Cornwall Licensing Policy update

February 6th, 2019 by

On January 22nd, after being proposed by the Cornwall Licensing Act Committee, Cornwall Council voted in an updated Alcohol Licensing Policy Statement. This will now be in place for the next 5 years, setting the tone for how alcohol should be sold in Cornwall.

This new policy, which can be seen in full here, embeds some important work that has been undertaken by Cornwall’s Public Health and Community Safety teams in the last 3 years.

Local Authority Public Health Departments have been a Licensing Responsible Authority since 2012, but nationally had relatively little input into Licensing cases and culture.

This gap was addressed by Public Health England (PHE) in the initial Local Alcohol Action Areas and then in their ‘Health as a Licensing Objective’ (HaLO) pilot schemes.

Cornwall was invited by PHE to participate in the 2016-17 HaLO pilot scheme, and we created a postcode responsive tool that can help to quickly assess the alcohol related risks in any given area.

 

This HaLO tool, now renamed the ‘Health Impact Licensing Tool’ (HILT) has been seen as a national example of good practice, used in PHE webinars, presented to the Local Government Association and the House of Lords Licensing Committee, and to the academic ‘United Kingdom Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies’ (UKCTAS).

The HILT tool has been used operationally to evaluate Cornwall’s Cumulative Impact Zones, and to contribute contextual evidence to a License revocation case against a premises in a violent hotspot within a Cumulative Impact Zone.

After a draft and consultation led by Julie Flower of CC Licensing team, the new Cornwall 5 year Licensing Policy Statement was voted through unopposed by full Council yesterday 22/01/19.

 

From a Public Health and Community Safety perspective, this policy:

  1. Embeds work done in the last 3 years,
  2. Puts these achievements into written policy, and
  3. Makes them a standard part of Cornwall Licensing policy and culture for the next 5 years.

This includes:

  • Public Health as a standard aspect of Licensing and alcohol retail (p6-7);
  • National guidance on responsible drinking, which can then be used to critique irresponsible drink promotions (p7);
  • The 10 Safer Towns initiative to address wider issues (p10);
  • ‘What Will Your Drink Cost?’ as an ongoing available flexible targeted messaging brand and campaign (p10);
  • Cumulative Impact Policies and mapping (p11 and 47);
  • The protection of children from harm (p21 and 66);
  • Public Health as a Responsible Authority (p49-51), including:
    • Alcohol Related Hospital Admissions;
    • The impact of alcohol in Cornwall;
    • HILT – The ‘Health Impact Licensing Tool’;
    • ARID – The ‘Assault Related Injuries Database’; and
    • Alcohol retail quality standards.
  • Drugs policies (p59-60), and
  • The responsibility of premises to have a supply of ‘spikies’ to raise awareness and keep customers safe (p65).

This now normalises pilot work that has been undertaken by the DAAT, Public Health, Safer Cornwall and Amethyst Community Safety Intelligence, allowing it to have long term application and impact in Licensing and Alcohol retail in Cornwall.

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Partnership working secures two closure orders on premises in Penzance & St Ives

January 30th, 2019 by
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Draft Domestic Abuse Bill published 21st January 2019

January 28th, 2019 by

The landmark draft Domestic Abuse Bill was published 21st January. It comes as it is revealed domestic abuse issues cost the country £66 billion a year.

To help tackle the crime, it is proposed that new legislation will:

  • introduce the first ever statutory government definition of domestic abuse to specifically include economic abuse and controlling and manipulative non-physical abuse – this will enable everyone, including victims themselves, to understand what constitutes abuse and will encourage more victims to come forward
  • establish a Domestic Abuse Commissioner to drive the response to domestic abuse issues
  • introduce new Domestic Abuse Protection Notices and Domestic Abuse Protection Orders to further protect victims and place restrictions on the actions of offenders
  • prohibit the cross-examination of victims by their abusers in the family courts
  • provide automatic eligibility for special measures to support more victims to give evidence in the criminal courts

The Home Office has published a report into the economic and social cost of domestic abuse, which reveals the crime cost England and Wales £66 billion in 2016 to 2017.

According to the research, the vast majority of this cost (£47 billion) was a result of the physical and emotional harm of domestic abuse, however it also includes other factors such as cost to health services (£2.3 billion), police (£1.3 billion) and victim services (£724 million).

It is estimated that around two million adults experience domestic abuse each year, affecting almost 6% of all adults. Women are twice as likely to be victims than men.

The draft bill will introduce measures:

  • to address coercive control and economic abuse, and how domestic abuse affects children
  • to transform the response in the justice system

The bill will also ban the distressing practice of domestic abuse victims being cross-examined by perpetrators in the family courts.

Between the draft bill and its consultation response, the government is making 120 commitments to tackle domestic abuse. Amongst these are a series of non-legislative measures which include:

  • £8 million of Home Office funding to support children affected by domestic abuse
  • a new crisis support system for those with no recourse to public funds
  • additional funding and capacity building for services for disabled, elderly and LGTB victims
  • updated support, training and guidance on economic abuse
  • new and additional training for job centre work coaches, police, social workers and probation staff to help them recognise and effectively tackle abuse
  • improved support for victims in the family court
  • additional £500,000 funding for provisions for male victims

The government estimates today that domestic abuse cost the economy £66 billion – more than the cost of alcohol and drug misuse, cigarettes and obesity combined. It affects more than 2 million people every year.

Dr Nicola Sharp-Jeffs, Director of Surviving Economic Abuse said:

Economic abuse can prevent victims from leaving an abuser and thwart their efforts to rebuild their lives safely – it can even create new risks.

Through committing to ensure that practitioners have access to training and guidance on economic abuse, the government has recognised that physical and economic safety are entwined.

These new measures will help bring economic abuse out of the shadows and will transform responses, ensuring that victim-survivors are able to access the support they so desperately need.

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Alcohol Pathways – Visit from Central Government 16th January

January 28th, 2019 by

James McGowan, Government Policy Advisor and Glasha Frank, Department of Health, Patient Flow and Access Team, who are developing national alcohol pathways came to see the work in Cornwall, which has been commended to them, and to meet the teams and commissioner responsible.The external team met with Liz Farrington, Consultant Nurse Hepatology, alongside representatives from the Alcohol Liaison Team, Addaction Hospital Outreach Team, Safeguarding leads and patients. The visit was co-ordinated by Kim Hager, Joint Commissioning Manager from the Drug and Alcohol Action Team.

Glasha Frank ‘Thanks for the thought and effort‎ that went into today. It was invaluable being able to hear and appreciate what goes into making a local initiative work, and the range of people we were able to speak to made it quite an insightful visit. Its given me quite a bit of food for thought and accounts to draw on to help build up the wider work around frequent attenders.

Hearing from ‘Patient x’ was particularly memorable.

James Magowan wrote:  ‘A massive thanks for all your time and input today, a really beneficial visit. Thanks too to Jez for the taxi work back and forth to the station! Please pass on thanks also to the Addaction team and others at the hospital for their time and input.

A fantastic opportunity to see the impact that Life Chances Fund money, alongside your own, is having for vulnerable people. I was particularly struck by the journey  the patient we met  outlined and really pleased that she will shortly be 1 year without drinking. I appreciate her journey pre-dates LCF, but it was clear from the various calls Lee needed to take that, unfortunately, there are many others who are in the position she had found herself. Please ask Addaction folk to pass on thanks to her for time and willingness to share.

Liz Farrington, who leads the hospital alcohol liaison team, said “This was a fantastic opportunity to showcase true multi-agency working from acute care through to the community. We have developed significant partnerships, with particular emphasis on frequent attenders and those with co-existing drug or mental health problems, and complex physical needs such as decompensated cirrhosis and alcohol related brain injury. Whilst we still have gaps in some services we are all committed to reducing unwarranted variation in this group of patients, in line with the NHS long term plan”.

The visit was based upon the national recognition of the creative work that is being developed and delivered by partners in Cornwall, reflecting everyone’s determination. It has also given us the opportunity to highlight areas which continue to prove challenging and would benefit from multi department guidance.

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Infection Control for Injecting Drug Users January 2019

January 24th, 2019 by

PHE and Health Protection, Cornwall and Plymouth have issued the following notice:-

  • During 2018, we have received reports of invasive injection site infections from across the South West.  This has included an outbreak of iGAS and most recently two cases of rare Fusobacterium gonidiaformans.
  • Once individuals become infected their health can rapidly deteriorate particularly within the most vulnerable segments of this population, where the consequences can be life-threatening.
  • It is imperative that anyone working with injecting drug users delivers the full range of harm reduction information and advice  – particularly around the risks of injecting site infections.
  • Some drug users lick their needles after injecting believing that this sterilises. This increases risk, due to germs we all carry in the mouth that once they enter the bloodstream of injectors, become a new threat. Please reiterate that this is not a safe practice.
  • Encourage and facilitate users with signs of infection (attached) to get prompt medical attention.
  • Needle Exchange remains a critical component of the care pathway, and is an evidence based intervention supported by NICE and the UK clinical guidelines for substance misuse. Please do everything you can to support people to be aware of the risks of sharing or reusing equipment and to use new equipment every time.

A poster detailing key advice on safe injecting and infection control. Safe_injecting_poster

Hand washing video from Harm Reduction Works

Cleaning works: how to clean a used syringe Harm Reduction Works Video

 

Harm Reduction Works injecting and infections leaflet

 

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Product recalls

December 10th, 2018 by

Product recalls are made by traders about products that have problems which could affect the safety of the consumer.  The product should not be used and should be returned to the trader.

At Christmas when we are buying presents it is worth checking the website for any goods that might of been recalled.

The latest RAPEX notifications are available on the Europa website.

Vehicle recall notices can be found on the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency website.

The latest recalls can be viewed Here 

Have a Safe and Happy Christmas

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Safer Liskeard

December 10th, 2018 by

Six months after the launch of Safer Liskeard, the town is already seeing the benefits of bringing its community safety partners together.

The group includes representatives from Cornwall Council, Liskeard Town Council, the police, fire service, and other agencies, who have targeted a set of key priorities to help improve community safety and reduce crime and anti-social behaviour.

Based on the findings from the residents’ survey and crime data the team have identified four key priorities to tackle in the coming months:

  1. Problem drug use/dangerous drug networks/county lines/cuckooing and the associated violence
  2. Domestic abuse
  3. Taking Pride in Liskeard and improved feelings of safety
  4. Comms, community engagement and building community resilience

Some steps have already been taken, including a plan to install a ‘sharps bin’ for drug litter outside the Sungirt toilets in the town.

The team also took part in Op Aident in September, which involved multi agency site visits to hotels and B&Bs in the town centre to raise awareness of child sexual exploitation and how to spot the signs.

Safer Liskeard also had a multi-agency stand at Liskeard Community Hospital during national Domestic Abuse week.

Future action will focus on a Community Safety Section at Liskeard Community Fair in March 2019, police-led shoplifting prevention training for local businesses in January and concentrated partnership activity in areas highlighted as problematic and targeted outreach with young people will take place.

Lucy Allison, Community Safety Officer for East Cornwall said:  “In the six months since its launch, Safer Liskeard has been engaging with the public and partners to see where our focus should be in the town, and we have already identified some key areas for action.

“Liskeard is a fantastic place to live and work, and we want to ensure it remains that way, and to help residents grow an even stronger feeling of pride in the town.

Residents and businesses… Report It!

If people experience anti-social behaviour; email 101@dc.police.uk, telephone 101 or use contact form here 

In an emergency call 999

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Truro Safe

December 9th, 2018 by

Truro Safe have taken part in the #ThinkB4Upark initiative led by Cornwall Fire and Rescue ServiceTruro Community Fire Station visiting residents of Killigrew Gardens, St Erme, joined by Devon & Cornwall Police Truro Police Team, our Community Safety Team and St Erme Parish Council, to highlight the importance of parking responsibly following a number of concerns raised. The partners were able to speak to residents about the concerns and highlight that motorists must consider if an emergency vehicle can get past, as not doing so is putting lives at risk by blocking off roads.

 

 

 

The hashtag #ThinkB4Upark is being used across social media in the UK by other emergency services, who are experiencing delays in getting to incidents, due to badly parked cars or driving.

The Service does not endorse this campaign as a way and means of naming and shaming members of the public. It is to raise awareness and educate drivers to think about where and how they park. For more information please visit http://bit.ly/ThinkB4Upark or to find out more about Truro Safe visit Here

 

 

 

 

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Party Time???!!!

December 7th, 2018 by

As we rush through December, with the decorations up, and all the Christmas shopping dilemmas becoming far too urgent, we also land in Christmas Party time!

This is obviously a moment to enjoy celebrating with your friends, family and colleagues, and to let off some end of year steam.

However, all of this comes with some issues to be aware of …

In a crowded bar or house, where it’s loud and you don’t know everyone, it becomes even more important than usual to keep your eyes on your drink, and stay alert to your own safety.

So firstly, we’d like to remind you about advice we gave out recently around spiking, how to stay safe, and what to do as soon as you think someone’s drink has been spiked.

Tips on keeping yourself safe from spiking can be found by clicking here

And more advice about how to stay alert and how trespond can be found here

All of this is summarised in this helpful ‘What Will Your Drink Cost?’ leaflet.

If you’re drinking from a bottle, ask the bar staff if they have any spikies, which make it impossible for someone to tamper with your drink.

(See more info at the end of this page.)


Secondly, plan your journey home before you go out.

Pre-book a Taxi?

Or agree a driver for the evening?

If it’s your turn to be the designated driver, make sure your passengers know that your soft drinks are on them for the night, but remember that you can also make use of the supply of free water the bar can give you. (Just add ice, a straw, a slice of lime, and accessorise to make that water go incognito – if that’s an issue for you.) 

Remember that your body processes alcohol at about 1 unit per hour, so if you drink 5 Pints, it will take you over 12 hours to be under the drink driving limit.


Thirdly, know your own limits with alcohol and don’t imagine that you gain a December Drinking SuperPower that means that you can withstand any unknown exotic combination of mysteriously unpronounceable drinks!

Respect your body – including your head the next day – and stick to normal amounts of what you are used to.

You’ll thank yourself tomorrow!


Fourthly, if people around you get too lively in the wrong way, consider your own safety before trying to become the UN peacekeeping force.

Generally, reasoning with drunk strangers is more likely to get you into trouble than get them out of it.

Walk Away!

Finally, here’s a full sheet of tips for a Safe Night Out

If you find yourself needing advice or support for an alcohol issue for yourself or someone you know, call:

Addaction Cornwall, on 0333 2000 325


And here’s a reminder of the recommended safe alcohol levels.

Your body still works this way in the festive season!

And above all, have a Great Time!!!

Weekly Alcohol Guidelines

 

Additional advice on responding to spiking incidents:

Report anything you think has happened to The Police or the Cornwall Sexual Violence Helpline as soon as you can.

The Police or a Doctor will need to take blood and urine samples. Most drugs leave the body within 72 hours of being taken, but some can be gone in 12 hours so it’s important to be tested as soon as possible.

If you have been sexually assaulted, even if you are too upset to report it to the police immediately, you should try to seek medical assistance if you have been hurt or injured. Any forensic evidence obtained during tests can be stored.

https://www.devon-cornwall.police.uk/advice/your-community/drugs-and-alcohol/alcohol/drink-spiking/

If you begin to feel really drunk after only a couple of drinks, get help from a trusted friend or a member of staff from the club or pub management.

Stay away from situations that you do not feel comfortable with.

Remember that alcohol can affect your actions and reactions as well as reduce your ability to be alert.

https://www.devon-cornwall.police.uk/advice/your-personal-safety/staying-safe-while-out-for-the-night/

Who to call for help:

Police:

If you are in danger, please dial 999 immediately or 101 in a non-emergency.

If you ring 999 but can’t talk, make sure the Police know you are there by coughing or tapping the handset, or by dialling 55.

Cornwall Sexual Violence Helpline: 0300 777 4777

More advice from the NHS:
https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/healthy-body/drink-spiking-and-date-rape-drugs/

Follow #cornwallpartytime on Fb and Twitter

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Safer St Austell sleep out in solidarity

December 7th, 2018 by

Spending a night under the stars may seem like a good idea during the summer, but a group of community workers got a glimpse of the grim reality of homelessness at a special event in St Austell last night.

Officers from the Safer St Austell team spent the night at White River Place protected only by sleeping bags and cardboard.

The event was organised to highlight the issue of homelessness, as well as to help promote the local support services available and to demonstrate how well individuals are supported within St Austell.

 

The group, which included representatives from Addaction, Cosgarne Hall, SAHA Freshstart, Cornwall Council’s Community Safety, Localism and Anti-Social Behaviour Team, Mayor Gary King, Deputy Mayor Tim Styles and Cornwall Councillor James Mustoe slept out between 10pm and 6am, enduring a long damp night.

Helen Catherall, Addaction worker, said: “Homelessness is a sign. It tells us that there has been a crisis or that there is an underlying issue. Ironically, homelessness is barrier to accessing support when it’s needed the most. This is why it is so important to report rough sleeping to Streetlink either via their online reporting system or by telephoning Streetlink on 0300 500 0914 to ensure support is offered.”

Gareth Bray, Chairman of Cosgarne Hall Board of Trustees, said: “St Austell has a long history supporting those who are homeless going back to the 1800s and we are pleased to be involved with the sleep out to continue to raise awareness around support services. We want to highlight that although we are raising awareness through this event those who have attended had a choice to sleep out whereas those who are homeless do not have this choice.”

Sue James, Cornwall Council’s portfolio holder for environment and public protection, said:  “Homelessness is an issue we are determined to tackle, and events such as this help raise awareness of the problem.

“It is vital we do all we can to encourage people to contact Streetlink if you see anyone sleeping on the streets. The sooner we are informed, the quicker we can offer the support that these vulnerable people need.”

Advice for residents and businesses

  • If you see someone sleeping rough you can contact Streetlink via www.streetlink.org.uk or 0300 500 0914 (or 999 if they need urgent medical assistance).  Individuals sleeping rough can contact the Cornwall Housing Options Team on 0300 1234 161 or drop into an Information Service (formerly called One Stop Shop).
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Safer Cornwall are a working partnership involving: