Safer St Austell acts on concerns raised in Charlestown

February 26th, 2020 by

Safer St Austell has been supporting Charlestown residents who have raised concerns regarding  anti-social behaviour within the village.

Safer St Austell and wider partners from across Cornwall Council have met on several occasions with the Parish Council representatives, local Cornwall Councillor and Keep Charlestown Safe Group, to listen to their concerns and provide action. Issues have been raised about perceived increases in the number of anti-social behaviour incidents and management of some of the licensed premises.

Following an initial meeting a review of incidents and crime types has been conducted by Cornwall Council’s Amethyst Team. The review has found that despite the perceived increase in anti social behaviour, Charlestown remains a low crime area. There has been a 12% reduction in reported Crime in the area (9 crimes), which is a greater reduction than the 3% seen across Cornwall. There has also been a significant reduction (-53%) in the number of reported Anti-Social Behaviour incidents in the area.

Police Inspector Edward Gard said: “I am pleased to see that the number of reported Anti-Social Behaviour incidents have reduced for Charlestown and will continue to review this and act accordingly.

To reassure residents, the Safer St Austell partnership has provided residents with clear information on who to report concerns to and the correct contact numbers, to encourage the reporting of incidents.

Councillor Tom French said: “We understand there have been difficulties with reporting to agencies and we want to make available to the community the many ways residents are able to contact services to report incidents and concerns. Reporting ensures the right agencies are informed and we are getting the correct response needed.

Partnership officers have met with residents to let them know that additional visits have been made by the Police Licensing Officer to all licensed premises across Charlestown to highlight the issues raised and ensure all License Conditions are being met, which has been the case. License Holders have also been asked to make sure that they share information with other licensed premise in the town when an individual is barred, so that any emerging problems are dealt with  promptly and collectively.

The Licensed premises are also supporting each other by providing information on changes they are making to reduce the impact of noise nuisance after their premises close, and bringing forward closing hours where possible. Premises also continue to have CCTV and security staff available where required and attend St Austell Pubwatch, which is a license holders meeting held to encourage sharing of best practice and issues. There has been a Licensing Review conducted by Cornwall Council for one licensed premise requested by the Parish Council which was completed in November.

Rob Nolan, Portfolio Holder for Neighbourhoods said: “It is important that we continue to work together in addressing local concerns and issues. I encourage all residents to report to the correct agency who can investigate and take action appropriately.”

The local Police Neighbourhood Team has also been involved with visits and continue to review any incidents thoroughly. Cornwall Council’s Anti-Social Behaviour Officer (ASB) continues to review ASB incidents and action warnings where evidence is available to enforce.

Simon Mould, Head of Communities Service, Cornwall Council said: “We continue to ensure resident concerns are listened to and acted on, by working together we can have a positive impact on communities and provide reassurance to residents by providing clear reporting routes.

Advice for residents and businesses:

  • Neighbour noise (e.g. loud music, barking dogs) can constitute a statutory nuisance

if this causes an unreasonable interference to the use and enjoyment of your home. Visit www.cornwall.gov.uk/noise for further details, including how to make a complaint to the Cornwall Council’s Community Protection team. Telephone 0300 1234 212 Email publicprotection@cornwall.gov.uk

  • To find out more about alcohol and entertainment licences or report a licensing complaint please visit: Online cornwall.gov.uk Email licensing@cornwall.gov.uk
  • If people experience anti-social behaviour, email 101@dc.police.uk or call 101 for non-emergencies and in an emergency call 999.
  • If you have information about a crime you can also contact Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.
Safer St Austell is affiliated to Safer Cornwall the statutory community safety partnership for Cornwall and provides a local multi-agency co-ordinated response to the issues that are identified by the partnership and the communities of St Austell. The partnership works to reduce and prevent crime, disorder and anti-social behaviour.
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Safer St Austell develops bespoke programme for young people

December 16th, 2019 by

A group of young people from Penrice Academy are celebrating their achievements in completing an innovative course commissioned by Safer St Austell.

 

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Delivering safe spaces and safe workplaces – 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence

December 12th, 2019 by

Safer Cornwall, supported by Safer Futures, promoted the International 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence campaign, by delivering a local workplace focused initiative; encouraging employers and local businesses to provide a safe space in the community for anyone experiencing domestic abuse and sexual violence, in addition to creating a supportive and safe work place for staff.

The initiative was launched on 25th November in Truro Cathedral by Kate Kennally, Jim Pearce (CIOS Police Commander and Safer Cornwall Chair) and Lyn Gooding (CEO, First Light).

Safer Cornwall hosted walkabouts across all of the 10 Safer Towns and asked businesses to pledge their support, by advertising themselves as safe spaces to the public; using posters and merchandise with contact information for Safer Futures and also downloading our new Cornwall Council model DASV Employment Policy Template to provide information, safety and support to their staff.

Overall, the campaign engaged with 188 businesses during the Safer town walkabouts who all signed the pledge to protect customers and staff by providing a Safe Space. Of these businesses 123 have requested further training to develop their skills and knowledge of domestic abuse. The campaign was featured on Heart FM and Liskeard Radio and has had substantial public engagement through the team’s social media coverage which has reached over 41,000 people and the campaign videos have had over 11,000 views.

The campaign has had great support across all partnership agencies and the wider public, and will serve as a great foundation for all future campaigns, including Sexual Abuse and Sexual Violence Awareness Week Monday 3rd February 2020 to Sunday 9th February 2020; watch this space.

 

 

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Festive Alcohol Messaging

December 5th, 2019 by

All this Autumn, Cornwall Public Health, Healthy Cornwall and Cornwall DAAT have been promoting the use of the ‘Drinks Meter’ app through our ‘One Too Many?’ campaign.

This will be promoted again within the 2019 ’What Will Your Drink Cost?’ festive messaging campaign, linking in with the Devon and Cornwall Police drink driving campaign.

In the first part of the campaign we have invited members of the public, especially people who feel that they are ‘normal’ drinkers, to make use of the self-monitoring ‘Drinks Meter’ app. This has been highlighted on our social media feeds, as well as on BBC Radio Cornwall.

As Christmas approaches we are going to use the “What will your drink cost?” campaign to post a series of short videos on social media.

These will focus on trusted groups of people who are involved in the safety and wellbeing of drinkers, such as Paramedics, A&E Nurses and Doctors, Police, and Fire fighters.

These people will bust common drinking myths, such as wrongly feeling that you are safe to drive early the next morning after a late drinking session, that walking home in the dark while drunk is safe, that coffee reduces the harmful impact of alcohol, that painkillers are a good idea when you’ve had lots of alcohol, and that being sick enables you to safely carry on drinking.

These video clips will be posted through December and into the New Year, and will also promote the Drinks Meter. This app which will help people to set themselves limits during the festive season, and to make sure they maintain or return to a sensible pattern in January.

 

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Buy with Confidence is a Trading Standards Approval scheme run nationally by local authorities

October 2nd, 2019 by

The Buy with Confidence Scheme provides people in Cornwall with a list of local businesses which have given their commitment to trading fairly. Every business listed has undergone a series of detailed checks by Trading Standards officers before being approved as a member of the scheme to ensure that they operate in a legal, honest and fair way.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Launceston engagement workshops

July 7th, 2019 by

To gain a local perspective on how effectively partners are tackling key community safety issues on the ground and to discuss areas of concern, Safer Cornwall were invited to host two engagement sessions in Launceston in June – one for young people and one with members of the Launceston Community Network Panel and the wider public.

Community Safety Officer for the area, Lucy Allison, was joined by Safer Cornwall’s Intelligence Manager Erika Sorensen, Community Link Officer Chris Sims and a range of partners including the Police, Anti-Social Behaviour Team, Young People Cornwall, YZUP (young people’s drug and alcohol service), Cornwall Housing, Launceston Youth Project and the Youth Town Council.

The workshops provided an opportunity for partners and local people to talk together about crime and anti-social behaviour and other issues impacting on community safety in Launceston and what Safer Cornwall are already doing through the Partnership Plan. Information gathered in the workshops will be used to improve our understanding of community safety in Cornwall, to identify what more could be done through the Partnership Plan and to understand what additional support might be needed locally.

At the youth workshop young people were asked about their feelings of safety in Launceston.  The majority of young people felt ‘quite safe’ when out in the town during the day, but felt a little less safe after dark because there are less people around and less visibility.  When discussing online safety the young people were very knowledgeable about the risks.

There was an opportunity to talk about crime figures and some of the risks and concerns that might impact on young people, including where to go for more information and help.

We heard that their preferred method of communication is via social media and they were unlikely to read leaflets.  When asked where they would go for help, the majority agreed that they would confide in a trusted adult.  The Safer Cornwall Team and key partners provided useful information on local services that could support the young people in the town.  Overall the young people fed back that events such as this provided them with a voice and they want to be heard!

The second workshop was run with Community Network Panel Members, again to seek their views on community safety issues and how we might tackle them as a partnership.  The workshop was well attended and members fed back valuable local knowledge on the issues that matter to them.

The group discussed local policing, supporting vulnerable people, neighbourhood watch schemes, community cohesion and dealing with adverse social media.  The members identified communication from the Partnership as key to helping people feel informed and connected locally and unlike the young people’s feedback; they preferred a variety of communication methods, including newsletters and parish noticeboards, rather than information being provided only online.

The valuable feedback from both events will now be collated and will help shape the Safer Cornwall Partnership plan for next year.  A big thank you to the young people and community network panel members for their time at the workshop and for an insightful and interesting evening and thanks to The Orchard Centre for hosting the events.

Similar sessions have also been hosted through three of the Safer Towns partnerships – in Penzance, Saltash and Truro.

 

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Newquay Safe issues reminder to parents

July 7th, 2019 by

Newquay Safe is informing parents of young people celebrating the end of their exams that pubs and campsites are not running any under-18s nights in July.

The partnership made up of Cornwall Council, Devon and Cornwall Police and other agencies has been leading on Operation Exodus which is designed to manage the influx of school leavers arriving in Newquay during the first two weeks of July.

This will be the first year that under-18s events are not running and Newquay Safe says it is because fewer young people are having nights out in the town which now has a quieter evening and night-time economy.

Inspector Dave Meredith from Devon and Cornwall Police said: “We recognise that post-GCSE students used to be attracted to the town, so our position has been that we have had to responsibly manage them and ensure their safeguarding is treated as a priority.

“Now however, the partnership and businesses within the town’s night-time economy have recognised this change in customer dynamics and have re-focused their operating practices towards people who are over 18.

“Over the past 10 years Newquay has evolved to be a more family-orientated resort with a reduced emphasis on the night-time economy. This positive evolution has resulted in reduced numbers of young people visiting the town, for example after their GCSE exams.”

Newquay Safe is reminding parents and carers of children planning to visit the town to know where their children are staying and give contact details to accommodation providers in case of emergencies.

The partnership reiterates that underage drinking will not be tolerated.

Rob Nolan, Portfolio Holder for the Environment and Public Protection for Cornwall Council, said: “The partners of Newquay Safe have been working to address concerns to do with young people visiting Newquay following the exam period.

“We encourage accommodation providers to be mindful of their safeguarding responsibilities and support the partnership with raising any concerns.

“Newquay is a family town with outdoor activities, wonderful beaches and green open spaces for all to enjoy.”

Since 2009 the award-winning Newquay Safe Partnership has been helping residents and visitors to the town enjoy the best that Newquay has to offer, by tackling crime, disorder and anti-social behaviour.

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Safer Town Walkabouts

July 7th, 2019 by

Safer Town Walkabouts

Partners from Safer Cornwall and Our Safeguarding Children Partnership are delivering leaflets to retailers in areas across Cornwall in July on the lead up to the school summer holidays as part of the ‘I didn’t know’ campaign about spotting the signs of child exploitation.

We will be providing leaflets, posters and advice about what child exploitation is and how to spot the signs.  We will also outline where people can find advice and support and report any concerns.

Retailers and the service industry are in a unique position to help – evidence shows that public locations can be used as locations to meet, groom and exploit children and young people (both female and male).

Exploited children and young people are almost always too terrified and ashamed to ask for help themselves.  Staff are in a unique position to notice when someone or something seems suspicious, or all may not be right with young customers.  By passing on their concerns to the police, they could potentially save a child from exploitation.  We will provide an update in the next edition of the newsletter.

 

 

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Safer Towns events

March 27th, 2019 by

Across ten Safer Towns in Cornwall residents can find out how community safety is being improved in their area at a series of engagement events run by Safer Cornwall.

In partnership with the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner (OPCC) the events will provide residents with the opportunity to ask their Safer Town partnership team what work is taking place within their town and to raise any concerns or issues they may be experiencing.

The Safer Towns Scheme launched last April and takes a multi-agency approach to tackling community safety issues, to improve feelings of safety and public reassurance, reduce the risk of harm to the community and protect vulnerable groups.

The partnerships work to reduce and prevent crime, disorder and anti-social behaviour. The scheme was rolled out across Camborne and Redruth, Falmouth, Bodmin, Saltash and Liskeard and re-launched in Truro, Newquay, St Austell and Penzance.

The Safer Towns on Tour events are here:

  • Liskeard – Saturday 30th March from 10am-1.30pm, Liskeard Public Hall
  • Falmouth – Tuesday 2nd April from 11:45am, The Moor
  • Penzance – Wednesday 1st May from 11:00 -14.00 at Market Place (adjacent to Lloyd’s Bank)
  • Truro – Saturday 13th April from 9am at Lemon Quay
  • Newquay- Saturday 13th April in the afternoon – time to be confirmed
  • St Austell – Thursday 25th April from 9am at Alymer Square
  • Bodmin – Thursday 25th April from 13.30 – 16.30 at Mount Folly
  • Redruth – Friday 3rd May 09.30am – 12pm Market Strand/Market Place
  • Camborne – Friday 3rd May 13:30 – 16:00 Commercial Square
  • Saltash – Saturday 22nd June all day at Saltash Regatta (Waterfront)

 

 

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‘Peer on peer’ child exploitation highlighted as concern in the South West

March 18th, 2019 by

Children across the south west are victims of sexual exploitation.  But while media reports often highlight cases of adult grooming and child abuse, Devon and Cornwall Police say the most likely form of child sexual exploitation (CSE) in the south west is perpetrated by other young people.

It’s sometimes referred to as ‘peer on peer’ exploitation, and its victims are young males and young females.

“People may be unaware that CSE can be perpetrated by young people aged 18 or younger, and they themselves may also have been victims of CSE,” says Detective Chief Inspector Alison Lander, Devon & Cornwall Police and Force lead for CSE.

Recent research led by Plymouth’s Safeguarding Children’s Board found little awareness and understanding among young people of peer on peer sexual exploitation.

Their research showed that this form of exploitation in particular was not widely recognised or understood as a crime, which is preventing children from reporting it.

They found that young people are also not reporting sexual exploitation because they worry that doing so would lose them friendships; they’re concerned about how their parents might react; or that they’ll be seen as wasting police time.

Monday 18 March is a national awareness day for highlighting CSE.  Authorities across the South West are using the day to say to children and young people, “If you are put in a situation where you feel pressured sexually, please report it.  It’s OK to tell someone.”

Lisa, (not her real name).

Lisa is 15 years old and lives with her mother.  She began to go missing, leaving the house during the middle of the night to meet peers, and there were concerns about her drinking alcohol during while out.

Her behaviour in school and at home deteriorated with no clear reason.   Her mum found information on Lisa’s phone, indicating that she had become sexually active,  and having unprotected sex.

Lisa said that she’d exchanged indecent images of herself with some of boys at her school.

On occasions that she went missing, Lisa was drinking alcohol and smoking cannabis with her male friends.  She’d had sex with one of the boys while under the influence, and he’d told his friends about it.

Lisa started getting messages from other boys asking her to send pictures of herself in her underwear.  Lisa felt uncomfortable, but said ‘everyone sends nudes’.  And besides, she felt it was nice to have boys be interested in her in that way.

One boy said that he could get some cannabis, and he offered some to Lisa in exchange for sex.  She’s thought he was joking, but the boy repeated it a few times and on a later occasion with him, she went along with what he asked.

Regional Head of Service for the NSPCC, Sharon Copsey, says:  “Having early conversations about healthy relationships and consent is vital to tackling child sexual exploitation before it starts. We know that young people don’t always understand that what’s happening to them is abuse.”

Detective Chief Inspector Alison Lander, said: “Many young people who are being exploited do not realise they are at risk and will not ask for help.  Some may see themselves as willing participants in such abuse, not realising that what is happening to them is illegal.  It’s a difficult message to convey to young people, but it’s really important that they are aware of risk and how to avoid it.  Crucially they need to know how to report it, and to have confidence to do so.

“The public can really help us detect and prevent CSE among young people by knowing the signs and reporting any concerns they have.

“It’s not just parents, or teachers and carers who can help spot the signs of CSE.  Anyone working in a service industry, such as taxi drivers and hotel workers, shop keepers; anyone who may be able to spot vulnerable young people who may be at risk of exploitation or in an exploitative relationship – can also help to spot the signs and to report any concerns.”

Andy Bickley, Independent Chair of Plymouth Safeguarding Children’s Board, said: “We are committed to working with local organisations to tackle child sexual abuse and exploitation and CSE Day is the ideal opportunity to help improve awareness.

“This latest research shows that it isn’t just adults that exploit children and young people, it can also be their peers, so it’s really important that we make sure our young people know what the dangers are, and also what support is available.”

Schools across the South West and services that work with young people are actively raising awareness of CSE among young people.  Parents and guardians are being encouraged to do the same at home.

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