International Overdose Awareness Day

August 6th, 2019 by

On Friday 30th August 2019 Cornwall DAAT and partners will be holding an awareness and training event to coincide with International Overdose Awareness Day.

Every year in Cornwall a proportion of drug related deaths could have been averted by prompt action at the scene. This could be something simple like calling an ambulance immediately or carrying out prompt and effective first aid. Due to the associated illegality of drug use these simple and potentially life-saving actions are sometimes either delayed or not carried out at all. Myths such as calling an ambulance will also alert the Police still abound.

This will be the third successive event in Cornwall to raise awareness of drug overdose, first aid and many related issues. Previous events have been held in Truro and Penzance. It will be held in the White River Centre at St Austell between 1000 and 1600. As per previous years there will be training in first aid to include resuscitation, placing someone in the recovery position and administering the life-saving drug Naloxone which is now widely available in Cornwall thanks to great partner agency working. Recognising that someone is overdosing and acting quickly is important. Breaking down the stereotypes, letting people know the facts and myth busting is very much a part of this day. Leaflets and other information will be available together with experienced personnel to answer questions. We have signposted many people in the past towards relevant services and support.

To that end, volunteers will include staff and service users from Cosgarne Hall, Freshstart, Addaction workers, DAAT and the Community Safety Team.

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Online survey for families of former members of the UK Armed Forces with a substance use problem

July 10th, 2019 by

Thanks to funding from Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT), Adfam is working with the University of York to find out about the experiences and needs of families of former members of the UK Armed Forces with substance use problems, before utilising these findings to develop a new peer support intervention for this group of families.

We recently launched an online survey to hear from families first-hand:
http://bit.ly/family-veterans-survey

This survey is specifically for any family member of a former member of the UK armed forces with a substance use problem. If you are eligible, please do take part and tell us more about your experiences  – and if you work with any families affected in this way please share this information with them and circulate across your networks.

The survey will take up to 45 minutes to complete.

All participants are in with a chance of winning one of two £50 high street vouchers.

Take part in the survey here:
http://bit.ly/family-veterans-survey

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Sean’s Story

July 9th, 2019 by

A new film from NHS England aims to highlight the dangers of over-prescribing of opioids for chronic pain and shows how a patient, Sean Jennings, from Cornwall changed his life with other treatment.

The film release has been timed to coincide with Sean’s appearance at the House of Lords to speak at a special committee about coping with chronic pain and using alternatives from opioids to cope.

Opioids are often prescribed for patients to deal with long term pain and recent studies have challenged the appropriateness of the levels of prescribing. There is little evidence to show that they are helpful for long term pain, their use will be regulated, and their use monitored more closely now that the harms of prescribing these types of medicines are better understood.

‘Sean’s Story’ is a video that tells the story of Sean Jennings from Cornwall who had a hernia operation 25 years ago and due to an infection, ended up suffering chronic pain. For many years, Sean was taking large doses of opioids which presented numerous side effects and yet he still suffered from continued chronic pain. The film shows how long-term use of high-dose opioid prescribing had a devastating impact on his quality of life and how non-drug therapy has been life changing for Sean

As the pain continued to get worse without relief from opioids, Sean asked his GP to be put on a pain management programme. The pain management programme is specifically designed to help patients develop appropriate long-term coping strategies for living with long term pain.

Sean said: “Every day I was taking more and more painkillers, and I thought I was all right, but I really wasn’t very well. I realised that I wasn’t functioning properly and sought further help from my GP as I just couldn’t cope. He put me on the pain management programme and that changed my life.”

Through alternative therapies such as mindfulness and meditation, Sean has been able to deal with his pain without the reliance on opioids to manage. The film aims to encourage and inspire patients with chronic pain to seek alternatives to prescription opioids to help deal with their condition.

Sean added: “I learnt how to exercise gently and do a little bit of Tai Chi and mindfulness. To start with – mindfulness, I didn’t understand that but, as a sceptic, it works. I’m 18 months now without taking opioids, no gabapentin, nothing for pain whatsoever. The pain hasn’t gone away – it’s simply the way I deal with it now, and I do this through mindfulness.”

The film is also aimed at medical professionals to encourage them to consider incorporating psychological therapies into their patient’s care when they are prescribing opioids for pain. It aims to highlight the over-medication of some patients and to consider referrals to pain management courses which are widely available.

Dr Jim Huddy, who leads on chronic pain at Kernow Clinical Commissioning Group, said: “What we’re hoping for is that Sean’s story can implant what you might call a lightbulb moment for people who are in a similar situation with chronic pain, on high doses of opioids and who haven’t considered that there could be another way to manage their pain and lead their lives.

“For prescribers, I sympathise with the time-constraints and the pressures that we have in consultations. Chronic pain consultations are really challenging, and patient expectations can sometimes be high. They expect a prescription and to start the process of changing that can be really difficult. So, we totally understand why doctors often reach for the prescription pad. Hopefully that will slowly change, but it will be a slow change.”

Sean’s Story will be played in the House of Lords on Tuesday 25 June before an all-party parliamentary group on chronic pain. The group aims to raise awareness of chronic pain and to provide a forum for discussion and debate on issues relating to prevention, treatment and management of chronic pain.

Sean added: “It will be a great honour and privilege to speak at the House of Lords as this is such a personal issue for me and for many others having to live with constant pain. I hope my story will inspire and help others.”

NHS England South West Medical Director, Dr Michael Marsh, said: “This film aims to highlight to prescribers, such as GPs, and to also make patients aware that there are alternatives to opioids to help deal with chronic pain. By integrating psychological therapy with physical health services, the NHS can provide a more efficient support to this group of people with chronic pain and achieve better outcomes.”

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Faster EFT/Eutaptics

July 7th, 2019 by

The complex needs strategy aims to increase aspirations and maximise the opportunity of positive outcomes for those with multiple needs in Cornwall through:

  • Effectively co-ordinated systems of support around people experiencing complexity
  • People who understand and are willing and able to help
  • A culture of learning and adaptation to better understand needs and what works?

The Lankelly Chase research found a much poorer quality of life for those with complex needs, many having experienced adversity and trauma in childhood.

A growing body of research is revealing the long-term impacts of violence, abuse and neglect experienced during childhood.   Described as Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), they include, among other things, the witnessing or experiencing of violence or abuse, poor mental health of a parent, harmful use of alcohol and other drugs, or a parent in prison.

A modality that supports those who have had traumatic life experiences is Faster EFT/Eutaptics.  This system, developed in America, looks at how our minds successfully create our problems and subsequently how we can work with the mind to change them.  Many client case studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of this intervention for those who have experienced traumatic life events (many of us) and also for those who are manifesting physical and/or mental health problems, addictions, eating disorders, relationship issues etc.

The DAAT supported a visit by the founder of FEFT, Robert Smith, who spent time with complex needs housing and domestic abuse services in Cornwall.  In order to support our culture of learning we wanted to explore whether this modality could be piloted in this area with individuals with complex needs.

During the visit Robert Smith also agreed to deliver an evening seminar on stress management.  Invitations were sent to those on the DAAT training programme delegate list.  Over 60 delegates attended in their own time and provided unanimously positive feedback.  On the night 3 willing volunteers very bravely put themselves forward to address and change a traumatic memory that was negatively impacting their life.

We received the following feedback from one of the volunteers who was ‘tapped on’ during the course of the 2 day visit:

Following this visit and the positive feedback received, a colleague from Cornwall Council Public Health team is currently applying for funding to enable us to test the feasibility of FEFT/Eutaptics on older adults which will include those with complex needs.

Contact                                           

If you require any further please contact:
Name:    Marion Barton
Job title: Social Inclusion Lead

Email:    marion.barton@cornwall.gov.uk

 

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Safety talks around drugs and alcohol

July 7th, 2019 by

Secondary schools in Mid Cornwall have been working with the Youth Intervention Officer Pc Jay Dorman in delivering safety talks around drugs and alcohol.

With year 11 students leaving for the summer, and the summer holidays looming, students have been learning about the dangers of drugs and issues around underage drinking.

Working alongside YZUP, children are being informed about what drugs are currently out there and the risks associated with using them. Students are now aware more than ever of the health implications around drugs use. Also, the law and the consequences of being found in possession of illegal drugs which effects such matters of future employment, travel and further education.

Pc Dorman said “ Most students really understand the issues around illegal drugs when I explain the Line of Criminality, I explain that when a person buys their drugs, they are supporting, County Lines, Modern slavery, Human trafficking, organised crime and potentially, Terrorism.” “Criminal gangs earn money from dealing drugs which can support all the other criminal activities on a larger scale. It’s a question of morals, do you want to support suffering of others to get your kicks?”

We are also encouraging young people to take positive action by calling an ambulance if they believe one of their friends has taken a drug and is having a medical episode. Getting medical help on scene as quickly as possible could save their life!

Further educational work will continue in schools to hopefully keep our children safe for this summer and beyond!

 

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HOT at RCHT

June 6th, 2019 by

Innovative ‘HOT Team’ project to address alcohol A&E figures

In April 2018, national figures demonstrated that the number of people being admitted to A&E departments in England is the highest since records began.  Additional research has evidenced that a substantial amount of individuals frequently attending A&E departments are struggling with problematic drug and alcohol use.

Addaction, Cornwall’s commissioned drug and alcohol treatment service, has launched a rapid response team to cut the number of people frequently attending the hospital’s A&E department due to alcohol or drugs.

The HOT Team (Hospital Outreach Team) is the first team in the country to link up with a major Hospital to deliver a collaborative service offer to patients struggling with problematic alcohol and/or drug use, often becoming frequent attenders.

Addaction’s HOT team and RCHT was recently featured on ITV West Country News and the project is clearly thriving; with RCHT reporting a dramatic reduction in frequent attender numbers. The report was overwhelmingly positive and reflected the dynamic and innovative work being done in Cornwall to address the needs of some of our most vulnerable community members.

As a result of the HOT team’s success in Cornwall, the Government is now evaluating the project and considering delivering it across the country’s 50 major hospitals. This project is a great example of the collaborative work between the Commissioning team and Addaction, who continue to support a multi-agency response and service offer to individuals struggling with various vulnerabilities, including drug and alcohol related harm.

Author: Anna MacGregor

 

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Prince’s Trust Recruitment

June 3rd, 2019 by

 Are you looking for a new challenge?

If you are 16 – 25 and not currently in education, employment or training come along to Truro Community Fire Station on the 19th June to find out more about The Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service Prince’s Trust Team programme and how to join Team 17 starting later this month!

The programme is a 12 week development course with the aim to increase confidence, motivation and skills.

On this action packed programme you’ll take part in a community project, an exciting residential, two weeks work experience in a career of your choice and many more challenges.

You will gain regulated qualifications in Emergency First Aid at Work as well as the Princes Trust Level One Certificate in Employment, Teamwork and Community Skills. You will also have the opportunity to earn Maths and English Level One and Two if needed.

If you are interested in joining the team or would like to refer someone else please complete an online referral form at http://bit.ly/PTTInfo .

To book a place on the taster day please visit http://bit.ly/Team17TasterDay .

*This course does not affect benefits

 

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1521 staff trained

June 2nd, 2019 by

Community Safety & DAAT Training Programme 2018/19 End of Year Report

This report covers the 12 month period April 2018 – March 2019, during which time the following training courses have been delivered:
  • 18x Alcohol Intervention & Brief Advice

A total of 317 people attended and completed the 3 hour Alcohol IBA session in 2018/19.

In additional to this, there was 3 Alcohol IBA Health Check sessions run for specific teams which were attended and completed by another 24 people, making a total of 341 people in year.

  • 11x Basic Drug Awareness PLUS 1 Train the Trainer session 

A total of 222 people attended and completed the 1 day BDA course in 2018/19.

  • Train the Trainer – 1 day course – (Trainer: Kim Hager)

Developing the bank of trainers who can deliver our local course. Following the Basic Drug Awareness Train the Trainer session on 26th November 2018 we have an additional 6 trainers for this course.  All 6 trainee trainers were assigned to future BDA course dates to train alongside the existing trainers.  This has been attended by 4 trainees so far with plans to co-train again in future courses to build experience.

  • 2x Blue Light course 

A total of 36 people attended and completed the 1 day Blue Light course in 2018/19.

The Blue Light Project is Alcohol Concern’s national initiative to develop alternative approaches and care pathways for people who are dependent drinkers, who resist change and are a high users of public services.

  • 14x Community Hospital Alcohol Detoxification (CHAD) training 

Between March 2018 and November 2018 work was carried out to identify and upskill Lead nurses within CFT to provide in-service leadership, training and development on the delivery of CHAD.

An initial Train the Trainer session was delivered on 30th January 2019 led by Angela Andrews.  Since then the above courses have been delivered by CFT nurses with DAAT and GP support.

A total of 106 people have attended and completed the CHAD training session in 2018/19 (this course is delivered annually for nursing competencies).

In addition, 2 Home Alcohol Detox training sessions have been delivered across 5 pharmacies, to enable them to support home detoxification from alcohol.

  • 4x Connect 5 Stage 1 Mental Wellbeing training 

Connect 5 is an evidence based collaborative prevention toolkit that promotes psychological knowledge, understanding and awareness and development of skills which empower people to take proactive steps to build resilience and look after themselves.

A total of 59 people attended and completed a Stage 1 Connect 5 course.  The subsequent Stage 2 and 3 will follow in 2019/20 programme.

  • 11x Dual Diagnosis courses 

This course is run specifically for mental health services and drug & alcohol service staff.  A total of 174 people attended and completed the 2 day Dual Diagnosis course in 2018/19.

Due to a number of requests and feedback we are looking to open the availability of this course to the wider training circulation in the 2019/20 programme.

  • 5x Mental Health First Aid courses 

A total of 76 people attended and completed the 2 day accredited Mental Health First Aid course in 2018/19.

No courses were delivered in Q4, due to the external accredited trainer moving out of county.  We are currently in the process of locating another trainer.

  • 10x Motivational Interviewing (general) 

A total of 195 people attended and completed the 1 day general MI course in 2018/19.

The DAAT have now brought the delivery of Motivational Interviewing course in-house, so we no longer require an external trainer to deliver.  Since October 2018, J

  • 7x Routine Enquiry into Adverse Childhood Experiences

A total of 137 people attended and completed the 1 day REACh training in 2018/19 (this course was introduced in Q3 of the programme).

The services that have attended and completed the REACh training in 2018/19 are DASV service staff, First Episode Psychosis Team, Young People Cornwall, Penhaligon Friends, Intercom Trust, Bosence Farm and Boswyns (including the YP Unit).

We will be organising an extra session for Young People Cornwall in June/July 2019 due to the number of staff still requiring the training.

  • 3x Time Credits and Supporting Asset Based Training 

Tempo Ltd are commissioned by DAAT to embed Time Credits into complex needs services (recovery, homelessness and Domestic Abuse) throughout the Area.  This training gives management and delivery staff an understanding of what to expect and how to utilise the currency in order to drive impact within client support planning in an asset-based approach.

A total of 42 people attended and completed the 3 hour Time Credits session in 2018/19 (this course was introduced in Q2 of the programme).

  • 11x Young People’s Substance Awareness and Screening 

A total of 133 people attended and completed the 1 day YP Screening course in 2018/19.

 

This is a total of 1521 staff in Cornwall in 2018/19.

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Celebrating Volunteers

June 1st, 2019 by

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Safer Towns One Year On

March 8th, 2019 by

Our Safer Towns Scheme, developed and coordinated by our Community Safety Team, facilitates and supports a coordinated multi-agency approach to community safety issues, to improve feelings of safety and public reassurance, reduce the risk of harm to the community and protect vulnerable groups. The partnerships work to reduce and prevent crime, disorder and anti-social behaviour. The scheme was launched last April with full governance developed for each of the towns which include; Penzance, Camborne and Redruth, Falmouth, Truro, Newquay, St Austell, Bodmin, Saltash and Liskeard. The team have successfully established the new Safer Towns and broadened the remit of the three Safer Towns which were already in existence.

An enormous amount of work has taken place over the last year to establish partnership arrangements and develop delivery plans based on crime information provided by our Amethyst Team through Town Profiles and feedback from the Cornwall Council Residents Survey.  New Town Profiles have recently been provided to the Safer Towns with delivery plans for 2019/20 being developed currently to account for changes in crime trends and also emerging issues for next year.

The scheme was supported by the Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) with £5,000 allocated to each town. Partners have reviewed priorities and put forward proposals for how the funding should be spent locally. There are a number of new exciting projects, campaigns and outcomes which have been delivered in 2018/19 and will be put in place during 2019/20 through the support of the PCC.

All Safer Towns meet on a regular basis to share current intelligence, raise concerns and deal with emerging dynamic issues collectively. A key factor in the success of the scheme is the wide membership of the groups, which include; public, private and voluntary organisations; who are able to feed in local intelligence and local issues. Each town is unique with different community safety priorities, however there have also been a number of initiatives which have been rolled out through all the Safer Towns.

A shoplifting prevention briefing presented by Devon and Cornwall Police’s Crime Prevention Officer has been organised for all Safer Towns, this provides practical information to local businesses and security teams of how to protect themselves from thefts. It also included information on evidence collection and the process around this. We received positive feedback from the sessions run to date and look to run more sessions in the future.

Blue Light Training has been provided to three pilot towns across the County; Penzance, St Austell and Bodmin. Blue Light supports individuals who are change resistant, problematic drug and alcohol users not engaged with treatment, regularly presenting to emergency services. A multi-agency meeting in each of the towns will provide a mechanism to discuss individuals on a regular basis to collectively provide full support.

A large focus for a number of the towns has been concerns around street drinking and vulnerable individuals; awareness work to ensure the public and communities are aware of local support and who to report concerns to has been extremely important in ensuring the right agencies are informed. Multi-agency walkabouts has been effective in providing reassurance to the public and businesses, targeting specific areas where we have been receiving complaints/concerns raised.

Brief overview of a few of the key initiatives which have been delivered in the towns;

  • Agreement to develop and open a town centre community safety hub accessible to the public in Penzance. The lease has been secured by Cornwall Council Nov 2018. Fire Safety assessment and remedial work in progress.
  • A 12 month pilot has been jointly funded by Penzance Town Council and Cornwall Council for an ASB Caseworker specific to Penzance. This post will be recruited to in March.
  • Agreed siting of two sharps bins in the Camborne both bins will be funded from the PCC Safer Town seed funding.
  • Safer Camborne and Safer Redruth have facilitated a review of local service provision for young people in the area. It has identified the need for a youth café in the Redruth area which will provide a safe space for local young people to go. This is still in the planning process; Safer Towns funding for Redruth will contribute to the opening of Redruth Youth Café, the facility will open in September 2019
  • In Redruth, Police and Community Safety staff are piloting monthly joint surgeries for the public regarding ASB concerns
  • Safer Camborne, Safer Redruth and Safer Penzance have held awareness days in each of the towns in order to promote activity regarding anti-social behaviour and crime to reassure public and raise awareness of partnership working in the area;
  • Shop Watch has been introduced to businesses in Redruth and Camborne, which allows shop staff to communicate with each other with the aim to reduce shoplifting by identifying prolific offenders. This is still in its infancy but training from the police prevention officer will be commencing in early 2019.
  • Safer Falmouth provided information to members of the public at Gyllyngvase Beach following public safety concerns. The events were held to provide awareness of the risk to others from leaving barbeques on the beach, as well as the harmful environmental impact.
  • Following an incident of drink spiking Safer Falmouth ran an awareness campaign to local residents. The partnership provided leaflets to households throughout Falmouth outlining how to keep safe whilst drinking as well as offering safety equipment for bottles. Falmouth University and Exeter University also provided awareness to students on the What Will Your Drink Cost campaign.
  • Truro Safe have conducted two walkabouts throughout the City, providing businesses with key contact information, as well as the opportunity to raise any concerns and find out about the work of the partnership.
  • Following concerns of access for emergency services due to poorly parked vehicles blocking roads within Killigrew Gardens, St Erme, Truro Safe; led by Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service, implemented the Think Before You Park initiative. Partners visited households throughout the area and left leaflets highlighting the responsibility drivers have to ensure that roads are accessible and the implications, if this is not considered, on emergency service response.
  • Truro Safe continues to have donation boxes available throughout the City which supports those within the City who are homeless. The partnership was pleased to provide sleeping bags and fund two outreach worker packs using the latest donations from members of the public.
  • Safer St Austell visited residents of St Blazey in August to discuss local issues following concerns that had been made and provide information on support available. Residents reiterated their concerns; which included noise nuisance. The walkabout was successful with approximately 27 households engaged. The partnership also spoke to young people in the community to understand what concerns they have and how these may be addressed. The partnership will be looking into the feedback that was provided and potential changes that could be made, which could positively impact on the issues faced by the community.
  • Further work needed to take place regarding public perception of crime within St Austell; Safer St Austell has updated the Communications Plan to take account of this priority. The objectives continue to be to promote successes and the work of the partnership, target engagement to best address concerns of safety and ensure negative concerns are addressed swiftly and effectively. The group have increased articles for local publications and the website along with social media posts. They have also updated the Community Action Days calendar for 2018/19 to promote the work of the partnership and support services including a very successful Sleep Out Event which raised awareness of homelessness. A new scheme was also introduced following this event to support the local homeless charity and promote signposting.
  • Safer Bodmin has received a full briefing on current county lines activity in the Town from the Police Intelligence Directorate. The group has prioritised raising public awareness of this complex crime and will focus on vulnerability and building resilience.
  • Mapping the services available in Bodmin against the nine reducing reoffending pathways is underway. Once any gaps have been identified it is Safer Bodmin’s ambition to influence and potentially fund services to meet the local needs.
  • Safer Bodmin have supported the Berryfields Community Centre and agreed to contribute towards the funding of this vital youth provision in the town. Planning is also underway on a youth focused event with the Bodmin Watch; this event will be based on the Junior Life Skills events and will incorporate an art work competition with the pupils from Bodmin College.  Additionally, during March 2019 Safer Bodmin will run a survey with pupils from Bodmin College to seek their views on community safety in the town and what activities they engage with and would want to see in Bodmin.  The results of this survey will inform future plans for 2019.20.
  • In Saltash there have been a number of sessions delivered to pupils and parents of Saltash.net School to raise awareness about drug misuse. These have included sessions on the impact of drug use from the police as well as harm reduction / mental health education delivered from YZUP (young persons’ substance misuse service). Safer Saltash have been working closely with Saltash.net secondary school and have recently supported their BeWell whole school drop down day focused on mental wellbeing.
  • Safer Saltash have met with the Tamar Bridge Committee to discuss the issue of people completing suicide off the Tamar Bridge. Further work in partnership with the Committee will now take place with a focus on suicide prevention. Additionally, a recent presentation at a Safer Saltash meeting from the Public Health Healthy Promotions team resulted in a decision by the group to offer a ‘Suicide Talk’ (3 hours) to a multi-disciplined group in Saltash focusing on businesses and community groups (up to 90 delegates).  Following on from this, a core group will be identified and trained in ASIST (2 days) and become Suicide First Aiders.
  • Safer Saltash identified ASB as a priority area; the group have focused on this and supported the Core’s successful OPCC bid for ‘The Friday Night Project’ and provided funding for the Saltmill initiative for young people.  Saltash has a current seasonal issue with tombstoning and work is underway to revise a leaflet containing safety advice on tombstoning and letters have been sent from Safer Saltash to Network Rail regarding concerns over access to the Network Rail owned pillar where young people are tombstoning from.  The group have also agreed to part fund a body worn camera for the local ASB caseworker.  The group are also exploring the opportunity for the Town and Waterfront Wardens to be granted Community Safety Accreditation Scheme (CSAS) powers.
  • Safer Liskeard has made an evidence based decision to purchase a needle disposal unit to be located outside the Town Council owned Sungirt Toilets. A local arrangement has been reached with regards to the safe emptying and disposal of the clinical waste and signage and comms are currently being developed to support this initiative.
  • Safer Liskeard supported National Domestic Abuse week and held a successful public engagement event at Liskeard Community Hospital on 30th November 18. The Healthy Relationships Programme has been delivered in Liskeard Secondary School and the group will be utilising some of the OPCC funding to purchase mobile phones and personal attack alarms for Domestic Abuse victims in the town.  These crime prevention/safety resources will be managed by the IDVA locally.
  • The Safer Liskeard team have identified Castle Park as an area for environmental improvement activity and have conducted a site visit to the area. This activity aims to promote residents taking pride in their town whilst improving feelings of safety and will complement the soon to be reformed ‘Friends of Castle Park’ group.  The work will include targeted multi-agency outreach; consultation with residents; fundraising for play equipment; organised activities in the park; a link to the Time Credits project and CRC unpaid work involvement in remedial work in the park.

What’s coming up?

  • Blue Light Scheme to be implemented across all towns;
  • Specialist Youth Programme led by our Phoenix Team developed to support young people involved with crime and potentially deter them through engagement;
  • Community Action Days to be completed for 2019 including a youth engagement event in Bodmin, joint Engagement events with the OPCC in all Safer Towns and walkabouts within most of the Safer Towns;
  • Initial scoping work is now taking place for a diversity festival in Bodmin to celebrate multi-cultural food and music. The purpose of this work is to build community resilience, break down barriers and promote cohesion.
  • Safer Liskeard will have a community safety stand at Liskeard Community Fair on Saturday 30th March; and Safer Saltash will be at the Saltash Regatta. These events will involve all partners and the OPCC road show van and will be a fantastic opportunity to engage with residents and to understand their needs in relation to crime, disorder and community safety.
  • Truro Safe signage to be fitted at various locations across Truro, providing information on support services;
  • Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence campaign for Truro to be piloted;
  • A number of campaigns to be developed in Newquay including; drug litter, thefts, water safety concerns;
  • Review of noise nuisance complaints 2018 and contact procedure for complaints for Falmouth;
  • working with Heartlands (Pool) business manager, residents and partner agencies to set up a Residents Community Safety Group;
  • young people’s services networking event to be held in Camborne
  • a focus on business engagement and training in Penzance
  • Mobile CCTV camera usage being investigated in Penzance and Redruth.
  • a focused countywide campaign to encourage reporting of crime and ASB to the appropriate numbers

We want to thank all the partners who have been involved with the schemes and continue to support the work of the partnership. If you would like to find out more about a particularly Safer Town please visit https://safercornwall.co.uk/safer-towns/ or email communitysafety@cornwall.gov.uk.  Please follow East Cornwall Community Safety Officer on Twitter here  https://twitter.com/LucyAllison_CSO

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Safer Cornwall are a working partnership involving: