National Child Exploitation Awareness Day 18th March 2020

March 5th, 2020 by

Tackling exploitation is a high priority for partners in Cornwall. Exploitation is where someone takes unfair advantage of others to gain something for themselves. It occurs when a person is persuaded to do things in exchange for something that they need or want (coercion), or threatened or forced to do things by people with more power than them – this can be someone of a similar age to the child or young adult being exploited, as well as an adult.  It can include being made to provide sexual acts (sexual exploitation) and/or to commit crimes such as theft, benefit fraud, or dealing, carrying or growing drugs (known as criminal exploitation).

Commonly children and young adults think that they have a free choice in their involvement, but when the people exploiting them have more power than they do, we do not believe that this is a free choice.   The methods the exploiters use include ‘grooming’ where someone builds a relationship, trust and emotional connection with a person so that they can exploit them; coercion; control; manipulation and threats.  Children and young adults can also be experiencing exploitation and taking part in abusive behaviours towards others at the same time – exploitation is never the victim’s fault.

Our new Child Exploitation Strategy for the next 3 years (which covers ages up to 25 years) is being published in April 2020 and we are also supporting the National Child Exploitation Awareness Day on 18th March 2020 which aims to highlight the issues surrounding Child Exploitation; encouraging everyone to think, spot and speak out.

Look out for our social media campaign – one of the ways you can show your support to the awareness day is to write a personal pledge on your hands and post your photo on social media with the hashtag  #CEADay20 to help us raise awareness of child exploitation.

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Raising Awareness on Sexual Abuse and Sexual Violence 2020

February 28th, 2020 by

Safer Cornwall supported Sexual Abuse Sexual Violence Awareness WK 2020 with a conference focusing on the impact of SASV on Children and Young People and a substantial social media campaign promoting the #ItsNotOK movement.

The conference was sold out, with 150 attendees from Health, Education, Local Authority and Voluntary sectors and received great feedback:

“Thank you for a fab morning”
“Thank you for an informative and emotive conference”
“Great conference, great awareness shared”
“I enjoyed the whole conference and have gained a wealth of knowledge that I can use in my role and share with my colleagues”
“hard hitting and informative about the stance and position the Police are taking to address this issue.”

In addition to the conference, we also delivered a substantial social media campaign, featuring information in relation to sexual violence and sexual abuse  and its impact on young people and children and guidance on how to access support in Cios.

The campaign was very successful, reaching over 20,000 people, featuring videos with content from multiple partner agencies and professionals bravely sharing their personal experience of sexual violence and sexual abuse to raise awareness and break the silence!

 

 

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RECONNECT at Westminster

February 28th, 2020 by

Barnardo’s have been working on a Domestic Abuse report based on evidence from their services about the impact domestic abuse has on children – particularly developing mental health issues, harmful sexual behaviour, being in an abusive intimate relationships, and youth offending.

RECONNECT, one of the programmes commissioned through Safer Cornwall, played a vital role in contributing to the report and ensured the voices of the children and young people who live in Cornwall were heard.  They have long been calling for the Domestic Abuse Bill to fully reflect children’s experience of domestic abuse and their vital need for support and Barnardo’s report supports these calls.

Staff from Barnardo’s launched the report at a parliamentary roundtable on Tuesday 25th February in the House of Lords.  They discussed the findings and the upcoming opportunity the Domestic Abuse Bill provides to improve support for children affected by domestic abuse.

Sarah Milnes from Barnardo’s said: “There were some real strengths at the meeting, including the content of the speeches and the diversity of people in the room – representing government, parliament and the voluntary sector. There was also significant praise for Barnardo’s which is a tribute to the quality of the report and the influencing we’ve been doing in recent months.”

 

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What will your drink cost this Christmas

December 16th, 2019 by

Who will you spend Christmas with? A Paramedic, a Firefighter or even a Police Officer?

This festive season, as many of us drink more than intended, and we’re urging you to think about how and who you could spend Christmas with.

The Safer Cornwall partnership festive safe drinking campaign “What Will Your Drink Cost?” is asking anyone out enjoying festivities over the coming weeks to drink sensibly while enjoying Cornwall and Christmas.

The campaign not only ask you to think how your evening might end and what the impact could be, but also how to drink sensibly busting some common drinking myths!

Raph is a specialist paramedic who explains why sticking to one type of alcohol doesn’t mean you can drink more.

Other myths include:

  • Having a tactical chunder doesn’t get rid of the effects of alcohol – as the alcohol will already be absorbed into your blood, and you could end up very drunk and needing to go to hopsital
  • Drinking coffee doesn’t sober you up, and it’s not a way to help you drive home. The coffee just masks the effect by making you feel less tired
  • Having a large meal before you go out doesn’t give you the ability to drink more, it just makes the alcohol hang around longer in your system and you could end up drinking too much and getting yourself more drunk
  • If you’ve had more than a couple the night before, you won’t be okay to drive the next morning, as it could take over 12 hours for the alcohol to leave your body and be safe to drive. You could end up losing your licence
  • Taking paracetamol before bed doesn’t help your hangover, it’s really bad for your kidneys and the effect wears off while you’re asleep. You’re better off taking them in the morning when you wake up.

Drinking too much can impact on our already stretched services such as the NHS and Police force. Those services will be more than happy to help if you really need it, but they don’t really want to spend time with you because you’ve had too much to drink.

Drinking more than normal can bring on a false sense of confidence. This can lead to bad choices or decisions, such as drink driving or getting into arguments and fights. In a few cases, this can lead to people ending up in hospital, losing their drivers licence, getting fined, being arrested, or having accidents which put themselves or other people in danger.

The Council and its partners hope everyone enjoys the festive season, go out and have fun but please drink sensibly, and to plan how you’ll get home safely.

We don’t want to be the Christmas Grinch and say that you shouldn’t drink at all, because we know that for most of us that’s not going to happen! What we’re asking is that people go out and have fun in a way that doesn’t impact on others, or potentially affect their own future.

Here’s Jez Bayes, our Alcohol Strategy Lead giving us some top tips to enjoy Cornwall and drink sensibly this festive season:

  • Alternate alcoholic drinks with soft drinks or water
  • Keep an eye on your drink when out, and don’t get to the point where you wouldn’t notice if someone spiked you
  • Plan how you will get home – book a taxi in advance, organise a lift, or have a designated driver in your group
  • Don’t attempt to reason with people who have drunk too much

 

 

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Santa’s top safety tips

December 16th, 2019 by

OPSS has partnered with Santa, Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents, Chartered Trading Standards Institute, Netmums, and the Child Accident Prevention Trust to warn against second rate toys.

We have produced 12 safety tips for people to use when buying for children:

  1. Look for the CE symbol: This means the manufacturer has assessed the toy for safety. Find the symbol on the label or box.
  2. Check it’s for kids: Festive novelties can look like toys. Keep them away from kids.
  3. Reputation matters: Check the suppliers who have a good reputation for safe and reliable toys. They’ll have good safety standards and refund policies.
  4. Button battery safety: Christmas toys may have button batteries – which can prove lethal if ingested. Check they are screwed in safely before giving to a child.
  5. Check age restrictions: Toys must be clearly marked with age restrictions, which assess risks such as choking hazards. Always follow the age recommendations.
  6. Consider special needs: Remember that children with special needs might be more vulnerable, and make sure to shop accordingly.
  7. Choking hazards: Avoid toys with small parts or loose fabric – they can be a choking hazard.
  8. Loose parts: Loose ribbons on toys and costumes can be dangerous. Think before you buy.
  9. Inspect toy boxes: Wear and tear can make a toy unsafe. Check your children’s toys and get them repaired if necessary.
  10. Supervise when you need to: Some toys need an adult on hand during playtime. Read all the instructions so you can keep things under control.
  11. Tidy up: Boxes, plastic bags and wire can be a hazard. Clear away all packaging once everything’s unwrapped.
  12. Celebrate a safe Christmas: Completing these checks can save you a lot of stress later. Remember to get batteries (and dispose of these safely too)!

 

#santasafety

 

 

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Special Recognition for Coastline Housing and the DAAT

December 9th, 2019 by

Coastline Housing and Drug and Alcohol Action Team (DAAT) staff attended the Markel 3rd Sector Awards on Friday 6th December in relation to their work with Naloxone.

Coastline Housing have been working on the Naloxone initiative with Cornwall and Isles of Scilly DAAT since 2015. Provision of Naloxone is an evidence-based intervention that can save lives by blocking or reversing the effects of a Heroin or opioid overdose, and Coastline Housing have been working with the DAAT to incorporate it into their services.

Coastline Housing were nominated for the Collaboration (Integration) Award which recognises ways of working in partnership with other organisations or services, achieving outcomes that would otherwise not have been achieved, and they were finalists in 4 categories:

  • Lynsey Johns, a Leadership Award for her outstanding leadership across supported accommodation, which has positively affected the quality of care;
  • Derek Law, for Making a Difference, where  significant changes have been made that have positively impacted on outcomes for people using their services;
  • Lynsey Johns, Amanda Addo,  Lee Newnham and Zena Mower Bryant  an Innovative Quality Outcomes Award, recognising their work and that of their teams around Trauma Informed Care (TIC) and the creation of psychologically Informed Environments (PIE) where people using their services feel physically and psychologically safe;
  • Jo Cowling and the DAAT for the collaborative work around Naloxone.

The judges also gave special recognition to the work of Coastline colleagues who have impressively trained over 400 people and saved 26 lives using Naloxone to reverse the effects of opiate overdoses.  This very significant work keeps people alive until they can access further treatment and social support enabling them to move forwards positively in their lives.

Marion Barton of the DAAT: “It is such a privilege to be part of this vital work, to work alongside such outstanding and dedicated colleagues and to enjoy this special occasion where their work is nationally recognised. Thank you to Allister Young, Louise Beard and all managers and staff at Coastline, Addaction colleagues and also my manager, Kim Hager for supporting the continuation of such amazing work with Naloxone.”

 

 

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Festive Alcohol Messaging

December 5th, 2019 by

All this Autumn, Cornwall Public Health, Healthy Cornwall and Cornwall DAAT have been promoting the use of the ‘Drinks Meter’ app through our ‘One Too Many?’ campaign.

This will be promoted again within the 2019 ’What Will Your Drink Cost?’ festive messaging campaign, linking in with the Devon and Cornwall Police drink driving campaign.

In the first part of the campaign we have invited members of the public, especially people who feel that they are ‘normal’ drinkers, to make use of the self-monitoring ‘Drinks Meter’ app. This has been highlighted on our social media feeds, as well as on BBC Radio Cornwall.

As Christmas approaches we are going to use the “What will your drink cost?” campaign to post a series of short videos on social media.

These will focus on trusted groups of people who are involved in the safety and wellbeing of drinkers, such as Paramedics, A&E Nurses and Doctors, Police, and Fire fighters.

These people will bust common drinking myths, such as wrongly feeling that you are safe to drive early the next morning after a late drinking session, that walking home in the dark while drunk is safe, that coffee reduces the harmful impact of alcohol, that painkillers are a good idea when you’ve had lots of alcohol, and that being sick enables you to safely carry on drinking.

These video clips will be posted through December and into the New Year, and will also promote the Drinks Meter. This app which will help people to set themselves limits during the festive season, and to make sure they maintain or return to a sensible pattern in January.

 

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Cornwall Council recently launched their Casualty Reduction Strategy

November 1st, 2019 by

Cornwall Council recently launched their Casualty Reduction Strategy, which was previously published in 2013.  Our priority remains to reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured (KSIs) on our roads and action is required now to reverse the negative trend of rising KSIs, particularly with those seriously injured.

Our vision is to eradicate deaths and serious injuries from our roads, supporting an accessible, healthier and safer Cornwall.  We have adopted the ‘Safe System’ approach, which advocates a multi-disciplinary and multi-sectoral approach to address the road safety needs of all users, using the five pillar framework approach of Safer Speeds, Safer Road Users, Safer Vehicles, Safer Roads and Mobility and Post Crash Response.  Underpinning this is Cornwall Council’s collaborative principles to:

  • work together as one team
  • connect with our partners
  • connect with our communities and;
  • tackle KSI’s with evidence led data

 

Road safety is a matter of national importance, affecting both those who drive and those who don’t drive.  September 26th was a day of reflection and a pledge by Project EDWARD to encourage a European Day Without a Road Death.  This annual event promotes initiatives to encourage all road users to reflect on their behaviour and attitude, as they recognise driver behaviour is one of the key barriers to progress.  During the week commencing 18th November 2019, the charity Brake are running a Road Safety week which we will see activity focussed on safe and healthy journeys, encouraging everyone to step up and play their part in the celebration of safe system solutions and the creation of a safe and healthy future.

As part of the Road Safety Week, Brake is encouraging everyone to ‘Make the Brake Pledge’.  The Pledge calls for people to do everything they can to protect themselves and the people around them.  For more information on how to pledge see the following link:

http://www.brake.org.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&layout=edit&id=129

Casualty Reduction Strategy is available here: https://www.cornwall.gov.uk/media/41393044/road-casualty-reduction-strategy-2019-web.pdf

 

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Multi-agency working to combat drug litter

October 16th, 2019 by

Community Safety Drug Litter ½ Year Report 2019/20

Outreach workers from Addaction and the Local Police Teams attend sites of reported drug litter to provide assertive outreach to those affected.

Members of the public are asked to report drug litter to Cornwall Council and once received this information is cascaded to Addaction and the local Police so they can attend the affected area and offer support and advice to anyone who may need it.

Over the last 6 months there have been 72 reports of drug litter to Cornwall Council and the most prevalent areas are Newquay (15), Penzance (15), St Austell (9) and Camborne (7).

Graph shows litter request for April to September 2018 compared to the same time period in 2019.

There has been a reduction in the number of drug litter requests in Penzance and St Austell. The reason for this reduction is unknown although one possible explanation is the extra time and resources dedicated to assertive outreach in these areas.

Below is a breakdown of the drug litter requests for the last 6 months for further information.

 

 

 

 

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Community Safety & DAAT Training Programmes

October 3rd, 2019 by

Between the months of April and September, the following training courses have been delivered for Community Safety & Fire staff and services, including Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence, Housing, Employment, Anti-Social Behaviour, Mental Health, Pharmacists & GPs and Drug & Alcohol treatment staff:

9x Alcohol Intervention & Brief Advice

A total of 154 people attended and completed the 3 hour Alcohol IBA session.

6x Basic Drug Awareness

A total of 92 people attended and completed the 1 day BDA course.

2x Community Hospital Alcohol Detoxification (CHAD) training

A total of 18 people attended and completed this course.

5x Connect 5 Stage 1-3 Mental Wellbeing training

A total of 29 people attended and completed the 3 stages of the Connect 5 course in the Isles of Scilly.

6x Dual Diagnosis courses

A total of 104 people attended and completed the 2 day Dual Diagnosis course.

The availability of this course has been opened up to the wider circulation!

1x Stress Management: Faster EFT Eutaptics Seminar

FEFT/Eutaptics is a system that looks at how our minds successfully create our problems and subsequently how we can work with the mind to change them.

A total of 57 people attended the evening seminar in June 2019.

11x Motivational Interviewing (general)

A total of 167 people attended and completed the 1 day general MI courses.

7x Young People’s Substance Awareness and Screening

A total of 50 people attended and completed the 1 day YP Screening course

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Safer Cornwall are a working partnership involving: