Cornwall Pride

July 28th, 2018 by

Our Pride 2018

This year once again Cornwall Pride will be returning to Newquay. After the pridetastic event last year, how could it not return! On Saturday 25 August why not come and join Cornwall’s celebration of diversity, you are all are welcome to attend along with colleagues, friends and family.

Themes for this year

In line with a Safer Cornwall priority to increase the reporting of hate crime, the service is joining with Devon and Cornwall Police to say “let’s shOUT” about hate crime.

As always we will be promoting recruitment and our apprentices will be there to promote the roles within the service and give their first hand experiences of what it is like to be a firefighter in Cornwall.

Flying the flag

 

This year the Council and the Service will be flying the Pride rainbow flag for the week running up to Pride and the day at New County Hall and Service HQ Tolvaddon.

There will be other rainbow additions to this year’s Pride including rainbow epaulettes. Now supported by the National Fire Chiefs Council, members of the service will be wearing their rainbow epaulettes with Pride on 25 August and the week running up to the day.

Getting involved

If you would like to come along and join the parade please be at the Beach Car Park Newquay no later than 11.30, the flag waving and parade beings at midday.

If you would like to be more involved on the day or have an idea to make our Pride attendance even better then please contact Kathryn Billing Strategic Lead for sex, sexual orientation and gender self-identity.

Kathryn Billing, Area Manager Service Delivery, Service Headquarters

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Domestic abuse co-ordinator job opportunity

July 25th, 2018 by

Job Description

Primary Location: Cornwall-Liskeard
Other Locations: Cornwall-Truro
Job: Community safety
Organisation: Cornwall Council
Job Posting: 19-Jul-2018, 13:21:19
Hours per week: 37
Job Type/Contract type: Fixed term
Interview Date: 23-Aug-2018
Closing Date: 08-Aug-2018, 23:59:00
Salary Range: £32,641 – £39,961

About the role & About us

To support and coordinate the multi-agency response to domestic abuse and sexual violence (DASV) in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly

To be a driving force in the implementation of the Domestic Abuse & Sexual Violence (DASV) Strategy including:

  • Implementation of the DASV Delivery Plan
  • Commissioning and contract management of DASV services
  • Implementation of recommendations from Domestic Homicide Reviews
  • Quality Assurance and Improvement Plans
  • Performance Management across complex multi-agency systems

To supportservice development andredesign; process and policy; development and improvement. This will include influencing change within Cornwall Council and its partner agencies such as Police, Probation Services, Health, voluntary Sector and Private Sector and will include planning, performance improvement and evaluation of projects and services to ensure innovative and effective responses to DASV.

To support robust contract management for commissioned services to ensure contractual compliance for service delivery and additional aspects such as safeguarding, equality and diversity and health and safety and identify risks associated with service delivery and finance and reputational risk; escalating risk to Managers and supporting the development of plans to mitigate against those risks and implementing risk reduction plans.

This is a 12 month Maternity fixed term contract to provide cover for a member of staff who is absent because of maternity leave,until they return to work and may represent a suitable secondment opportunity for existing Cornwall Council employees. If you wish to be considered for a secondment, please obtain your manager’s permission before applying.

This position will be subject to a enhanced criminal record disclosure check.

Cornwall Council is committed to safeguarding and is an equal opportunities employer.

More information about working for Cornwall Council is available here

About you

The successful applicant will have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the complexities and dynamics of domestic abuse and sexual violence for male and female, child, young persons and adult victims and perpetrators and safeguarding children and adults.

You will also have demonstrable comprehensive knowledge and experience of problem solving, partnership working and developing and implementing innovative approaches to new or existing services to improve outcomes and manage risks.

You must have considerable experience of building effective working relationships with key partners and stakeholders in the field of DASV and in designing, leading and project/performance managing DASV initiatives in order to determine the direction of future service delivery and commissioning.

A track record of successfully working with partners and external bodies to deliver complex objectives with tangible outcomes for the benefit of customers and/or service users is required for this post.

You will require the ability to convey complex issues in both verbal and written format along with good negotiation skills to ensure partner engagement to the agenda which realises positive results.

To apply

Please view the Role Profile; your application will need to explain how you meet the stated criteria. More guidance is available on how to complete the application and your supporting statement.

Please click on the apply button to register or complete an application form.

Apply Online

 

This position will close at midnight on the closing date.

 

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Suspected drug related death and hospitalisations in Camborne

July 7th, 2018 by

There’s no quality control with illegal drugs. You can never be sure what’s in a pill or powder– even if someone tells you what’s in it, they might be wrong – and you don’t know how you will react to a particular drug or particular dose. Everyone is different and drugs can affect people in different ways. Some pills are more powerful than others and could make you seriously ill, and some are lethal as Shakira’s tragic death shows.

Public Health England Advice to the public

  • If you have decided you are going to take a drug, try a small amount of it first and wait at least an hour to see what the effect is before considering taking any more. Some drugs, including those commonly found in ecstasy, have a delayed effect, so you run an even greater risk of overdose if you top up too soon because it doesn’t yet seem to be working.
  • If you have taken ecstasy, take regular breaks from activities like dancing, to cool down. Keep hydrated by sipping no more than a pint of water or non-alcoholic drink every hour.
  • The risk of overdose is much higher when substances are mixed with other drugs or alcohol. Don’t take multiple substances or mix with alcohol at the same time.
  • If you’ve taken something and start to feel unwell, take time out to look after yourself and ask for help if you need it. If the problem doesn’t improve or is getting worse, you should seek medical help. You won’t be reported to the police.
  • If you want to talk to someone in confidence, you can contact Addaction Cornwall on 0333 2000325
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Campaign to raise awareness of County Lines

July 4th, 2018 by

County Lines

Know the signs

Police have today, Tuesday 3 July, launched a campaign to raise awareness of County Lines and how the public can help spot the signs of such criminal activity ongoing in their community.

County Lines is a term used to describe urban gangs supplying drugs to other parts of the UK using dedicated mobile phone lines. The gangs are likely to exploit children or vulnerable adults to move and store drugs and they will often use coercion.

This is a national trend and there are criminal gangs using the County Lines operating model across Devon and Cornwall.

The Force’s County Lines lead, Detective Superintendent Antony Hart, said: “This week we are launching our County Lines campaign and as part of our ongoing commitment in tackling this nationwide phenomenon, we are now appealing to the public to spot the signs within their communities.

“Our recent policing activity over the last year shows that our counties are not a safe haven for drugs supply chains and anyone coming to the area intending to be involved in drugs will face prosecution.

“We have teams across the force area who focus on disrupting these drugs supply lines and on protecting the vulnerable people who become victims of crime. We also work closely with other forces, regionally and nationally, as well as the Regional Organised Crime Unit, to share intelligence and best practice to target drug suppliers.

“Neighbourhood teams and response officers are regularly patrolling areas that are used for ‘street dealing’ creating an environment where there is no safe place left to hide.

“County Lines gangs will often target children and young people, women and vulnerable adults to deliver drugs and money between locations.

“An operating base is also an essential feature of the County Lines criminal model. Gangs will regularly exploit vulnerable people, forcing them to build up a debt or using threats of violence in order to take over a person’s home, a practice known as ‘cuckooing’.

“Police have worked to identify people who may be either susceptible to, or victims of, drugs networks who use their homes to ‘set-up shop’. Once into the address drug dealers use this as a base to run their activity for short periods of time before moving on.

“Any address that has previously been used is entered onto a database and then visited by Neighbourhood teams. This relies on good working relationships between local partners, housing providers and tenants. This process also provides opportunities for rehabilitation and rehousing to break the cycle of vulnerability and offending where relevant.

“By consistently visiting people in our community we aim to reduce the risk of people becoming repeat victims of cuckooing and to continue to build the intelligence picture to ensure that other people are not put at risk of harm from Organised Crime Groups.

“We have continued to keep up this level of activity and in 2018 have continued to visit addresses where ‘live’ cuckooing is suspected to be taking place.

“We recognise that County Lines drug supply is a problem that cannot be solved by the police alone. We will continue to work with our partner agencies and our communities to tackle the issue, sending a clear message to drug suppliers that they are not welcome in Devon, Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly.”

Signs to look out for:

A young person’s involvement in county lines often leaves signs, below are some of the indicators of county lines involvement and exploitation:

  • A child or young person going missing from school or home or significant changes in emotional well-being
  • A person meeting unfamiliar adults or a change to their behaviour
  • The use of drugs and alcohol
  • Acquiring money or expensive gifts they can’t account for
  • Lone children from outside of the area
  • Individuals with multiple mobile phones or tablets or ‘SIM cards’
  • Young people with more money, expensive clothing, or accessories than they can account for
  • Unknown or suspicious looking characters coming and going from a neighbour’s house
  • Relationships with controlling or older individuals or associated with gangs
  • Suspicion of self-harm, physical assault or unexplained injuries

Gangs may also target women who tend to be drug users or have engaged in a relationship with a gang member. They can become victims of sexual and domestic violence and can also be coerced into delivery drugs or money for the gang.

Vulnerable adults who are in financial difficulties or who have mental health problems are usually the most likely victim of cuckooing.

What can you do?

If you have concerns surrounding children, follow safeguarding procedures and share your concerns with local authority social care services.

If you are being affected by any of the above or know someone who is then contact police via 101@dc.police.uk or by calling 101.

Alternatively you can call Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

Further information on County Lines can be found on our website: www.dc.police.uk/countylines

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Devon: Takes Drugs Seriously

May 3rd, 2018 by

Drugs can be dangerous. But does banning them cause more harm than good? Come along to learn about the impact of drugs on Devon and how we can better protect our community.

Join the discussion about what a new approach to drugs could mean for Devon, your family and your community.

Date and Time

Thu, May 17, 2018,  7:30 PM – 9:00 PM BST

Location

Exeter Corn Exchange, Market Street, Exeter, EX1 1BW

Speakers include:

Esther Campbell – Esther’s brother Luke died from an accidental ecstasy overdose. She is currently studying at the University of Bristol and is a member of the Anyone’s Child campaign. Esther wants the legal regulation of drug production and distribution to reduce the harm they pose.

Suzanne Sharkey – Vice chair for LEAP UK (Law Enforcement Action Partnership). Suzanne worked as a police officer for five years working in a specialised crime unit and undercover drugs buying operations. She is in long term recovery from problematic substance use.

Danny Kushlick – Founder of Transform Drug Policy Foundation in 1996, after working widely in the drugs field. He is now an internationally recognised commentator on drug and drug policy issues.

Chris Evans – Lost her son Jake to an accidental overdose. She now regularly gives talks on the subject and campaigns with Anyone’s Child for the legal control and regulation of drugs.

Followed by a Question and Answer discussion.

This is a free charity event, but donations will be gratefully received.

Sign up here

 

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Child Sexual Exploitation National Awareness Day 18/03/18

March 2nd, 2018 by

 

National Child Sexual Exploitation Awareness Day takes place on Sunday 18th March 2018.

 

Safer Cornwall, Our Safeguarding Children’s Partnership and the Safeguarding Adults Board will be participating in the awareness campaign with a focus on grooming on-line.

 

Keep an eye out for more information, and access the National Working Group website: https://www.nwgnetwork.org/event_type/national-cse-awareness-day-2018/

 

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Safer Cornwall are a working partnership involving: