Safer Liskeard

December 10th, 2018 by

Six months after the launch of Safer Liskeard, the town is already seeing the benefits of bringing its community safety partners together.

The group includes representatives from Cornwall Council, Liskeard Town Council, the police, fire service, and other agencies, who have targeted a set of key priorities to help improve community safety and reduce crime and anti-social behaviour.

Based on the findings from the residents’ survey and crime data the team have identified four key priorities to tackle in the coming months:

  1. Problem drug use/dangerous drug networks/county lines/cuckooing and the associated violence
  2. Domestic abuse
  3. Taking Pride in Liskeard and improved feelings of safety
  4. Comms, community engagement and building community resilience

Some steps have already been taken, including a plan to install a ‘sharps bin’ for drug litter outside the Sungirt toilets in the town.

The team also took part in Op Aident in September, which involved multi agency site visits to hotels and B&Bs in the town centre to raise awareness of child sexual exploitation and how to spot the signs.

Safer Liskeard also had a multi-agency stand at Liskeard Community Hospital during national Domestic Abuse week.

Future action will focus on a Community Safety Section at Liskeard Community Fair in March 2019, police-led shoplifting prevention training for local businesses in January and concentrated partnership activity in areas highlighted as problematic and targeted outreach with young people will take place.

Lucy Allison, Community Safety Officer for East Cornwall said:  “In the six months since its launch, Safer Liskeard has been engaging with the public and partners to see where our focus should be in the town, and we have already identified some key areas for action.

“Liskeard is a fantastic place to live and work, and we want to ensure it remains that way, and to help residents grow an even stronger feeling of pride in the town.

Residents and businesses… Report It!

If people experience anti-social behaviour; email 101@dc.police.uk, telephone 101 or use contact form here 

In an emergency call 999

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Partial Premises Closure in Camborne

December 7th, 2018 by

A team of agencies have worked in partnership to secure a partial closure of a premises in Camborne.

Those involved were members of the Camborne, Pool and Redruth Neighbourhood Policing Team, Coastline Housing Association and Anti-social Behaviour Caseworker Dorian Thomas.

The closure was applied for in response to a catalogue of reports of crime, anti-social behaviour and disorder at the address which was having a significant impact on its neighbours.  Efforts were made to engage with the tenant of the address, offering support to help address the issues at the root of the problems before an application for a closure was decided upon.

The partial closure that has been granted allows the only the tenant to have access to the property.  As the recorded incidents all involved visitors to the address, the hope is that this will prevent further issues and give local residents the ability to enjoys their homes without feeling scared, intimidated and being disturbed at all hours of the day and night.

Police and partner agencies are able to draw on a broad range of powers and legislation to tackle the whole spectrum of issues associated with anti-social behaviour.  The first step is always for members of the public to talk to report issues that are affecting them.  This can be done online at www.devonandcornwall.police.uk or by calling 101

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Criminal Behaviour Order (CBO)

December 7th, 2018 by

On 31st October 2018, Cornwall Magistrates Court granted a 2 year Criminal Behaviour Order on Mr Christopher Aaron German with the following prohibitions:

MUST NOT:

  1. ENTER OR ATTEMPT TO ENTER PREMISES WHICH YOU ARE BANNED FROM.
  • SUPERDRUG 5-9 TRELOWARREN STREET CAMBORNE TR14 8AD
  • TESCO STORES, STATION ROAD POOL REDRUTH TR15 3QJ.
  • MORRISONS, AGAR ROAD, ILLOGAN HIGHWAY, POOL, REDRUTH TR15 3NH
  1. REMAIN IN ANY COMMERCIAL PREMISES IN CORNWALL IF ASKED TO LEAVE BY A MEMBER OF STAFF, MANAGER OR PREMISES OWNER.

CBO – Order Poster – Aaron

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Child Sexual Exploitation Campaign

September 25th, 2018 by

Our Safeguarding Children Partnership and Safer Cornwall is coordinating and supporting an education campaign aimed at the hospitality industry as part of a wider Devon and Cornwall Police campaign called ‘I didn’t know’ from 26th to 28th September 2018.

It follows on from the National Child Sexual Exploitation Day in March 2018 and highlights how the hospitality industry may spot signs and report and gain support.

Child exploitation is a form of abuse that involves the manipulation or coercion of young people into sexual or criminal activity, and there have been many harrowing stories where children have been targeted and groomed.

The ‘I didn’t know’ message aims to highlight child sexual exploitation and encourage everyone to adopt a zero tolerance to the exploitation of children.

Hotels and B&Bs are in a unique position to help – evidence shows that accommodation is often used as a location to meet, groom and abuse children (both girls and boys).

Exploited children are almost always too terrified to ask for help themselves.  Receptionists, managers and housekeepers are in a unique position to notice when someone or something seems suspicious or may not all be ok with young guests.  By passing their concerns on to the police, they could potentially save a child from exploitation/further exploitation.

A leaflet will be provided within walkabouts across 5 of the Safer Towns in Cornwall by local police neighbourhood policing teams and partners, and will be followed up by a larger campaign before peak season next year to provide advice and support to the industry.  Not all accommodation providers will be visited on this occasion but providers and the general public can gain more information by going to:

  1. ‘I didn’t know’ campaign dc.police.uk/CSE

2.  Hotel watch – www.dc.police.uk/hotelwatch

 

 

 

 

#knowthesigns

#saysomething

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Police warning over substance abuse – Two girls hospitalised

August 1st, 2018 by

Police warning over substance abuse

Detectives in Bodmin are currently investigating an incident which left two teenagers needing medical assistance following suspected substance abuse in Bodmin.

Officers were notified at about 11:00pm Sunday 29 July to reports of two teenage girls who had taken an unknown substance and became very unwell as a result.

The girls, a 16-year-old and a 17-year-old, were both taken to Treliske Hospital where their condition was stabilised. The 16-year-old girl was later released from hospital, the 17-year-old girl is currently recovering in hospital.

DC Andy Petherick said: “The substance that these girls are believed to have taken came in the form of yellow tablets which were in the shape of a shield with ‘EA7’ written on them, similar to the one pictured.

“We are urging young people to stay away from substances. You do not know what is in them or how strong the drug may be or how your body will react to them.”

Anybody with information about this incident are asked to contact police via 101@dc.police.uk or by calling 101 and quote log number 989 29/07/2018

 

 

 

https://www.devon-cornwall.police.uk/News/NewsArticle.aspx?id=e5f87eac-1c6f-49ca-ba0f-f71f9de860f8

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New powers help Cornwall Council and Police tackle criminal private landlords

July 17th, 2018 by
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Safer Towns Delivery

July 12th, 2018 by

In April 2018 our Safer Towns Scheme successfully launched in ten towns, which expanded on the scheme originally in place in St Austell, Truro, Newquay and Penzance.

The aim of Safer Towns is to improve community safety and reduce crime and anti-social behaviour by targeting persistent problem places and people within the geographical areas and work with communities, partners and the business and voluntary sectors to develop sustainable solutions.

Applying an evidence based approach, the local partnerships have been developing their delivery plans that are focused on activity that will respond to:

o   The Safer Town Profiles (annual refresh);

o   Cornwall Residents Survey (4 yearly);

o   ‘Have Your Say’ Survey and other engagement mechanisms (6 monthly);

o   Adverse trends in crime and anti-social behaviour and other community safety issues as evidenced through the Safer Cornwall Performance Framework.

Since the launch events in April, the Safer Town partnerships have met and there have been two multi-agency operational groups implemented to deal with emerging concerns within Truro and Penzance. There has been an increase in outreach support and patrols from Devon and Cornwall Police and our Anti-Social Behaviour Team. The support and enforcement agencies meet regularly to continue to share current knowledge about individuals and ensure a joint response and support is in place for them. A multi-agency sub-group is being pulled together to focus on serious organised crime/dangerous drug networks.

The Safer Towns have also undertaken four community action days and a walkabout, which was specifically organised to reassure businesses and the public that action is being taken, to encourage people to report any concerns and explain how to report.  Several Safer Towns have also engaged with the public at various events including Cornwall County Show.  Further community action days are planned for the ten towns and we would welcome your involvement.

We have been working with services across the Council to resolve local issues and understand the best way to deal with concerns of community safety. Over the next six months we will be looking at specific concerns within our local areas whilst embedding the partnerships and delivering tangible outcomes in the towns.

 

 

If you would like to find out more please contact Community Safety on communitysafety@cornwall.gov.uk

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Campaign to raise awareness of County Lines

July 4th, 2018 by

County Lines

Know the signs

Police have today, Tuesday 3 July, launched a campaign to raise awareness of County Lines and how the public can help spot the signs of such criminal activity ongoing in their community.

County Lines is a term used to describe urban gangs supplying drugs to other parts of the UK using dedicated mobile phone lines. The gangs are likely to exploit children or vulnerable adults to move and store drugs and they will often use coercion.

This is a national trend and there are criminal gangs using the County Lines operating model across Devon and Cornwall.

The Force’s County Lines lead, Detective Superintendent Antony Hart, said: “This week we are launching our County Lines campaign and as part of our ongoing commitment in tackling this nationwide phenomenon, we are now appealing to the public to spot the signs within their communities.

“Our recent policing activity over the last year shows that our counties are not a safe haven for drugs supply chains and anyone coming to the area intending to be involved in drugs will face prosecution.

“We have teams across the force area who focus on disrupting these drugs supply lines and on protecting the vulnerable people who become victims of crime. We also work closely with other forces, regionally and nationally, as well as the Regional Organised Crime Unit, to share intelligence and best practice to target drug suppliers.

“Neighbourhood teams and response officers are regularly patrolling areas that are used for ‘street dealing’ creating an environment where there is no safe place left to hide.

“County Lines gangs will often target children and young people, women and vulnerable adults to deliver drugs and money between locations.

“An operating base is also an essential feature of the County Lines criminal model. Gangs will regularly exploit vulnerable people, forcing them to build up a debt or using threats of violence in order to take over a person’s home, a practice known as ‘cuckooing’.

“Police have worked to identify people who may be either susceptible to, or victims of, drugs networks who use their homes to ‘set-up shop’. Once into the address drug dealers use this as a base to run their activity for short periods of time before moving on.

“Any address that has previously been used is entered onto a database and then visited by Neighbourhood teams. This relies on good working relationships between local partners, housing providers and tenants. This process also provides opportunities for rehabilitation and rehousing to break the cycle of vulnerability and offending where relevant.

“By consistently visiting people in our community we aim to reduce the risk of people becoming repeat victims of cuckooing and to continue to build the intelligence picture to ensure that other people are not put at risk of harm from Organised Crime Groups.

“We have continued to keep up this level of activity and in 2018 have continued to visit addresses where ‘live’ cuckooing is suspected to be taking place.

“We recognise that County Lines drug supply is a problem that cannot be solved by the police alone. We will continue to work with our partner agencies and our communities to tackle the issue, sending a clear message to drug suppliers that they are not welcome in Devon, Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly.”

Signs to look out for:

A young person’s involvement in county lines often leaves signs, below are some of the indicators of county lines involvement and exploitation:

  • A child or young person going missing from school or home or significant changes in emotional well-being
  • A person meeting unfamiliar adults or a change to their behaviour
  • The use of drugs and alcohol
  • Acquiring money or expensive gifts they can’t account for
  • Lone children from outside of the area
  • Individuals with multiple mobile phones or tablets or ‘SIM cards’
  • Young people with more money, expensive clothing, or accessories than they can account for
  • Unknown or suspicious looking characters coming and going from a neighbour’s house
  • Relationships with controlling or older individuals or associated with gangs
  • Suspicion of self-harm, physical assault or unexplained injuries

Gangs may also target women who tend to be drug users or have engaged in a relationship with a gang member. They can become victims of sexual and domestic violence and can also be coerced into delivery drugs or money for the gang.

Vulnerable adults who are in financial difficulties or who have mental health problems are usually the most likely victim of cuckooing.

What can you do?

If you have concerns surrounding children, follow safeguarding procedures and share your concerns with local authority social care services.

If you are being affected by any of the above or know someone who is then contact police via 101@dc.police.uk or by calling 101.

Alternatively you can call Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

Further information on County Lines can be found on our website: www.dc.police.uk/countylines

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Closure Order

March 30th, 2018 by

Camborne Neighbourhood Police, working in partnership with Cornwall Council’s Anti-Social Behaviour Co-ordinator Dorian Thomas, recently made an application to the court to place a Closure Order on 81 Enys Road, Camborne due to ongoing anti-social behaviour and disorder.

Today, 21st March 2018, this Closure Order has been granted at Truro Magistrates Court, which will ensure the property will be boarded up and made secure.

The Closure Order prevents anyone from accessing the property for 3 months from the date of issue. Anyone entering the premises in this time is in breach of the Closure Order and therefore committing a criminal offence.

PCSO Regan has stated “we have been working tirelessly to collate evidence for this closure order and will continue to work closely with the Anti-Social Behaviour Co-Ordinator to support the public to report any further anti-social behaviour. Today we are relieved that we’re able to board the property up in an effort to break the cycle of behaviour and disorder emanating from this address.”

Dorian Thomas from Cornwall Council’s ASB Team stated “it is totally unacceptable for any member of the public to allow this type of behaviour to emanate from their property and for it to be out of control.

Those residing or visiting the premises had a total disregard for the surrounding community, who were affected by the ongoing behaviour.

The amount of community concern, which this property has prompted, was clear to see and reinforced the need for the team doing as much as physically possible to make this closure a reality. This property needed to be closed down to protect the public and give local residents the respite they deserve.

Having the court grant the closure order on the 21st March 2018 is a great testament to the hard work placed by the local Police Neighbourhood Team in partnership with Cornwall Council.

The public has a right and need to be protected from such behaviour and to come home to a place where they feel safe and enjoy quality of life. The public must have the confidence and reassurance to report anti-social behaviour. By reporting this type of behaviour will assist in making our streets and towns a more pleasant place to socialise and live.”

The public are encouraged to report suspected breaches of this order or anti-social behaviour to Police using 101 or 999 in an emergency. Alternatively you can report anonymously via Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.

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Learner drivers on motorways from 4 June 2018

March 6th, 2018 by

Learner drivers can take motorway driving lessons with an approved driving instructor from 4 June 2018

From Monday 4 June 2018, learner drivers will be able to take driving lessons on motorways in England, Scotland and Wales.

This will help to make sure more drivers know how to use motorways safely.

At the moment, you can only have motorway lessons after you’ve passed your driving test. Some newly-qualified drivers take lessons through the voluntary Pass Plus scheme.

How the change will work

Learner drivers will need to be:

  • accompanied by an approved driving instructor
  • driving a car fitted with dual controls

Any motorways lessons will be voluntary. It will be up to the driving instructor to decide when the learner driver is competent enough for them.

Until the law changes, it’s still illegal for a learner driver to drive on a motorway.

The change only applies to learner drivers of cars. Learner motorcyclists won’t be allowed on motorways.

Trainee driving instructors won’t be allowed to take learner drivers on the motorway.

Motorway driving isn’t being introduced to the driving test as part of this change.

Making sure road users are ready for the change

The change is being well-publicised so that:

  • driving instructors and learner drivers are prepared
  • other road users know what to expect

The Highway Code rules on motorways will be updated.

Driving near learner drivers on the motorway

As with any vehicle on the motorway, keep a safe distance from a learner driver in front of you. Increase the gap on wet or icy roads, or in fog.

You should always be patient with learner drivers. They may not be so skilful at anticipating and responding to events.

Driving instructor vehicles and training

Driving instructors can decide if they want to use a driving school rooftop box during motorway lessons, based on its instructions.

The car will need to display L plates on the front and rear if the rooftop box is removed.

Guidance for driving instructors

 

Learning materials and the syllabus for learning to drive a car are being updated to include motorway lessons.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency won’t give driving instructors extra training on providing motorway lessons.

The driving instructor’s National Associations Strategic Partnership has produced best practice guidance to help instructors.

Preparing drivers for a lifetime of safe driving

The changes are being made to allow learner drivers to:

  • get broader driving experience before taking their driving test
  • get training on how to join and leave the motorway, overtake and use lanes correctly
  • practise driving at higher speeds
  • understand motorway specific traffic signs
  • understand what to do if a vehicle breaks down on a motorway
  • improve their confidence to drive on the motorway unsupervised after passing their driving test
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Safer Cornwall are a working partnership involving: