and B&Bs are in a unique position to help – evidence shows that accommodation is often used as a location to meet, groom and abuse children (both girls and boys).

Exploited children are almost always too terrified to ask for help themselves.  Receptionists, managers and housekeepers are in a unique position to notice when someone or something seems suspicious or may not all be ok with young guests.  By passing their concerns on to the police, they could potentially save a child from exploitation/further exploitation.

A leaflet will be provided within walkabouts across 5 of the Safer Towns in Cornwall by local police neighbourhood policing teams and partners, and will be followed up by a larger campaign before peak season next year to provide advice and support to the industry.  Not all accommodation providers will be visited on this occasion but providers and the general public can gain more information by going to:

  1. ‘I didn’t know’ campaign dc.police.uk/CSE

2.  Hotel watch – www.dc.police.uk/hotelwatch

 

 

 

 

#knowthesigns

#saysomething

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Police warning over substance abuse – Two girls hospitalised

August 1st, 2018 by

Police warning over substance abuse

Detectives in Bodmin are currently investigating an incident which left two teenagers needing medical assistance following suspected substance abuse in Bodmin.

Officers were notified at about 11:00pm Sunday 29 July to reports of two teenage girls who had taken an unknown substance and became very unwell as a result.

The girls, a 16-year-old and a 17-year-old, were both taken to Treliske Hospital where their condition was stabilised. The 16-year-old girl was later released from hospital, the 17-year-old girl is currently recovering in hospital.

DC Andy Petherick said: “The substance that these girls are believed to have taken came in the form of yellow tablets which were in the shape of a shield with ‘EA7’ written on them, similar to the one pictured.

“We are urging young people to stay away from substances. You do not know what is in them or how strong the drug may be or how your body will react to them.”

Anybody with information about this incident are asked to contact police via 101@dc.police.uk or by calling 101 and quote log number 989 29/07/2018

 

 

 

https://www.devon-cornwall.police.uk/News/NewsArticle.aspx?id=e5f87eac-1c6f-49ca-ba0f-f71f9de860f8

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Safer Cornwall are a working partnership involving: