HOT at RCHT

June 6th, 2019 by

Innovative ‘HOT Team’ project to address alcohol A&E figures

In April 2018, national figures demonstrated that the number of people being admitted to A&E departments in England is the highest since records began.  Additional research has evidenced that a substantial amount of individuals frequently attending A&E departments are struggling with problematic drug and alcohol use.

Addaction, Cornwall’s commissioned drug and alcohol treatment service, has launched a rapid response team to cut the number of people frequently attending the hospital’s A&E department due to alcohol or drugs.

The HOT Team (Hospital Outreach Team) is the first team in the country to link up with a major Hospital to deliver a collaborative service offer to patients struggling with problematic alcohol and/or drug use, often becoming frequent attenders.

Addaction’s HOT team and RCHT was recently featured on ITV West Country News and the project is clearly thriving; with RCHT reporting a dramatic reduction in frequent attender numbers. The report was overwhelmingly positive and reflected the dynamic and innovative work being done in Cornwall to address the needs of some of our most vulnerable community members.

As a result of the HOT team’s success in Cornwall, the Government is now evaluating the project and considering delivering it across the country’s 50 major hospitals. This project is a great example of the collaborative work between the Commissioning team and Addaction, who continue to support a multi-agency response and service offer to individuals struggling with various vulnerabilities, including drug and alcohol related harm.

Author: Anna MacGregor

 

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Inspiring frontline practitioners

June 5th, 2019 by

Inspiring frontline practitioners and their managers about working differently with people who self-neglect – Safeguarding Adults Board conference May 23rd 2019

Focussing on Self Neglect, this year’s Safeguarding Adults Board Conference brought together 120 multi-agency frontline practitioners and their managers to hear from nationally recognised sector leads and be inspired by organisations who work differently, to celebrate some great work already happening in Cornwall and to learn together about what we can do differently in future.

SAB Chair, Fiona Field, opened the day with a poignant video ‘Keith’s Story’ the real life journey of a person affected by hoarding.

 

Delegates then attended workshops lead by renowned experts in their field; Clouds End, Research in Practice for Adults, Community Fire and Rescue Service and Ardent Care.

Helen Charlesworth-May, Strategic Director Adult Social Care and Health, closed the morning session by acknowledging the way we worked with people historically is not the way we will work with people in future.

Professor Michael Preston-Shoot, Emeritus Professor of Social Worker, University of Bedfordshire,  delivered a thought provoking speech asking  delegates to look closely at the ‘masks’ we wear and to consider this in our work with people who self-neglect and hoard.  Dr Mary Rose Day, Independent Nurse Consultant, shared  the assessment tools she uses.

Other speeches included Lloyd Ncube of Ardent Care and a good news case story presented by  Angela King, Head of Service and Lin Cousin, Case Co-coordinator, Adult Social Care.  A short film of the day will be available soon on the SAB website.

 

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1521 staff trained

June 2nd, 2019 by

Community Safety & DAAT Training Programme 2018/19 End of Year Report

This report covers the 12 month period April 2018 – March 2019, during which time the following training courses have been delivered:
  • 18x Alcohol Intervention & Brief Advice

A total of 317 people attended and completed the 3 hour Alcohol IBA session in 2018/19.

In additional to this, there was 3 Alcohol IBA Health Check sessions run for specific teams which were attended and completed by another 24 people, making a total of 341 people in year.

  • 11x Basic Drug Awareness PLUS 1 Train the Trainer session 

A total of 222 people attended and completed the 1 day BDA course in 2018/19.

  • Train the Trainer – 1 day course – (Trainer: Kim Hager)

Developing the bank of trainers who can deliver our local course. Following the Basic Drug Awareness Train the Trainer session on 26th November 2018 we have an additional 6 trainers for this course.  All 6 trainee trainers were assigned to future BDA course dates to train alongside the existing trainers.  This has been attended by 4 trainees so far with plans to co-train again in future courses to build experience.

  • 2x Blue Light course 

A total of 36 people attended and completed the 1 day Blue Light course in 2018/19.

The Blue Light Project is Alcohol Concern’s national initiative to develop alternative approaches and care pathways for people who are dependent drinkers, who resist change and are a high users of public services.

  • 14x Community Hospital Alcohol Detoxification (CHAD) training 

Between March 2018 and November 2018 work was carried out to identify and upskill Lead nurses within CFT to provide in-service leadership, training and development on the delivery of CHAD.

An initial Train the Trainer session was delivered on 30th January 2019 led by Angela Andrews.  Since then the above courses have been delivered by CFT nurses with DAAT and GP support.

A total of 106 people have attended and completed the CHAD training session in 2018/19 (this course is delivered annually for nursing competencies).

In addition, 2 Home Alcohol Detox training sessions have been delivered across 5 pharmacies, to enable them to support home detoxification from alcohol.

  • 4x Connect 5 Stage 1 Mental Wellbeing training 

Connect 5 is an evidence based collaborative prevention toolkit that promotes psychological knowledge, understanding and awareness and development of skills which empower people to take proactive steps to build resilience and look after themselves.

A total of 59 people attended and completed a Stage 1 Connect 5 course.  The subsequent Stage 2 and 3 will follow in 2019/20 programme.

  • 11x Dual Diagnosis courses 

This course is run specifically for mental health services and drug & alcohol service staff.  A total of 174 people attended and completed the 2 day Dual Diagnosis course in 2018/19.

Due to a number of requests and feedback we are looking to open the availability of this course to the wider training circulation in the 2019/20 programme.

  • 5x Mental Health First Aid courses 

A total of 76 people attended and completed the 2 day accredited Mental Health First Aid course in 2018/19.

No courses were delivered in Q4, due to the external accredited trainer moving out of county.  We are currently in the process of locating another trainer.

  • 10x Motivational Interviewing (general) 

A total of 195 people attended and completed the 1 day general MI course in 2018/19.

The DAAT have now brought the delivery of Motivational Interviewing course in-house, so we no longer require an external trainer to deliver.  Since October 2018, J

  • 7x Routine Enquiry into Adverse Childhood Experiences

A total of 137 people attended and completed the 1 day REACh training in 2018/19 (this course was introduced in Q3 of the programme).

The services that have attended and completed the REACh training in 2018/19 are DASV service staff, First Episode Psychosis Team, Young People Cornwall, Penhaligon Friends, Intercom Trust, Bosence Farm and Boswyns (including the YP Unit).

We will be organising an extra session for Young People Cornwall in June/July 2019 due to the number of staff still requiring the training.

  • 3x Time Credits and Supporting Asset Based Training 

Tempo Ltd are commissioned by DAAT to embed Time Credits into complex needs services (recovery, homelessness and Domestic Abuse) throughout the Area.  This training gives management and delivery staff an understanding of what to expect and how to utilise the currency in order to drive impact within client support planning in an asset-based approach.

A total of 42 people attended and completed the 3 hour Time Credits session in 2018/19 (this course was introduced in Q2 of the programme).

  • 11x Young People’s Substance Awareness and Screening 

A total of 133 people attended and completed the 1 day YP Screening course in 2018/19.

 

This is a total of 1521 staff in Cornwall in 2018/19.

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‘Peer on peer’ child exploitation highlighted as concern in the South West

March 18th, 2019 by

Children across the south west are victims of sexual exploitation.  But while media reports often highlight cases of adult grooming and child abuse, Devon and Cornwall Police say the most likely form of child sexual exploitation (CSE) in the south west is perpetrated by other young people.

It’s sometimes referred to as ‘peer on peer’ exploitation, and its victims are young males and young females.

“People may be unaware that CSE can be perpetrated by young people aged 18 or younger, and they themselves may also have been victims of CSE,” says Detective Chief Inspector Alison Lander, Devon & Cornwall Police and Force lead for CSE.

Recent research led by Plymouth’s Safeguarding Children’s Board found little awareness and understanding among young people of peer on peer sexual exploitation.

Their research showed that this form of exploitation in particular was not widely recognised or understood as a crime, which is preventing children from reporting it.

They found that young people are also not reporting sexual exploitation because they worry that doing so would lose them friendships; they’re concerned about how their parents might react; or that they’ll be seen as wasting police time.

Monday 18 March is a national awareness day for highlighting CSE.  Authorities across the South West are using the day to say to children and young people, “If you are put in a situation where you feel pressured sexually, please report it.  It’s OK to tell someone.”

Lisa, (not her real name).

Lisa is 15 years old and lives with her mother.  She began to go missing, leaving the house during the middle of the night to meet peers, and there were concerns about her drinking alcohol during while out.

Her behaviour in school and at home deteriorated with no clear reason.   Her mum found information on Lisa’s phone, indicating that she had become sexually active,  and having unprotected sex.

Lisa said that she’d exchanged indecent images of herself with some of boys at her school.

On occasions that she went missing, Lisa was drinking alcohol and smoking cannabis with her male friends.  She’d had sex with one of the boys while under the influence, and he’d told his friends about it.

Lisa started getting messages from other boys asking her to send pictures of herself in her underwear.  Lisa felt uncomfortable, but said ‘everyone sends nudes’.  And besides, she felt it was nice to have boys be interested in her in that way.

One boy said that he could get some cannabis, and he offered some to Lisa in exchange for sex.  She’s thought he was joking, but the boy repeated it a few times and on a later occasion with him, she went along with what he asked.

Regional Head of Service for the NSPCC, Sharon Copsey, says:  “Having early conversations about healthy relationships and consent is vital to tackling child sexual exploitation before it starts. We know that young people don’t always understand that what’s happening to them is abuse.”

Detective Chief Inspector Alison Lander, said: “Many young people who are being exploited do not realise they are at risk and will not ask for help.  Some may see themselves as willing participants in such abuse, not realising that what is happening to them is illegal.  It’s a difficult message to convey to young people, but it’s really important that they are aware of risk and how to avoid it.  Crucially they need to know how to report it, and to have confidence to do so.

“The public can really help us detect and prevent CSE among young people by knowing the signs and reporting any concerns they have.

“It’s not just parents, or teachers and carers who can help spot the signs of CSE.  Anyone working in a service industry, such as taxi drivers and hotel workers, shop keepers; anyone who may be able to spot vulnerable young people who may be at risk of exploitation or in an exploitative relationship – can also help to spot the signs and to report any concerns.”

Andy Bickley, Independent Chair of Plymouth Safeguarding Children’s Board, said: “We are committed to working with local organisations to tackle child sexual abuse and exploitation and CSE Day is the ideal opportunity to help improve awareness.

“This latest research shows that it isn’t just adults that exploit children and young people, it can also be their peers, so it’s really important that we make sure our young people know what the dangers are, and also what support is available.”

Schools across the South West and services that work with young people are actively raising awareness of CSE among young people.  Parents and guardians are being encouraged to do the same at home.

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National Child Sexual Exploitation Awareness Day 18th March 2019

March 8th, 2019 by

Safeguarding children and young people to the age of 25 from sexual AND criminal exploitation is a key priority for Safer Cornwall, the Safeguarding Children Partnership, and Safeguarding Adults Board.

Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) is a form of sexual abuse that involves the manipulation and/or coercion of young people into sexual activity – March 18 2019, is National Child Sexual Exploitation Awareness Day which aims to highlight the issues surrounding Child Sexual Exploitation and encourage everyone to think, spot and speak out against abuse – we are also widening the scope to think about criminal exploitation, county lines, trafficking and modern slavery.

We want to raise awareness of child exploitation: knowing the signs, how to report it, and where to get help.

We will be part of a social media campaign in the days leading up to and including the 18th March 2019 – you can sign up to the National Working Group on Twitter https://twitter.com/NatWorGroup or Facebook https://en-gb.facebook.com/TheNWGNetwork/ or visit their website http://www.stop-cse.org/ and look out for our local social media campaign!

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Carbon monoxide detectors supplied by Wales and West Utilities

March 7th, 2019 by

Cornwall Fire and Rescue Community Safety Service (CFRCCS) has created a new partnership with Wales and West Utilities (WWU). WWU are the gas emergency and pipeline service that covers Wales and south west England and as part of their social obligation have joined with CFRCCS to help make Cornwall Safer.

As part of this new partnership, WWU have supplied CFRCSS with a number of Carbon Monoxide Detectors for staff to fit, in accordance with WWU criteria, when carrying out Home Fire Safety Checks (HFSC’s) or Living Safe and Well Visits (LSWV).

 

 

 

WWU criteria outlines that the free CO detectors will be available to people living with:

  • A serious health condition,
  • Mobility issues,
  • Living in a cold home,
  • Fuel poverty
  • Evidence of damp and condensation

When a Co detector is fitted in a home, a WWU Customer Survey form will be completed by the resident and the forms will then be returned to WWU to allow them to evaluate the effectiveness of the partnership in a bid to secure future free CO detectors for those people most in need in Cornwall.

For further information regarding this new partnership please contact Watch Manager Mark Grenfell: Mark.Grenfell@fire.cornwall.gov.uk

 

 

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Safer Cornwall Training Programme 2019-20

March 6th, 2019 by

Accessible training to help identify risk, reduce harm and support people in the process of change.

The DAAT offers a range of training opportunities to improve knowledge, skills, awareness and joint working across a range of areas, particularly mental health. The courses are available to internal and external staff and run throughout the year.

 

 

We offer the following courses:

  • Alcohol Identification and Brief Advice
  • Basic Drug Awareness
  • Connect 5 Mental Wellbeing Stage 1
  • Dual Diagnosis
  • Mental Health First Aid
  • Motivational Interviewing
  • Time Credits and Supporting Asset Based Working
  • Young People’s Substance Awareness & Screening

For more information please visit our page here

Email: DAATevents@cornwall.gov.uk

Telephone: 01726 223400

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Cornwall Licensing Policy update

February 6th, 2019 by

On January 22nd, after being proposed by the Cornwall Licensing Act Committee, Cornwall Council voted in an updated Alcohol Licensing Policy Statement. This will now be in place for the next 5 years, setting the tone for how alcohol should be sold in Cornwall.

This new policy, which can be seen in full here, embeds some important work that has been undertaken by Cornwall’s Public Health and Community Safety teams in the last 3 years.

Local Authority Public Health Departments have been a Licensing Responsible Authority since 2012, but nationally had relatively little input into Licensing cases and culture.

This gap was addressed by Public Health England (PHE) in the initial Local Alcohol Action Areas and then in their ‘Health as a Licensing Objective’ (HaLO) pilot schemes.

Cornwall was invited by PHE to participate in the 2016-17 HaLO pilot scheme, and we created a postcode responsive tool that can help to quickly assess the alcohol related risks in any given area.

 

This HaLO tool, now renamed the ‘Health Impact Licensing Tool’ (HILT) has been seen as a national example of good practice, used in PHE webinars, presented to the Local Government Association and the House of Lords Licensing Committee, and to the academic ‘United Kingdom Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies’ (UKCTAS).

The HILT tool has been used operationally to evaluate Cornwall’s Cumulative Impact Zones, and to contribute contextual evidence to a License revocation case against a premises in a violent hotspot within a Cumulative Impact Zone.

After a draft and consultation led by Julie Flower of CC Licensing team, the new Cornwall 5 year Licensing Policy Statement was voted through unopposed by full Council yesterday 22/01/19.

 

From a Public Health and Community Safety perspective, this policy:

  1. Embeds work done in the last 3 years,
  2. Puts these achievements into written policy, and
  3. Makes them a standard part of Cornwall Licensing policy and culture for the next 5 years.

This includes:

  • Public Health as a standard aspect of Licensing and alcohol retail (p6-7);
  • National guidance on responsible drinking, which can then be used to critique irresponsible drink promotions (p7);
  • The 10 Safer Towns initiative to address wider issues (p10);
  • ‘What Will Your Drink Cost?’ as an ongoing available flexible targeted messaging brand and campaign (p10);
  • Cumulative Impact Policies and mapping (p11 and 47);
  • The protection of children from harm (p21 and 66);
  • Public Health as a Responsible Authority (p49-51), including:
    • Alcohol Related Hospital Admissions;
    • The impact of alcohol in Cornwall;
    • HILT – The ‘Health Impact Licensing Tool’;
    • ARID – The ‘Assault Related Injuries Database’; and
    • Alcohol retail quality standards.
  • Drugs policies (p59-60), and
  • The responsibility of premises to have a supply of ‘spikies’ to raise awareness and keep customers safe (p65).

This now normalises pilot work that has been undertaken by the DAAT, Public Health, Safer Cornwall and Amethyst Community Safety Intelligence, allowing it to have long term application and impact in Licensing and Alcohol retail in Cornwall.

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Cornwall’s 2018 festive alcohol safety messaging …

February 6th, 2019 by

Over Christmas and New Year, a series of alcohol responsibility messages went out under the hashtags #CornwallChristmas and #CornwallPartyTime

These were all based on messages in the campaign webpage “Party Time”.

The themes covered were the lack of a December Drinking Superpower, having a Safe Night Out, Drink Driving facts, precautions against spiking for customers and Bars, walking away from trouble rather than becoming an imaginary drunk UN, all promoted under the long running Safer Cornwall message of ‘What Will Your Drink Cost?’


The messages were picked up on the Alcohol Strategy Facebook and Twitter feeds, as well as the Cornwall Council and Public Health social media.

The most widely read posts were this drink driving Facebook message, this ‘Walk Away‘ Twitter post, and this Spiking message.

The spiking messages also picked up a lot of views on the Cornwall Council Social Media.

Overall, the messages reached a total of about 40,000 hits, highlighted the issues people are most concerned about, and have given us pointers for this year’s messages.

 

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Alcohol Pathways – Visit from Central Government 16th January

January 28th, 2019 by

James McGowan, Government Policy Advisor and Glasha Frank, Department of Health, Patient Flow and Access Team, who are developing national alcohol pathways came to see the work in Cornwall, which has been commended to them, and to meet the teams and commissioner responsible.The external team met with Liz Farrington, Consultant Nurse Hepatology, alongside representatives from the Alcohol Liaison Team, Addaction Hospital Outreach Team, Safeguarding leads and patients. The visit was co-ordinated by Kim Hager, Joint Commissioning Manager from the Drug and Alcohol Action Team.

Glasha Frank ‘Thanks for the thought and effort‎ that went into today. It was invaluable being able to hear and appreciate what goes into making a local initiative work, and the range of people we were able to speak to made it quite an insightful visit. Its given me quite a bit of food for thought and accounts to draw on to help build up the wider work around frequent attenders.

Hearing from ‘Patient x’ was particularly memorable.

James Magowan wrote:  ‘A massive thanks for all your time and input today, a really beneficial visit. Thanks too to Jez for the taxi work back and forth to the station! Please pass on thanks also to the Addaction team and others at the hospital for their time and input.

A fantastic opportunity to see the impact that Life Chances Fund money, alongside your own, is having for vulnerable people. I was particularly struck by the journey  the patient we met  outlined and really pleased that she will shortly be 1 year without drinking. I appreciate her journey pre-dates LCF, but it was clear from the various calls Lee needed to take that, unfortunately, there are many others who are in the position she had found herself. Please ask Addaction folk to pass on thanks to her for time and willingness to share.

Liz Farrington, who leads the hospital alcohol liaison team, said “This was a fantastic opportunity to showcase true multi-agency working from acute care through to the community. We have developed significant partnerships, with particular emphasis on frequent attenders and those with co-existing drug or mental health problems, and complex physical needs such as decompensated cirrhosis and alcohol related brain injury. Whilst we still have gaps in some services we are all committed to reducing unwarranted variation in this group of patients, in line with the NHS long term plan”.

The visit was based upon the national recognition of the creative work that is being developed and delivered by partners in Cornwall, reflecting everyone’s determination. It has also given us the opportunity to highlight areas which continue to prove challenging and would benefit from multi department guidance.

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Safer Cornwall are a working partnership involving: