Holocaust Memorial Day on Monday 27th January

January 20th, 2020 by

Holocaust Memorial Day is the day for everyone to remember the millions of people murdered in the Holocaust, under Nazi Persecution, and in the genocides which have followed in Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia, and Darfur. 2020 marks 75 years since the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau and the theme for HMD 2020 reflects on how people have stood together in order to stop division and the spread of hatred in our society.

With this key anniversary in mind we the Diverse Communities Team (DCT) from Devon and Cornwall Police have been working with the Canon at Truro cathedral (Canon Alan Bashforth) and other key members of the HMD 2020 planning team and we have now secured the attendance of art work by Albert REUSS (1889-1975) via the kind involvement of Newlyn Art gallery which hold this work.

Albert REUSS was a Jewish painter and sculpture born in Vienna who came to England in 1938 following Hitler’s annexation of Austria. REUSS lost many members of his family as well as his possessions and the reputation he had built up as an artist. He continued to work in England but his style changed dramatically reflecting the trauma he had suffered. The works of REUSS are expected to attract art lovers and those interested in his story and will be an integral part of the HMD 2020 display and event.

In addition to the works of REUSS the DCT will have display in place detailing some of the history of the Holocaust and real life stories from survivors of subsequent genocides. REUSS work and the DCT display will be in place from 20th January until 3rd February.

On HMD itself (27th January 2020) support groups and agencies have been invited to take part in order to represent their communities and to educate visitors on how their communities were effected during the holocaust and other genocides and how hostility and prejudice still exists today and the need for us all to “stand together” against hate.

The plan for the event at Truro Cathedral  for HMD on Monday 27th January 2020 is as follows:

  • 13:00 hours: The candle lighting ceremony in remembrance. On completion visitors can continue to view the stands and the artwork and this will be an engagement opportunity for stall holders.
  • 17:30 hours Evensong service.
  • 18:15 hours view art work.
  • 19:30 hours a discussion about Albert REUSS life story by experts in this field.

Please come along and help us remember those effected and show that we all “stand together” against hate.

To read more about Holocaust Memorial Day please go to their website click the Banner below

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What will your drink cost this Christmas

December 16th, 2019 by

Who will you spend Christmas with? A Paramedic, a Firefighter or even a Police Officer?

This festive season, as many of us drink more than intended, and we’re urging you to think about how and who you could spend Christmas with.

The Safer Cornwall partnership festive safe drinking campaign “What Will Your Drink Cost?” is asking anyone out enjoying festivities over the coming weeks to drink sensibly while enjoying Cornwall and Christmas.

The campaign not only ask you to think how your evening might end and what the impact could be, but also how to drink sensibly busting some common drinking myths!

Raph is a specialist paramedic who explains why sticking to one type of alcohol doesn’t mean you can drink more.

Other myths include:

  • Having a tactical chunder doesn’t get rid of the effects of alcohol – as the alcohol will already be absorbed into your blood, and you could end up very drunk and needing to go to hopsital
  • Drinking coffee doesn’t sober you up, and it’s not a way to help you drive home. The coffee just masks the effect by making you feel less tired
  • Having a large meal before you go out doesn’t give you the ability to drink more, it just makes the alcohol hang around longer in your system and you could end up drinking too much and getting yourself more drunk
  • If you’ve had more than a couple the night before, you won’t be okay to drive the next morning, as it could take over 12 hours for the alcohol to leave your body and be safe to drive. You could end up losing your licence
  • Taking paracetamol before bed doesn’t help your hangover, it’s really bad for your kidneys and the effect wears off while you’re asleep. You’re better off taking them in the morning when you wake up.

Drinking too much can impact on our already stretched services such as the NHS and Police force. Those services will be more than happy to help if you really need it, but they don’t really want to spend time with you because you’ve had too much to drink.

Drinking more than normal can bring on a false sense of confidence. This can lead to bad choices or decisions, such as drink driving or getting into arguments and fights. In a few cases, this can lead to people ending up in hospital, losing their drivers licence, getting fined, being arrested, or having accidents which put themselves or other people in danger.

The Council and its partners hope everyone enjoys the festive season, go out and have fun but please drink sensibly, and to plan how you’ll get home safely.

We don’t want to be the Christmas Grinch and say that you shouldn’t drink at all, because we know that for most of us that’s not going to happen! What we’re asking is that people go out and have fun in a way that doesn’t impact on others, or potentially affect their own future.

Here’s Jez Bayes, our Alcohol Strategy Lead giving us some top tips to enjoy Cornwall and drink sensibly this festive season:

  • Alternate alcoholic drinks with soft drinks or water
  • Keep an eye on your drink when out, and don’t get to the point where you wouldn’t notice if someone spiked you
  • Plan how you will get home – book a taxi in advance, organise a lift, or have a designated driver in your group
  • Don’t attempt to reason with people who have drunk too much

 

 

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Santa’s top safety tips

December 16th, 2019 by

OPSS has partnered with Santa, Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents, Chartered Trading Standards Institute, Netmums, and the Child Accident Prevention Trust to warn against second rate toys.

We have produced 12 safety tips for people to use when buying for children:

  1. Look for the CE symbol: This means the manufacturer has assessed the toy for safety. Find the symbol on the label or box.
  2. Check it’s for kids: Festive novelties can look like toys. Keep them away from kids.
  3. Reputation matters: Check the suppliers who have a good reputation for safe and reliable toys. They’ll have good safety standards and refund policies.
  4. Button battery safety: Christmas toys may have button batteries – which can prove lethal if ingested. Check they are screwed in safely before giving to a child.
  5. Check age restrictions: Toys must be clearly marked with age restrictions, which assess risks such as choking hazards. Always follow the age recommendations.
  6. Consider special needs: Remember that children with special needs might be more vulnerable, and make sure to shop accordingly.
  7. Choking hazards: Avoid toys with small parts or loose fabric – they can be a choking hazard.
  8. Loose parts: Loose ribbons on toys and costumes can be dangerous. Think before you buy.
  9. Inspect toy boxes: Wear and tear can make a toy unsafe. Check your children’s toys and get them repaired if necessary.
  10. Supervise when you need to: Some toys need an adult on hand during playtime. Read all the instructions so you can keep things under control.
  11. Tidy up: Boxes, plastic bags and wire can be a hazard. Clear away all packaging once everything’s unwrapped.
  12. Celebrate a safe Christmas: Completing these checks can save you a lot of stress later. Remember to get batteries (and dispose of these safely too)!

 

#santasafety

 

 

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Delivering safe spaces and safe workplaces – 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence

December 12th, 2019 by

Safer Cornwall, supported by Safer Futures, promoted the International 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence campaign, by delivering a local workplace focused initiative; encouraging employers and local businesses to provide a safe space in the community for anyone experiencing domestic abuse and sexual violence, in addition to creating a supportive and safe work place for staff.

The initiative was launched on 25th November in Truro Cathedral by Kate Kennally, Jim Pearce (CIOS Police Commander and Safer Cornwall Chair) and Lyn Gooding (CEO, First Light).

Safer Cornwall hosted walkabouts across all of the 10 Safer Towns and asked businesses to pledge their support, by advertising themselves as safe spaces to the public; using posters and merchandise with contact information for Safer Futures and also downloading our new Cornwall Council model DASV Employment Policy Template to provide information, safety and support to their staff.

Overall, the campaign engaged with 188 businesses during the Safer town walkabouts who all signed the pledge to protect customers and staff by providing a Safe Space. Of these businesses 123 have requested further training to develop their skills and knowledge of domestic abuse. The campaign was featured on Heart FM and Liskeard Radio and has had substantial public engagement through the team’s social media coverage which has reached over 41,000 people and the campaign videos have had over 11,000 views.

The campaign has had great support across all partnership agencies and the wider public, and will serve as a great foundation for all future campaigns, including Sexual Abuse and Sexual Violence Awareness Week Monday 3rd February 2020 to Sunday 9th February 2020; watch this space.

 

 

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Special Recognition for Coastline Housing and the DAAT

December 9th, 2019 by

Coastline Housing and Drug and Alcohol Action Team (DAAT) staff attended the Markel 3rd Sector Awards on Friday 6th December in relation to their work with Naloxone.

Coastline Housing have been working on the Naloxone initiative with Cornwall and Isles of Scilly DAAT since 2015. Provision of Naloxone is an evidence-based intervention that can save lives by blocking or reversing the effects of a Heroin or opioid overdose, and Coastline Housing have been working with the DAAT to incorporate it into their services.

Coastline Housing were nominated for the Collaboration (Integration) Award which recognises ways of working in partnership with other organisations or services, achieving outcomes that would otherwise not have been achieved, and they were finalists in 4 categories:

  • Lynsey Johns, a Leadership Award for her outstanding leadership across supported accommodation, which has positively affected the quality of care;
  • Derek Law, for Making a Difference, where  significant changes have been made that have positively impacted on outcomes for people using their services;
  • Lynsey Johns, Amanda Addo,  Lee Newnham and Zena Mower Bryant  an Innovative Quality Outcomes Award, recognising their work and that of their teams around Trauma Informed Care (TIC) and the creation of psychologically Informed Environments (PIE) where people using their services feel physically and psychologically safe;
  • Jo Cowling and the DAAT for the collaborative work around Naloxone.

The judges also gave special recognition to the work of Coastline colleagues who have impressively trained over 400 people and saved 26 lives using Naloxone to reverse the effects of opiate overdoses.  This very significant work keeps people alive until they can access further treatment and social support enabling them to move forwards positively in their lives.

Marion Barton of the DAAT: “It is such a privilege to be part of this vital work, to work alongside such outstanding and dedicated colleagues and to enjoy this special occasion where their work is nationally recognised. Thank you to Allister Young, Louise Beard and all managers and staff at Coastline, Addaction colleagues and also my manager, Kim Hager for supporting the continuation of such amazing work with Naloxone.”

 

 

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Good News Story

December 6th, 2019 by

CJ was an alcohol client with Addaction 6 years ago. In November CJ and her family invited staff at Addaction to the cap and gowning awards at Truro Cathedral.

CJ studied hard for over 3 years to complete a Counselling Foundation Degree topped up to a BSc Hons Applied Social Science with Plymouth University.

CJ was a participant in a women’s group that was initially started in Falmouth and she went on to become the first female to facilitate this group.  CJ made a commitment to remain abstinent, become a volunteer and support women in recovery. She also worked part time mainly as an evening support worker at Chy and in various caring roles.

Staff at Addaction were very proud to watch her walk down the Cathedral with scroll in hand and a beautiful smile.

CJ has just completed an application to Addaction for a job. What an amazing woman.

 

 

 

 

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Festive Alcohol Messaging

December 5th, 2019 by

All this Autumn, Cornwall Public Health, Healthy Cornwall and Cornwall DAAT have been promoting the use of the ‘Drinks Meter’ app through our ‘One Too Many?’ campaign.

This will be promoted again within the 2019 ’What Will Your Drink Cost?’ festive messaging campaign, linking in with the Devon and Cornwall Police drink driving campaign.

In the first part of the campaign we have invited members of the public, especially people who feel that they are ‘normal’ drinkers, to make use of the self-monitoring ‘Drinks Meter’ app. This has been highlighted on our social media feeds, as well as on BBC Radio Cornwall.

As Christmas approaches we are going to use the “What will your drink cost?” campaign to post a series of short videos on social media.

These will focus on trusted groups of people who are involved in the safety and wellbeing of drinkers, such as Paramedics, A&E Nurses and Doctors, Police, and Fire fighters.

These people will bust common drinking myths, such as wrongly feeling that you are safe to drive early the next morning after a late drinking session, that walking home in the dark while drunk is safe, that coffee reduces the harmful impact of alcohol, that painkillers are a good idea when you’ve had lots of alcohol, and that being sick enables you to safely carry on drinking.

These video clips will be posted through December and into the New Year, and will also promote the Drinks Meter. This app which will help people to set themselves limits during the festive season, and to make sure they maintain or return to a sensible pattern in January.

 

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Bringing Alcohol Awareness to the Airwaves – 11th – 17th November 2019

November 26th, 2019 by

Jez Bayes, the Alcohol Strategy Lead for Safer Cornwall, brought Alcohol Awareness Week 2019 to the airwaves; visiting BBC Radio Cornwall and asking the listeners to think about their own relationship with alcohol.

As many as 1 in 3 people in the South West don’t realise that they drink too much, which can lead to other effects that people would not normally associate with alcohol; such as not sleeping well, feeling tired in the mornings, feeling stressed. Jez drew focus to the ‘one every night’ habit; often considered to be a culturally acceptable level of drinking.

Residents of Cornwall were invited to download the ‘Drink’s Meter’ smartphone app to help them become aware and monitor their own level of drinking. The app is available on the Google Play store or Apple App store and allows people to track exactly what and how much they have drunk throughout the week, calculating how many ‘drink’ calories have been consumed and how many ‘food’ calories that equates to. Users can also track how much money they have spent on alcohol.

The app goes on to advise users on how to develop healthier drinking by recommending, for example, having more days across the week without having alcohol.

Safer Cornwall promoted Alcohol Awareness week 2019 across social media; 56 people clicked on the featured link (https://www.healthycornwall.org.uk/onetoomany) to download the Drinks Meter app over the 7 days and we will continue to promote and share the link in the weeks leading up to the pending festivities.

 

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Event to help keep shops safe in Penzance

November 18th, 2019 by

A special training event held by Safer Penzance for businesses took place in St John’s Hall last week. The event, organised by the Safer Penzance partnership and delivered by Devon and Cornwall Police’s Crime Prevention Officer, Andy Bulley, gave local shops the opportunity to come and find out more about the measures they can take to protect their business from shoplifting.

The Town’s ASB Caseworker, Dorian Thomas also gave a presentation on how he works closely with the police to placesanctions on those who shoplift in the Town.

Recorded crime overall in Penzance over the past year has reduced by 13%, with the greatest reductions seen in theft offences such as shoplifting, criminal damage and violence as shown in the latest figures from the Safer Cornwall partnership. Shoplifting figures for September show that Penzance has had a 36% (81 offences) reduction when compared with the previous year.

Initially, following local agencies’ work to increase awareness of the importance of reporting, reported levels of anti-social behaviour in the town increased. All of the additional work and resources put in to tackle the problem is now starting to show an improvement, with the latest figures showing a reduction of 18%, particularly in anti-social behaviour linked to street drinking.

The Safer Penzance partnership is made up of Cornwall

ASB Caseworker, Dorian Thomas explains how he uses evidence to sanction shoplifters

Council, Devon and Cornwall Police, Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service, National Probation Service, Dorset, Devon and Cornwall Community Rehabilitation Company, Penzance BID, Penzance Town Council, Addaction, St Petrocs, Cornwall Housing, Growing Links, the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner for Devon and Cornwall and NHS Kernow.

Shoplifting remains a priority for the Town. Other priorities identified for Safer Penzance include anti-social behaviour, alcohol and drug use, domestic abuse, community engagement and provisions for young people. To view the latest delivery plan please visit safercornwall.co.uk/safer-towns/penzance/

To find out more about shoplifting visit: devon-cornwall.police.uk/advice/your-business/shoplifting-robbery/

To report shoplifting please call the police non-emergency number on 101 or report online at devon-cornwall.police.uk/contact/contact-forms/report-something/

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Time Credits: a success story but what does the future hold?

October 16th, 2019 by

Impact and successes

Time Credits, commissioned by Cornwall Council has been delivered by Tempo since 2017.  The project helps to support vulnerable individuals with multiple needs to better engage with and contribute to their communities by earning credits through volunteering and spending them at the various spend opportunities that have been created across the county.

The first client group was made up of people with complex and multiple needs, including drug and alcohol problems or those experiencing issues with homelessness.  The idea being that if we could make it work for our most vulnerable individuals we could make it work for anyone.   The project started in Penzance so spend partners could be successfully recruited before rolling out to other areas.  Time Credits now work with those who have experienced Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence and also with young people and has expanded across Cornwall.

This is the Cornwall Time credit that was co-produced with service users and agencies in Cornwall.  Individuals are awarded a time credit for each hour of volunteering.

 

This has been a very successful project, exceeding all targets.  There are now over 40 spend partners, including  Cornwall College, Merlin and WCT cinemas, Better Leisure; Hall for Cornwall and Flambards.  There are also 50 Earn partners/Community groups involved including Addaction, Harbour Housing, Newstart and other supported housing providers; DASV services and refuges; Young people services including the YOS and accommodation foyers.  There are 644 signed up members, which is almost 3 times more than the target of 235 people.

The Tempo National Impact on success states that:

  • 80% report improved quality of life
  • 63% feel more able to contributed to the community and other people
  • 59% share their skills with others
  • 57% feel less isolated and lonely
  • 55% develop new friends and acquaintances
  • 54% feel more positive about their future

 

One of our Earn Partners said the following:

“Supporting the residents to engage in voluntary work and being able to acknowledge and reward them is a massive boost to their confidence, self-esteem & well-being.”

Rachel Battleday, Cosgarne Hall

“Time Credits makes me more engaged and involved with STAK outings and has allowed me to try things and visit places I wouldn’t have been able to on my pension. It’s such a wonderful idea.”

St Austell Community Kitchen User

 

Moving forwards

The contract and funding for this very successful project is due to come to an end in March 2020.  It has achieved all targets; signed up almost 3 times the number of vulnerable individuals than expected.  It is now time for us to decide whether or not this project continues.

In November, a visioning day, is being planned in order to consider the options and agree the best way to progress.

 

 

 

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Safer Cornwall are a working partnership involving: